Fall 2020 Courses

Ancient city in Morocco

Applied Linguistics

Understanding the International Experience

Instructor Kimberley Brown

Course Number 471

CRN 11821

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Examination of communication-based dimensions of an international or intercultural experience, including teaching English to speakers of other languages. Development of strategies and activities required to meet the challenges of teaching, working, or doing research in an international/intercultural setting. All linguistics students must register for Ling 471/Ling 571, however, this course is the same course as Intl 471. May be taken concurrently with Ling 390. Prerequisites: upper-division or postbac academic standing.

Schedule T/TH 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Language, Identity, & Culture

Instructor Kimberley Brown

Department Applied Linguistics

Course Number 531

CRN 14792

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Provides a systematic overview of theories and practices concerning the relationship of language, culture, and identity (personal and cultural). It will address common misconceptions about language and culture, and promote an understanding of the affective nature of language. Students will develop skills in analyzing information and data about culture and language, including variation in language use and thematic analysis of interview data. This course will focus on adult educational settings, domestic and global. Also offered for undergraduate-level credit as Ling 431 and may be taken only once for credit.

Art History

Art History: The Ancient World

Instructor N/A

Department Art History

Course Number 204

CRN 101112

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Survey of the major works of art and architecture from around the world, and an introduction to the analytical tools used by art historians. This course investigates art and architecture from the prehistoric era, ancient Mediterranean cultures, Byzantium, the Islamic world, and early works from South and Southeast Asia, China and Korea. This is the first course in a sequence of three: ArH 204, ArH 205, and ArH 206. Open to non-majors.

South and Southeast Asian Art

Instructor Junghee Lee

Department Art History

Course Number 311U

CRN 14468

Credit Hours 4

Course Description A survey of art and architecture of South and Southeast Asian art from prehistoric times to the 19th century. The art and architecture (including ceramics, sculpture, painting) of Asia will be presented in context of chronology, source (indigenous or foreign influence), site and in relation to the forces of each society's culture, religion, politics, geography, and history. Buddhism, Hinduism, Islamic architecture, painting, symbolism, and mythology are basic to the arts of Asia.

Attributes Global Perspectives Cluster, Interpreting the Past Cluster PAST

Schedule T/TH 10:00am - 11:50am

Early Medieval Art & Architecture

Instructor N/A

Department Art History

Course Number 356U

CRN 14488

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Explores the art and architecture of Early Christian, Insular, Viking, Carolingian, and early Islamic world. Works covered include early Christian catacombs, the Book of Kells, and the so-called desert palaces of Umayyad caliphs in order to explore the themes of monasticism, pilgrimage, and the transmission of ideas around the Mediterranean.

Attributes Interpreting the Past Cluster 

Black Studies

African Studies

Instructor Safia Farole

Department Black Studies

Course Number 211A

CRN 10417

Credit Hours 4

Course Description An introductory course designed to provide students with an understanding of methods and sources used by the historian of the African past. Museum visits, guest speakers, and films will supplement the lecture format. In addition to a survey of major themes and issues in the history of the African continent, the course will consider the rise of complex societies, indigenous African towns, agricultural and technological achievements, African state systems, and the impact of international trade and Islam on Africa.

Schedule T/TH 11:00am - 12:15am

English

Jewish & Israeli Literature

Instructor Michael Weingrad

Department English

Course Number 330U

CRN 11182

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Introduction to modern Jewish literature in its diasporic and national contexts. Emphasis on the transition from sacred to secular literature; reflection of historical and social realities; development of literatures in Europe and the Middle East.

Attributes Global Perspectives Cluster, Popular Culture Cluster 

Film

Jewish American Experience in Film

Instructor Michael Weingrad

Department Film

Course Number 384U

CRN 11305

Credit Hours 4

Course Description The Jewish experience in the United States has been reflected, celebrated, and challenged in American cinema since the beginning of the sound era—which began with the release of The Jazz Singer, a blockbuster film about a cantor’s son torn between American success and Jewish tradition. In this course we will examine and critique cinematic representations of the American Jewish story, looking at immigration, Americanization, suburbia, antisemitism, politics, race, faith, and nostalgia. Films include Hester Street, Avalon, The Way We Were, State and Main, Fiddler on the Roof, Bye Bye Braverman, the documentaries Town Bloody Hall and Arguing the World, and Yiddish classics Uncle Moses and Tevye the Dairyman

Attributes American Identities Cluster, Popular Culture Cluster POPC 

Honors College

Orhan Pamuk’s Istanbul

Instructor Pelin Basci

Department University Honors College

Course Number 407

CRN 11512

Credit Hours 4

Course Description How does fiction create spaces for cultural and artistic cross-fertilization between what we see as the East and the West? Drawing on post-modern, modern and pre-modern artistic and literary traditions, as well as European and Middle Eastern classics, the work of Nobel Laureate (2006) Orhan Pamuk offers fertile ground for the exploration of this question. Pamuk is one of the most interesting, original, and prolific authors in Turkish literature. His work has been translated into 60 languages, including English. In these works the city—especially his beloved Istanbul—emerges as a literary hub, the crossroads of many cosmopolitan encounters. We will work in a seminar setting to contextualize Pamuk’s work, investigate his textual references, and explore his city of fiction. The course will focus on My Name Is Red (Eng. 2001), Black Book (Eng. 1994, 2006) and Istanbul. Memories and the City (Eng. 2005). Students will be asked to prepare a final paper involving one other work by Pamuk (e.g. a novel, a book of essays, a screenplay, a museum, or a museum catalog). 

Schedule M/W 10:00am - 11:50am

History

Comparative World History: Islam and Modernity

Instructor James Grehan

Department History

Course Number 490

CRN 11560

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Over the past three centuries, Islam has experienced sweeping reforms and redefinitions in belief, ritual, and self-understanding. In many respects, the religion today is very different from the way it was practiced and conceived in earlier generations. This course offers a survey of the cultural and intellectual movements that have arisen throughout the Islamic world, from the eighteenth through the twentieth century, as it has tried to meet the challenges of modernity. We will look at basic questions in modern history: cultural and religious reactions to Western colonialism and imperialism in the non-Western world; the capacity of older cultural, religious, and legal systems to adapt to the new social and cultural realities of modern life; the relationship between religion and politics; and the various attempts of scholars and intellectuals to reformulate religion in an era of sweeping social and cultural change. Most of our discussions and readings will center around the lands and cultures of the Middle East and South Asia, which still form the core of the wider Islamic world. Yet we will also take time to create a comparative framework incorporating Islamic movements from other regions such as sub-Saharan Africa, Central Asia, and Southeast Asia. One final purpose of the course will be to examine parallels between Islam and other major religions in modern times. We will try to place it within a worldwide perspective and thereby question claims about some of its supposedly unique features.

Schedule: M/W 2:00pm - 3:50pm

Ancient Near East & Egypt

Instructor George Armantrout

Department History

Course Number 314U

CRN 11539

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Covers the Stone Age to the death of Alexander the Great in 323 BC, from Afghanistan to Egypt. Topics include the agricultural revolution, Gilgamesh, the Bible, the Persians, Afrocentrism, and Zoroastrianism. Expected preparation: Hst 101 or upper-division standing.

Attributes Interpreting the Past Cluster

Jewish History: Antiquity to Medieval

Instructor Loren Spielman

Department History

Course Number 317U

CRN 14833/14631

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Introduces students to the Jewish historical experience from its Biblical origins through the end of the first millennium CE primarily by means of close readings of primary sources. Describes the diverse forms of Jewish life under Persian, Greco-Roman, Early Christian and Muslim rule and examines the boundaries of pre-modern Jewish cultural and religious identity. This is the same course as JSt 317 and may be taken only once for credit.

Attributes Interpreting the Past Cluster 

Schedule T/TH 10:00am - 11:50am

Topics in World History: World Religions

Instructor Thomas Luckett

Department History

Course Number 390U

CRN 14385

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Provides an overview of a particular period and/or theme in world history. Students will focus on major trends and/or connections related to the specific topic. Coverage will be global in breadth. 

We will examine the origins and early elaboration of the great Eurasian religious traditions from the "Axial Age" (roughly 6th-5th centuries BCE) to the rise of Scholasticism (9th-13th centuries CE). We will study the parallel development and mutual influence of ancient Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Platonism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, Confucianism, Taoism and Islam. With particular focus on ancient Iran, we will examine how the Persian Empire created the conditions for the exchange of new religious and philosophical ideas over extremely broad distances, and between extremely different cultures. Readings will include both modern historical studies and ancient scriptural and historical sources. All readings for this course will be made available online at no charge, so there are no books to be purchased.

Attributes Global Perspectives Cluster 

Schedule T/TH 2:00pm - 3:50pm

Public History Seminar: Museums & Memory in the U.S. and Israel 

Instructor Nina Spiegel

Department History

Course Number 494

CRN 15004

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Engages students in advanced investigation of special topics in public history work, including archives, oral history, project design, digital history, and others. Seminars feature technical readings, group work, peer evaluation, and written projects. Prerequisite: Upper-division standing.

This seminar examines the relationship between national history, memory, and museums in Israel and the United States. Incorporating field trips to local museums, the course investigates cultural debates that take place over the presentation of national history at public sites. Providing a comparative approach, the course explores the role of memory in shaping national identity, investigating questions such as: How is national memory formed? How does it operate in different national contexts? What are the politics of cultural memory in these two locales? No prerequisites are required.

Schedule M 2:00pm - 4:50pm

International Studies

Introduction to Middle East Studies

Instructor Robert Asaadi

Department International Studies

Course Number 247C

CRN 11599

Credit Hours 4

Course Description In-depth interdisciplinary or topical study of one of the regional foci in the International Studies degree program.

Schedule T/TH 2:00pm - 3:15pm

Women in the Middle East

Instructor Taghrid Khuri

Department International Studies

Course Number 331U

CRN 11602/14295

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Aims to explore the role and status of women in the contemporary Middle East with respect to institutions such as the family, law, education, work, and politics --areas which intersect and overlap with broader cultural questions about women and their place in tradition, modernity, nation-building, Islam, and the West. This course is the same as WS 331U and may only be taken once for credit.

Attributes Global Perspectives Cluster, Gender/ Sexualities Cluster

Topics in Asian Thought

Instructor Yoko H Sakurauchi

Department International Studies

Course Number 317U

CRN 11600

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Study of the religious and ethical traditions of Asia including, but not limited to, Buddhism, Confucianism, Hinduism, and Islam, their social and cultural importance, and their ties to political thought and history.

Attributes Global Perspectives Cluster 

Bollywood: South Asia Through Cinema

Instructor Priya Kapoor

Department International Studies

Course Number 360U

CRN 11604

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Bollywood encompasses media industries in India and South Asia that produce entertainment for worldwide consumption. We examine transnational Indian Cinema emphasizing: Globalization and the politics of transnational film production, distribution, and reception. Local-regional-global dynamics. The construction and negotiation of gender, family, nation, religion/communalism, and emerging filmic genres. Filmic representation and diasporic identities.

Attributes Global Perspectives Cluster, Popular Culture Cluster 

Judaic Studies

Sex, Love, and Gender in Israel

Instructor Nina Spiegel

Department Judaic Studies

Course Number 335U

CRN  14816

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Examines intersections of gender and nationalism; the role of masculinity; conceptions of femininity, sex, love, and motherhood; and the impact of gender on the Arab-Israeli conflict. Investigates the history and experiences of a diverse array of women in Israel, including Jewish women, Israeli Arab and Palestinian women, and foreign workers.

Attributes Gender/Sexualities Cluster

Schedule T/TH 12:00pm - 1:50pm

Introduction to Judaism 

Instructor Natan Meir

Department Judaic Studies

Course Number 201

CRN 14633

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Traces the development of Judaism as a religious system and civilization from the biblical period through the middle ages and into the modern era. Describes the practices and beliefs of Judaism as a lived religion primarily through the investigation of primary sources.

Schedule M/W 12:00pm - 1:50pm

Music

World Music: Africa

Instructor Julia Banzi

Department Music

Course Number 374U

CRN 12771

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Study of the major musical cultures of Africa and the Middle East. Explores social and cultural contexts, instrument types, and structural organization of the music. Emphasis on listening. This is the first course in a sequence of two, Mus 374U: Africa and Mus 375U: Asia.

Attributes Global Perspectives Cluster 

Schedule T/TH 10:00am - 11:50am

Political Science

Introduction to Politics of the Middle East

Instructor Lindsay Benstead

Department Political Science

Course Number  361U

CRN 13144

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Introduction to Middle Eastern political systems. Focus will be on the nature of traditional politics, modernization and political development in the region, social stratification, institutions of government, and the political systems of selected Middle East countries. Recommended prerequisite: PS 204 or 205.

Attributes Global Perspectives Cluster 

International Politics

Instructor Robert Asaadi

Department Political Science

Course Number 205

CRN 13137

Credit Hours 4

Course Description An analysis of the nature of relations among nations, with specific reference to contemporary international issues. Motivating factors will be examined, including nationalism, economic rivalries, and the quest for security. Also treated will be the problem of national sovereignty and its relationship to international cooperation, changing threats to international security in the post-Cold War era, and the increasing importance of international economic competition and cooperation.

Schedule M/W/F 10:15am - 11:20am

Introduction to African Politics

Instructor Safia Farole

Department Political Science

Course Number 355U

CRN 14807

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Introduction to the policies, institutions, and processes of the politics of Sub-Saharan Africa.

Schedule T/TH 2:00pm - 3:50pm

World Languages & Literatures

Stories in the Time of Pandemics: Plagues and Pestilence in World Literature

Instructor Multiple

Department World Languages & Literatures

Course Number 399

CRN 14992

Credit Hours 2

Course Description Each week, a different World Languages professor will present a short text (or excerpt of a long text, such as Love in the Time of Cholera) that explores a pandemic, plaque, or quarantine. Texts will be from around the world (Russia, China, Colombia, Italy, Japan, Germany, Ancient Greece, North Africa and the Middle East) and across the ages, and will allow us to explore how different people and cultures have represented pandemics and their physical and emotional effects.

Schedule T 10:00am - 11:50am

Fairy Tales: Arab Folklore

Instructor Yasmeen Hanoosh

Department World Languages & Literatures

Course Number 319U

CRN 15039

Credit Hours 4

Course Description A study of the fairy tale, folklore and/or other works originating orally representing a range of critical social and cultural issues. May be repeated with different topics. Course taught in English.

Attributes Interpreting the Past Cluster 

Schedule T/TH 12:00pm - 1:50pm

University Studies

Global Perspectives: Africa

Instructor Safia Farole

Department University Studies

Course Number 233L

CRN 13975

Credit Hours 4

Course Description Focuses on working to understand how history, culture and geography inform the present situation in a specific region of the world. Students explore the forces of tradition and modernity, nationalism, colonialism and empire, and globalization and development. Exploration of perspectives, attitudes and beliefs of another culture/region informs students of the interconnectedness of human experience that frames contemporary global interactions. Mentored Inquiry co-requisite.

Schedule T/TH 11:00am - 12:15pm