Homepage

Upcoming events

COVID-19 Vaccination On-Campus Clinic

​Portland State University will host an on-campus COVID-19 vaccination clinic on May 12 and 13 at the Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom from 9 a.…
Add to my Calendar 2021-05-14 16:00:00 2021-05-13 00:17:42 COVID-19 Vaccination On-Campus Clinic ​Portland State University will host an on-campus COVID-19 vaccination clinic on May 12 and 13 at the Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. First doses of the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine will be available by appointment. Those who receive the vaccine will be automatically sent a link to register for their second dose, the week of May 31. The clinic, operated by the Safeway-Albertsons pharmacy, is open to all members of the PSU community, The clinic, operated by the Safeway-Albertsons pharmacy, is open to all members of the PSU community, along with friends, family, and neighbors. Parking will be provided at no cost to those attending the vaccination clinic in Parking Structure 1, 1872 SW 6th Ave. Please schedule vaccine clinic appointments via Safeway-Albertsons this link. To facilitate our safe return to campus and do our part as a regional partner for public health PSU announced this week that vaccines will be required for students and employees on campus starting Fall term. This clinic is an important first step in making the vaccine readily available to the PSU community. We expect to host additional clinics on campus in the months ahead.  For those unable to come to campus, regional providers are offering multiple no-appointment opportunities to get the COVID-19 vaccine including walk-in availability starting today at the Oregon Convention Center and drive-up opportunities at the Oregon Health & Science University’s site at the Portland International Airport this weekend. The Oregon Health Authority’s locator map and Washington residents can use Vaccinate Washington’s online tool for finding appointments.  ​ Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom, room 355 1825 SW Broadway Parking: 1872 SW 6th Ave ucomm@pdx.edu ucomm@pdx.edu America/Los_Angeles public

Open Book Discussion on 'Survival of the Friendliest'

Join Conflict Resolution's 25th Anniversary celebrations with an "all are…
Add to my Calendar 2021-05-14 12:00:00 2021-05-14 13:00:00 Open Book Discussion on 'Survival of the Friendliest' Join Conflict Resolution's 25th Anniversary celebrations with an "all are welcome" book discussion on Survival of the Friendliest: Understanding Our Origins and Rediscovering Our Common Humanity by Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods. Join via Zoom. RSVP For most of the approximately 300,000 years that Homo sapiens have existed, we have shared the planet with at least four other types of humans. All of these were smart, strong, and inventive. But around 50,000 years ago, Homo sapiens made a cognitive leap that gave us an edge over other species. What happened? Since Charles Darwin wrote about “evolutionary fitness,” the idea of fitness has been confused with physical strength, tactical brilliance, and aggression. In fact, what made us evolutionarily fit was a remarkable kind of friendliness, a virtuosic ability to coordinate and communicate with others that allowed us to achieve all the cultural and technical marvels in human history. Advancing what they call the “self-domestication theory,” Brian Hare, professor in the department of evolutionary anthropology and the Center for Cognitive Neuroscience at Duke University and his wife, Vanessa Woods, a research scientist and award-winning journalist, shed light on the mysterious leap in human cognition that allowed Homo sapiens to thrive.  But this gift for friendliness came at a cost. Just as a mother bear is most dangerous around her cubs, we are at our most dangerous when someone we love is threatened by an “outsider.” The threatening outsider is demoted to sub-human, fair game for our worst instincts. Hare’s groundbreaking research, developed in close coordination with Richard Wrangham and Michael Tomasello, giants in the field of cognitive evolution, reveals that the same traits that make us the most tolerant species on the planet also make us the cruelest.  Survival of the Friendliest offers us a new way to look at our cultural as well as cognitive evolution and sends a clear message: In order to survive and even to flourish, we need to expand our definition of who belongs. RSVP https://pdx.zoom.us/j/89687187727 https://www.pdx.edu/conflict-resolution/ https://www.pdx.edu/conflict-resolution/ America/Los_Angeles public

Bill Gray Speaker Series: Dr. Annette Kim

ethniCITY: Re-conceiving the contemporary city through linguistic…
Add to my Calendar 2021-05-14 12:00:00 2021-05-14 13:45:00 Bill Gray Speaker Series: Dr. Annette Kim ethniCITY: Re-conceiving the contemporary city through linguistic landscape data Dr. Annette Kim, Associate Professor at Sol Price School of Public Policy, University of Southern California The city is literally speaking to us in a cacophony of languages. We have generated a database and mapped 9 million textual signs on the major streets of Los Angeles from 2001/2 and 2017/18 – extracting and geocoding both the words themselves and the languages they speak down to the individual land parcel level. This database of images, text, location, and date, fills a data gap between public datasets which are perennially outdated and private datasets that often miss small, ethnic establishments. These insights can help us re-conceive the contemporary city. Instead of the outdated ethnic enclave concept, people move around (not always by choice) and live urban life dynamically, stitching together geographies of belonging. We see that ethnic places are not singular but overlapping and interspersed. We see signs of true ethnic interaction, with some establishments speaking in four different languages. https://pdx.zoom.us/j/89046524551 Center for Urban Studies Center for Urban Studies America/Los_Angeles public

Portland in Conversation: Hector Dominguez & Dawn Nafus on…

Portland in Conversation: The Infrastructure of the Public City TECHNOLOGY…
Add to my Calendar 2021-05-15 23:00:00 2021-05-14 15:24:21 Portland in Conversation: Hector Dominguez & Dawn Nafus on Technology Portland in Conversation: The Infrastructure of the Public City TECHNOLOGY | Portland I Portland Hector Dominguez, Smart City PDX Dawn Nafus, Intel Moderator: Mark Raggett, GBD Architects Portland is a city that is known internationally for its active, walkable streets and vibrant open spaces filled with people. With the work-from-home and social-distancing responses to the COVID-19 pandemic, those public spaces went quiet, but virtual meeting technologies and social media were able to step in and address many of those human connection needs. As the city comes out of the pandemic response, we have a different perspective on technology in cities: what roles will technology continue to play in our public spaces? What were they already doing? What are the ramifications of new technologies in our public spaces -- the ones we can see and the ones we can't -- and what should we be thinking about as technologies and our city continue to evolve? This event, part of a new series of talks on urban design presented by the PSU School of Architecture and the PSU Urban Design Collaborative, brings together Dawn Nafus and Hector Dominguez in a conversation about technology and its role in the city. Dawn Nafus is a Senior Research Scientist at Intel, where she conducts anthropological research on technology and society issues, including the social implications of health and environmental data, citizen science, and responsible AI. She is the editor of Quantified: Biosensing Technologies in Everyday Life (MIT Press, 2016), co-author of Self-Tracking (MIT Press 2016) and co-editor of Ethnography for a Data-Saturated World (Manchester University Press, 2018).  She holds a PhD from the University of Cambridge. Hector Dominguez is the Open Data Coordinator at the City of Portland, Oregon and part of the Smart City PDX team. In addition to Open Data initiatives, Hector has led privacy and information initiatives in the City that includes use of ethical tools for technology solutions assessment, privacy and information protection principles, establishing the citywide privacy and surveillance technologies strategies and procedures, and policy development including the face recognition technologies and Surveillance policies. Learn more about Portland in Conversation: The Infrastructure of the Public City. Zoom Webinar | Register at https://pdx.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_INXT1xnMRquoQlTvMVJnvw Email seewang@pdx.edu with questions. Email seewang@pdx.edu with questions. America/Los_Angeles public