Andries Deinum Prize for Visionaries and Provocateurs

Professor Andries Deinum, courtesy of the PSU Archives 

The Andries Deinum Prize for Visionaries and Provocateurs will be awarded annually to recognize and celebrate the exceptional creative potential of an undergraduate or graduate student (or students in collaboration) enrolled in PSU College of the Arts. The 2019 prize amount is $10,000. 

Apply now for the 2019 prize!

View the application form

Past Winners

2018 - Cheryl Leontina (Architecture)

2017 - Megan Hanley (Art Practice)

2016 - Paul Newman (Film)

 

Description of Prize 

Film educator and PSU professor Andries Deinum transformed Portland’s cultural and intellectual landscape through his innovative use of film in education. In the 1960s he produced innovative public television shows that ignited community conversations around urban planning, civil rights and censorship. In 1969 he founded the Center for the Moving Image at PSU. A beloved professor, his emphasis on art’s role in civic life helped the university live up to its motto, “Let Knowledge Serve the City.”  

Portland State University will award the Andries Deinum Prize for Visionaries and Provocateurs to an undergraduate or graduate student currently enrolled in PSU’s College of the Arts who is committed to expanding public dialogue via creative artistic expression, original research or an innovative project highlighting the role and value of art in the 21st Century.  

As its name suggests, this is not a traditional academic award. In fact, proposals are encouraged that arise from passionate ideas, advance the human spirit, and inspire others. Those coming from “a fire in the belly” are welcome.

 

Requirements

Undergraduate and graduate students from one of the four schools in the College of Arts may apply for the prize. 

 

Deadline

The application deadline for the 2019 prize is Tuesday, April 2 at 5pm. 

View the application form

Incomplete applications will not be considered. 

 

How to Apply 

Individual Application

1.  Fill out the application form.

2.  Email supporting materials to deinumprize@pdx.edu. Attachments should be in Word or PDF form. Please include:

  • Statement on academic and professional goals (maximum 750 words)
  • Description of the project (maximum 1,000 words)
  • Resume
  • Two letters of support from faculty members, including one from a thesis advisor or departmental equivalent that address the student’s past academic work, his or her aptitude as a creative scholar, the relevance of the proposed project to the student’s field of study, and the student’s ability to complete the project.

Guidelines for submitting project

Application must include a cover page with project title, student name, student major and email address. Each page of the document must include the student's last name and document page number as a header or footer.

Group Application

*For a group application, the group must choose a leader. 

1.  Each group member must fill out the application form.

2.  Email the following supporting materials to deinumprize@pdx.edu. Attachments should be in Word or PDF form. Please include:

  • Description of the project (maximum 1,000 words) (only one project description per group)
  • Statement on academic and professional goals (maximum 750 words) (each group member must submit a statement)
  • Resume (each group member must submit a resume)
  • Two letters of support from faculty members, including one from a thesis advisor or departmental equivalent that address the student’s past academic work, his or her aptitude as a creative scholar, the relevance of the proposed project to the student’s field of study, and the student’s ability to complete the project. (letters of support should be submitted for the group leader only)

Timeline

April 2 at 5pm: Applications are due.

Early May: The prize committee reviews the applications and selects the honoree.

Mid-May: The honoree is notified of the award. 

June 2019: The honoree is publicly announced and receives $5,000 to begin their project.

December 2019: The honoree presents a progress report to the prize jury and receives $4,000.

October 2020: The honoree presents the completed project at a public event during Portland State of Mind and receives the remaining $1,000. 

 

About Andries Deinum 

Film educator Andries Deinum transformed Portland’s cultural and intellectual landscape through his innovative use of film in education.  Beginning in 1958 his classes on the art of film, offered through the Portland Extension Center, plus his lectures at the Portland Art Museum, the City Club and other venues brought public attention to film as the primary art form of the 20th century.  A pioneer in film studies, Deinum brought the discipline to Portland State and contributed to its acceptance at other colleges.  His Center for the Moving Image (CMI), established in 1969 at Portland State University with his colleague Thomas T. Taylor III, laid the groundwork for the Northwest Film Center and Portland’s thriving film community. Until it was eliminated from the University’s budget in 1981, CMI was the most complete professional filmmaking and film studies program in the Pacific Northwest.   

Deinum’s unique approach to teaching placed film at the heart of a liberal arts education, a hub that linked with and enriched many disciplines.   Following the tradition of Van Gogh, whom he greatly admired, Deinum believed that “art is nothing at all unless it is equipment for living…unless it untangles our surrounding chaos for us, rather than adding to it.”  Hence his oft’ cited dictum: “Art should stir people up, not mix them up.” He railed against “irrelevant ingenuities” that flood popular culture, and encouraged his film students to look beyond the screen to see the bigger picture.  

As an individual who had seen the oppressive force of Nazi Germany in his native Friesland and confronted the Hollywood blacklist in his adopted home, Deinum placed high value on the role of the personal voice in art and public life.  Outspoken and often controversial, he used both film and public television to ignite conversations around a wide range of issues such as urban planning, minority rights, love, and censorship. With his humanistic passion for the arts as central to education and life he fostered open, non-commercialized, informed dialogue between individuals and groups regarding contemporary culture and society. 

Active in both civic affairs and teaching, Deinum helped to guide PSU’s development as an urban university. The “Vital Partners” theme he originated as part of building a productive University/City relationship is carried today in PSU’s motto, “Let Knowledge Serve the City.”

Learn more about Andries Deinum and the Center for the Moving Image in the PSU Archives. 

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