Center for Japanese Studies

photos of downtown Portland and Tokyo side by side to create one image.

Over the past two decades, the Center for Japanese Studies has become world renowned for its vibrant academic, business, and cultural programming. Each academic year, we bring to PSU some of the world’s foremost experts on Japan. The Center has helped launch many students into successful careers through introductions to our worldwide network of experts.  We serve as a resource for the entire region, as we fundamentally increase our community’s understanding of Japan and its complexity.  

Upcoming events

Directing Plays by Mishima: Appeal, Challenges and Rewards

Join PSU's Center for Japanese Studies, with co-sponsors Department of…
Add to my Calendar 2021-03-09 18:00:00 2021-03-09 20:00:00 Directing Plays by Mishima: Appeal, Challenges and Rewards Join PSU's Center for Japanese Studies, with co-sponsors Department of World Languages and the Institute for Asian Studies, for our series, "Re-discovering the Work of Mishima Yukio, Fifty Years Out." REGISTER FOR WEBINAR Miyamoto Amon is one of Japan’s leading theater directors. He has directed numerous straight plays, musicals, and opera productions. In the last two decades he has taken many of his shows to the United States, Europe, and Canada. His debut in New York was as director of his Japanese version of the Broadway musical, Pacific Overtures, at the Lincoln Center Festival in 2004. Miyamoto is fascinated by the plays of Mishima Yukio. His award winning adaptation of Mishima’s masterpiece, Kinkakuji (The Temple of the Golden Pavilion) was performed to acclaim abroad as well in New York and in France. In 2016 Amon produced and directed Mishima’s big-cast blockbuster, The Terrace of the Leper King, set in the medieval Khmer Kingdom. Performance rights difficulties had prevented the play’s performance for almost fifty years. Miyamoto’s performance was the first staging since Mishima’s death. During the Corona lockdown in Japan last year, Miyamoto organized the huge “Sing for Hope” project which involved participants from all around the country. David Kaplan is the curator and co-founder of the Provincetown Tennessee Williams Theater Festival, now in its sixteenth year. In 2007 he directed the world premiere of “The Day in Which a Man Dies,” a play written by Tennessee Williams about the death of Jackson Pollock as told by a Mishima-inspired narrator. This began Kaplan’s research into the relationship, personal and professional, between Mishima and Williams. In 2018 Kaplan curated a Tennessee Williams and Mishima season in Provincetown, pairing productions of four plays by Williams with four by Mishima. Jerry Mouawad is Artistic Co-Director and Founding Member of Imago Theatre in Portland, Oregon. In the spring and fall of 2012, he directed and choreographed the English-language premiere of the 1961 masterpiece The Black Lizard, which is Yukio Mishima’s most technically challenging modern play available in translation, incorporating many elements of kabuki acting and staging. Jerry studied the teachings of Jacques Lecoq at the Hayes-Marshall School of Theatre Arts. His awards include an Oregon Arts Commission Fellowship, Portland Theater Guild Fellowship, Best Director by the Independent Reviewers of New England, the New York Dance Film Award, and Portland Theatre awards for acting, light design, choreography, and best original play. This series has been made possible by a grant from the Toshiba International Foundation. Remote cjs@pdx.edu cjs@pdx.edu America/Los_Angeles public

The Business of Totoro: The Art and Industry of Studio Ghibli

The Business of Totoro: The Art and Industry of Studio Ghibli A Zoom…
Add to my Calendar 2021-03-24 18:00:00 2021-03-24 19:00:00 The Business of Totoro: The Art and Industry of Studio Ghibli The Business of Totoro: The Art and Industry of Studio Ghibli A Zoom Presentation by Professor Patrick Terry, PSU School of Film March 24, 2021 | 6 - 7pm PST Suggested donation: $5 student ticket; $10 regular ticket Studio Ghibli is known the world over for its heartfelt stories, lush animation, and memorable characters. In this talk, Dr. Patrick Terry argues that the success of Studio Ghibli is built equally on the quality of the studio and structural changes within Japan’s domestic film industry. Looking at case studies ranging from Nausicaä of the Valley of the Wind, Castle in the Sky, My Neighbor Totoro, and Spirited Away we will track the emergence and success of one of the world’s most recognizable animation studios. Presented by Encorepreneur Cafewith Co-Sponsors PSU Center for Japanese Studies and Portland State University More information and registration Virtual by Zoom info@encorepreneurcafe.com or (503) 954-2837. info@encorepreneurcafe.com or (503) 954-2837. America/Los_Angeles public