Research Highlights

Members of the initiative conduct wide-ranging research related to the social determinants of health. Here's just a small sampling of the research currently being conducted by category.

Addiction                   Autism                        Employment              Health Care Systems

Housing                      Incarceration                 Mental Health                 Nutrition & Fitness

Race & Ethnicity                 Sexual Health                Women                  Youth              Violence

 

Addiction

Improving Addiction Care Team (IMPACT): The Improving Addiction Care Team (IMPACT) is a community-engaged health systems intervention and research study aimed at improving care for hospitalized adults with substance use disorders. IMPACT includes an interprofessional inpatient addiction medicine consult service at OHSU and linkages to community addiction care. Post-acute care linkages include methadone, suboxone, and outpatient group treatment in the Portland metro area and across the state. IMPACT also includes a novel model of 'Medically Enhanced Residential Treatment' that will integrate long term intravenous antibiotics and residential addiction care for adults needing long term infusion and residential addiction care. Key partners include Central City Concern, CODA, Coram infusion, and OHSU. IMPACT started in July, 2015 and has funding support through OHSU and CareOregon. For more information, contact Honora Englander at engladh@ohsu.edu.

 

Meaningful Use and Treatment of Smoking in Federally-Qualified Health Centers

PI: Steffani R Bailey, PhD, OHSU, Department of Family Medicine, bailstef@ohsu.edu, (503)418-9805

This  study examines the impact of the implementation of Stage 1 Meaningful Use of Electronic Health Records on the assessment and treatment of smoking in a network of Federally-Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), and identify facilitators and barriers to the delivery and utilization of smoking cessation treatments in these settings. This project will provide information for medical providers and policy makers as they attempt to increase smoking cessation services for underserved patients through the use of electronic health records. This study is funded by NIDA (K23 Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award) through 1/31/2020.

 

Oregon Partnership for Health Integration (OPHI). OPHI is a joint project of Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare, Outside In and the PSU Regional Research Institute. Adults with high behavioral health needs (Quadrants II & IV) and no primary care are eligible to enroll. OPHI provides primary health care through the Outside In medical van integrated with mental health and wellness services from Cascadia. Care is coordinated through a mental health nurse, and the wellness services are provided by a team of peer wellness coaches. Project goals include reducing the prevalence of chronic physical and behavioral health challenges of participants, especially people who are homeless and/or experience co-occurring addiction and mental health challenges. RRI is conducting an evaluation of OPHI outcomes and processes. Key outcomes being tracked include: Program satisfaction and overall sense of wellness, mental health symptoms, substance use, tobacco use, BMI, waist circumference, breath CO levels, cholesterol, and blood glucose. Funding is provided by the US Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (Grant ID#SM60850). The grant period is October 2012 through September 2016.  Contact: Renee Boak, Project Director; Renee.boak@cascadiabhc.org; Lead Evaluator: Karen Cellarius, cellark@pdx.edu, (503) 725-4112

Autism Spectrum Disorder

Autism and Skilled Employment is an exploratory study to inform future intervention uses a community based participatory research (CBPR) approach to conduct a qualitative study of autistic employees in skilled positions, their employers, and key informants from within the broader employment system to understand their experiences and ideas for change. We will use the findings from these multi-stakeholer, qualitative interviews to inform the development of a dynamic model of the components involved in employment for autistic professionals, and an intervention plan. This study is being conducted by the Academic Autism Spectrum Partnership in Research and Education (AASPIRE, aaspire.organization). For more information, contact Dora Raymaker at draymake@pdx.edu.

Advancing Social Communication & Play (Funded by a Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences): This multi-university (led by University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill), randomized control trial examines the efficacy of a social communication and play intervention for preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) implemented within their public school preschool classroom.  Preschool education teams randomly assigned to the intervention condition provide direct intervention to the children; they are coached in the model throughout the academic year by the research team.  For more information, please contact Amy Donaldson; adonald@pdx.edu 

SocialsibS (Funded by an Autism Speaks' Treatment Grant: Pilot Level): This project examines the effects of a sibling-mediated intervention on the social engagement of young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their families.  The intervention combines sibling mediation and video modeling intervention methods to target specific social communication goals.  As the study is completed within the PSU Speech and Language Clinic, it also investigates the effects of an apprenticeship model of pre-professional training for speech-language pathology graduate students serving children with ASD.  For additional information, please contact: Amy Donaldson; adonald@pdx.edu.

The Academic Autistic Spectrum Partnership in Research and Education (AASPIRE)AASPIRE is an ongoing academic community partnership that brings together academics, autistic individuals, family members, disability professionals and healthcare providers to conduct research to improve the lives of adults on the autism spectrum. AASPIRE recently developed and tested the AASPIRE Healthcare Toolkit, an interactive toolkit to improve the primary healthcare of adults on the autism spectrum. The toolkit is available at www.autismandhealth.org. Other projects focus on employment and well-being. More information about AASPIRE is available at www.aaspire.org. Funding: National Institute of Mental Health. Contact: Christina Nicolaidis nicol22@pdx.edu.
 

Employment

Autism and Skilled Employment is an exploratory study to inform future intervention uses a community based participatory research (CBPR) approach to conduct a qualitative study of autistic employees in skilled positions, their employers, and key informants from within the broader employment system to understand their experiences and ideas for change. We will use the findings from these multi-stakeholer, qualitative interviews to inform the development of a dynamic model of the components involved in employment for autistic professionals, and an intervention plan. This study is being conducted by the Academic Autism Spectrum Partnership in Research and Education (AASPIRE, aaspire.organization). For more information, contact Dora Raymaker at draymake@pdx.edu.

COMPASS (COMmunity of Practice And Safety Support)
Ryan Olson (PI)
COMPASS is a Total Worker Health(R) Intervention that was developed and studied as part of the Oregon Healthy Workforce Center funded by NIOSH.  COMPASS uses a peer-led curriculum to organize home care workers into neighborhood-based groups that provide education and social support for improving safety conditions/behaviors and preventive health behaviors (e.g., diet, exercise) and safety behaviors.  For more detail visit the COMPASS project description at the Oregon Healthy Workforce Center website.

Linking Economic Development and Public Health Efforts: Opportunity for Catalyzing Change – Program Design & Evaluation Services. According to Dr. Thomas Frieden’s Health Impact Pyramid, interventions that affect socioeconomic factors could have the largest impact on population health, but public health’s specific role in improving socioeconomic conditions is unclear. One possible approach is linking public health with economic development efforts. Lifelong Information for Entrepreneurs (LIFE) Plus is an example of linking these efforts in Oregon. LIFE Plus was designed for women within Oregon’s Coffee Creek Correctional Facility. Incarcerated women suffer disproportionately from physical and mental health problems and substance use issues, as well as from unemployment and poverty. Health problems and other factors – such as minimal education, poor social skills, and stigma – place formerly incarcerated women at higher risk of unemployment and poverty; these, in turn, can exacerbate health problems. Mercy Corps Northwest and Multnomah County Health Department are collaborating on LIFE Plus to improve incarcerated women’s opportunities for self-employment, success in regular employment, and health outcomes, and eventually to decrease recidivism. LIFE Plus integrates public health and economic development systems through the following components: 1) microenterprise training for incarcerated women that incorporates business plan development, employment skill-building, and practical tools for mental and physical health self-management, 2) post-incarceration support for employment, health, and other community services, 3) community action through coalition partnerships to support economic well-being and health for the formerly incarcerated, and 4) evidence-gathering to support policy changes and agency practice. Funding for this project has come from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Northwest Health Foundation, the United Way of the Columbia-Willamette, Multnomah County Department of Community Justice, and private philanthropic sources. Contact: Julie Maher, PhD, julie.e.maher@state.or.us.

Work-Family & Health Network: The WFHN is a multi-site research cooperative providing scientific evidence about how changes in the work environment – specifically around work and family issues - can improve the health of workers and their families while benefiting organizations. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) launched the Network in 2005. A new project, Development and Evaluation of Veteran-Supportive Supervisor Training (VSST): Improving Reintegration of the Oregon National Guard and Reserves into the Workplace” is a randomized control trial focusing on increasing support for veterans and their families in the civilian workforce. For more information on this study, please visit the website for the Center for Work, Family, Stress, Safety & Health

Health Care Systems

Care Transitions Innovation (C-TRAIN): The Care Transitions Innovation (C-TRAIN), is a nationally recognized, multicomponent transitional care improvement program that was started for socioeconomically vulnerable adults at OHSU. C-TRAIN includes 1) transitional nursing, social work, and pharmacy care; 2) enhanced linkages to primary care medical homes; and, 3) explicit efforts to better integrate care regional systems across hospital and community settings. C-TRAIN started as an institutionally funded intervention at OHSU hospital in 2009 in partnership with Central City Concern, Virginia Garcia, and OHSU's Internal Medicine Clinic. Through funding from the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Innovation (CMMI) from 2012-2015, C-TRAIN has now spread to three Legacy Hospitals and has funding to continue from OHSU and CareOregon. For more information, contact Honora Englander at engladh@ohsu.edu.
 

Community Capacitation Center of the Multnomah County Health Dept. The Community Capacitation Center conducts community-based participatory research and empowerment evaluation about a range of topics of interest to the communities we serve.  Our research agenda includes: 1) the influence of training methodology on the roles Community Health Workers (CHWs) play; 2) the relationship between the roles CHWs play and their efficacy; 3) the relationship between culturally-centered CHW curricula and positive changes in CHWs, their families and their communities; and 4) the role of CHWs in preventing and reducing violence affecting young people. Contact: Dr. Pei-ru Wang; pei-ru.wang@multco.us 

Community Partnership for Health and Equity (CPHE) is comprised of community leaders, academic faculty and university students and focuses on addressing health inequities with culturally-diverse, low-income residents in the Portland, Oregon metropolitan area. CPHE principles center on community-based participatory research approaches that foster co-learning, community capacity building, community advocacy, and self-efficacy. Contact: Eileen Brennan, eileen@pdx.edu or Jana Meinhold, meinhold@pdx.edu.

Interprofessional Care Access Network (I-CAN), led by PI Peggy Wros, PhD, RN, is innovative interprofessional education and collaborative practice model that provides community-based, interprofessional care coordination to socially isolated and vulnerable populations. I-CAN demonstrates that providing patient-centered healthcare focused on social determinants of health (the conditions in which people are born, grow, live, work, and age) is more effective than only focusing on disease management. I-CAN also models an interprofessional service-learning healthcare education system in a real-world context so future providers can better encourage and deliver collaborative healthcare. Last, I-CAN addresses the Triple Aim goals of  improving individual and population health while controlling costs. For more information contact Kate LaForge at laforge@ohsu.edu.

 

Meaningful Use and Treatment of Smoking in Federally-Qualified Health Centers

PI: Steffani R Bailey, PhD, OHSU, Department of Family Medicine, bailstef@ohsu.edu, (503)418-9805

 

This  study examines the impact of the implementation of Stage 1 Meaningful Use of Electronic Health Records on the assessment and treatment of smoking in a network of Federally-Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs), and identify facilitators and barriers to the delivery and utilization of smoking cessation treatments in these settings. This project will provide information for medical providers and policy makers as they attempt to increase smoking cessation services for underserved patients through the use of electronic health records. This study is funded by NIDA (K23 Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award) through 1/31/2020.

 

Oregon Community Health Worker Consortium. With funding from the Cambia Foundation, faculty at the School of Community Health, along with a variety of community partner organizations, recently organized the Oregon CHW Research and Education Consortium.  The aim of the research team within the Consortium is to contribute to knowledge in the CHW field through three primary activities: 

  1. Development of a CHW research agenda for Oregon
  2. Serving as a clearinghouse to promote synergy among those interested in CHW research
  3. Investigation of priority issues on the research agenda

Questions we hope to explore include the role of CHWs in addressing social determinants of health.  Consistent with CHW philosophy and methodology, we are committed to taking a community-based participatory research to all our work.  For more information, please contact Noelle Wiggins, Director, Community Capacitation Center, at 503-988-6250, x26646.

Housing

Oregon Partnership for Health Integration (OPHI). OPHI is a joint project of Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare, Outside In and the PSU Regional Research Institute. Adults with high behavioral health needs (Quadrants II & IV) and no primary care are eligible to enroll. OPHI provides primary health care through the Outside In medical van integrated with mental health and wellness services from Cascadia. Care is coordinated through a mental health nurse, and the wellness services are provided by a team of peer wellness coaches. Project goals include reducing the prevalence of chronic physical and behavioral health challenges of participants, especially people who are homeless and/or experience co-occurring addiction and mental health challenges. RRI is conducting an evaluation of OPHI outcomes and processes. Key outcomes being tracked include: Program satisfaction and overall sense of wellness, mental health symptoms, substance use, tobacco use, BMI, waist circumference, breath CO levels, cholesterol, and blood glucose. Funding is provided by the US Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (Grant ID#SM60850). The grant period is October 2012 through September 2016.  Contact: Renee Boak, Project Director; Renee.boak@cascadiabhc.org; Lead Evaluator: Karen Cellarius, cellark@pdx.edu, (503) 725-4112

Incarceration

Linking Economic Development and Public Health Efforts: Opportunity for Catalyzing Change – Program Design & Evaluation Services. According to Dr. Thomas Frieden’s Health Impact Pyramid, interventions that affect socioeconomic factors could have the largest impact on population health, but public health’s specific role in improving socioeconomic conditions is unclear. One possible approach is linking public health with economic development efforts. Lifelong Information for Entrepreneurs (LIFE) Plus is an example of linking these efforts in Oregon. LIFE Plus was designed for women within Oregon’s Coffee Creek Correctional Facility. Incarcerated women suffer disproportionately from physical and mental health problems and substance use issues, as well as from unemployment and poverty. Health problems and other factors – such as minimal education, poor social skills, and stigma – place formerly incarcerated women at higher risk of unemployment and poverty; these, in turn, can exacerbate health problems. Mercy Corps Northwest and Multnomah County Health Department are collaborating on LIFE Plus to improve incarcerated women’s opportunities for self-employment, success in regular employment, and health outcomes, and eventually to decrease recidivism. LIFE Plus integrates public health and economic development systems through the following components: 1) microenterprise training for incarcerated women that incorporates business plan development, employment skill-building, and practical tools for mental and physical health self-management, 2) post-incarceration support for employment, health, and other community services, 3) community action through coalition partnerships to support economic well-being and health for the formerly incarcerated, and 4) evidence-gathering to support policy changes and agency practice. Funding for this project has come from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, Northwest Health Foundation, the United Way of the Columbia-Willamette, Multnomah County Department of Community Justice, and private philanthropic sources. Contact: Julie Maher, PhD, julie.e.maher@state.or.us.

Mental Health

Nak-Nu-Wit: In partnership with Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board and Native American Rehabilitation Association, this project is investigating the outcomes of an integrated and culturally-relevant system of mental health services for urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children and youth, ages 9-21. Contact: Eleanor Gil-Kashiwabara gilkashi@pdx.edu.

Oregon Partnership for Health Integration (OPHI). OPHI is a joint project of Cascadia Behavioral Healthcare, Outside In and the PSU Regional Research Institute. Adults with high behavioral health needs (Quadrants II & IV) and no primary care are eligible to enroll. OPHI provides primary health care through the Outside In medical van integrated with mental health and wellness services from Cascadia. Care is coordinated through a mental health nurse, and the wellness services are provided by a team of peer wellness coaches. Project goals include reducing the prevalence of chronic physical and behavioral health challenges of participants, especially people who are homeless and/or experience co-occurring addiction and mental health challenges. RRI is conducting an evaluation of OPHI outcomes and processes. Key outcomes being tracked include: Program satisfaction and overall sense of wellness, mental health symptoms, substance use, tobacco use, BMI, waist circumference, breath CO levels, cholesterol, and blood glucose. Funding is provided by the US Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (Grant ID#SM60850). The grant period is October 2012 through September 2016.  Contact: Renee Boak, Project Director; Renee.boak@cascadiabhc.org; Lead Evaluator: Karen Cellarius, cellark@pdx.edu, (503) 725-4112

Pathways to Positive Futures Research and Training Center: This Center is conducting ground-breaking research to identify and test interventions addressing major social determinants that impede the transition-to-adulthood success of young people with mental health issues. Numerous partnerships are underway with state agencies, community mental health and other system of care service providers, consumer organizations across the nation involved in identifying and testing multi-level approaches to reduce educational, employment, and health care inequities facing these young people. Contact: Janet Walker janetw@pdx.edu.

Nutrition & Fitness

Connecting Neighborhoods, Nutrition, and Developmental Origins of Disparities in Obesity-Related Health: This study developed neighborhood measures for cohort of new mothers in the Oregon Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) and examines environmental and social predictors of maternal and child health indicators. Funding: Collins Medical Trust. Contact:  Janne Boone-Heinonen boonej@ohsu.edu.

Life Course Impacts on Obesity and Health Disparities: Integration of Perinatal Health: Using Kaiser Permanente electronic medical record data, this project will test if race/ethnic differences in markers of biologic obesity susceptibility may be driven by inequities in maternal behaviors and health status prior to and during pregnancy, and identify public health targets that can mitigate the cycle of trans-generational health disparities. The project is funded by OHSU's K12 award: Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women’s Health (BIRCWH). Contact: Janne Boone-Heinonen boonej@ohsu.edu.

SHIFT (Safety & Health Involvement for Truckers): SHIFT is a weight loss and health promotion intervention for truck drivers. The intervention is a weight loss competition that is supported with computer-based training, weekly weight and behavior logging, and motivational interviewing.  Olson and his collaborators are currently conducting a randomized controlled trial of the effectiveness of the SHIFT program with funding from the NHLBI (R01HL105495).  Part of the study involves measuring how social support and stress, at home and at work, moderate the effects of the SHIFT intervention.

The Comparative Effectiveness of Telemedicine to Detect Diabetic Retinopathy Project: CDC-funded Prevention Research Center, the Center for Healthy Communities at Oregon Health & Science University (U48DP002673) This project will determine the comparative effectiveness of telemedicine to traditional surveillance methods for detecting diabetic retinopathy. It will address three critical gaps in knowledge: 1) the efficacy for detecting diabetic retinopathy with telemedicine versus traditional surveillance methods; 2) the health behavior factors related to receiving annual diabetic eye examinations with telemedicine and traditional surveillance methods; and 3) the cost-effectiveness of telemedicine and traditional surveillance methods. www.oregonprc.org.

Tribal BRFSS Project I.H.S.: Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (U26IHS300415). This study will conduct telephone interviews and collect BRFSS data of interest to a Pacific Northwest tribe. Two projects will look at 1) Health behaviors associated with colorectal cancer screening: Using data collected from a Northwest Tribe BRFSS project, 2009-2010, this study will (a) quantify the prevalence of behavioral risk factors associated with colorectal cancer among Tribe A’s members age 18 and older compared to the Non-Hispanic White (NHW) population in Washington State, (b) quantify the prevalence of recent colorectal cancer screening among Tribe A members age 50 and older compared to the NHW population in Washington State, and (c) identify key variables associated with recent colorectal cancer screening using logistic regression modeling.  2) Neighborhood food options, diet, and body habitus: This study proposes to address a void in the American Indian/Alaska Native health literature while testing a new approach to the assessment of food environment. Working collaboratively with Tribe A, a nonreservation-based American Indian community, we will evaluate the neighborhood food environment of tribal members using the Retail Food Environment Index system. www.npaihb.org

Race & Ethnicity

Dissemination, Implementation and Evaluation of Native STAND in AI/AN Communities: This dissemination and implementation program will train and support American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) health educators from 50 tribes and tribal organizations nationwide to implement Native STAND, a theory-guided, evidence-based sexual health curriculum that reflects the unique needs and experiences of tribal youth.  Utilizing the RE-AIM framework, we will employ methods to measure the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation fidelity, and maintenance of the curriculum between tribal organizations who receive active vs. passive levels of technical assistance.  Our evaluation measures will characterize the systems serving AI/AN youth and inform improvements in the delivery of health education programs in Indian Country. For more information contact William Lambert, lambertw@ohsu.edu 

Nak-Nu-Wit: In partnership with Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board and Native American Rehabilitation Association, this project is investigating the outcomes of an integrated and culturally-relevant system of mental health services for urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children and youth, ages 9-21. Contact: Eleanor Gil-Kashiwabara gilkashi@pdx.edu.

Native Children Always Ride Safe NCMHHD: CDC-funded Prevention Research Center, the Center for Healthy Communities at Oregon Health & Science University  (R24MD002763): The Native Children Always Ride Safe project is a 5-year study that aims to design and evaluate interventions to improve child safety seat use in tribal communities. Each community designs their own interventions to meet their specific needs. Interventions include child safety seat education programs and clinics, safety seat technician training, child safety seat tribal code change, and a comprehensive multi-media awareness campaign including flyers, brochures, posters, press releases, newspaper advertisements, billboards, and video and radio PSAs. www.oregonprc.org.

Native VOICES Adaptation I.H.S.: CDC-funded Prevention Research Center, the Center for Healthy Communities at Oregon Health & Science University (U26IHS300290). The Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board will adapt a CDC-recognized intervention, Video Opportunities for Innovative Condom Education and Safer Sex (VOICES), and evaluate its effectiveness as an HIV/STD prevention resource for AI/AN teens and young adults 15-29 years old. www.oregonprc.org.

Noise-induced Hearing Loss Prevention Project: CDC-funded Prevention Research Center, the Center for Healthy Communities at Oregon Health & Science University (U48DP001937): The primary goal of this project is to present a community-wide, culturally-acceptable and sustainable hearing loss prevention campaign to Native communities in the Northwest. The campaign presents a fun, hands-on program about protecting hearing to fourth and fifth-grade students and to their community as a whole. We hope to help the children develop new and positive attitudes toward protecting their hearing. The community may help sustain those positive attitudes and behaviors into their futures. www.oregonprc.org; www.cdc.gov/prc.

Tribal BRFSS Project I.H.S.: Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board (U26IHS300415). This study will conduct telephone interviews and collect BRFSS data of interest to a Pacific Northwest tribe. Two projects will look at 1) Health behaviors associated with colorectal cancer screening: Using data collected from a Northwest Tribe BRFSS project, 2009-2010, this study will (a) quantify the prevalence of behavioral risk factors associated with colorectal cancer among Tribe A’s members age 18 and older compared to the Non-Hispanic White (NHW) population in Washington State, (b) quantify the prevalence of recent colorectal cancer screening among Tribe A members age 50 and older compared to the NHW population in Washington State, and (c) identify key variables associated with recent colorectal cancer screening using logistic regression modeling.  2) Neighborhood food options, diet, and body habitus: This study proposes to address a void in the American Indian/Alaska Native health literature while testing a new approach to the assessment of food environment. Working collaboratively with Tribe A, a nonreservation-based American Indian community, we will evaluate the neighborhood food environment of tribal members using the Retail Food Environment Index system. www.npaihb.org

Sexual Health

Dissemination, Implementation and Evaluation of Native STAND in AI/AN Communities: This dissemination and implementation program will train and support American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) health educators from 50 tribes and tribal organizations nationwide to implement Native STAND, a theory-guided, evidence-based sexual health curriculum that reflects the unique needs and experiences of tribal youth.  Utilizing the RE-AIM framework, we will employ methods to measure the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation fidelity, and maintenance of the curriculum between tribal organizations who receive active vs. passive levels of technical assistance.  Our evaluation measures will characterize the systems serving AI/AN youth and inform improvements in the delivery of health education programs in Indian Country. For more information contact William Lambert, lambertw@ohsu.edu 

Native VOICES Adaptation I.H.S.: CDC-funded Prevention Research Center, the Center for Healthy Communities at Oregon Health & Science University (U26IHS300290). The Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board will adapt a CDC-recognized intervention, Video Opportunities for Innovative Condom Education and Safer Sex (VOICES), and evaluate its effectiveness as an HIV/STD prevention resource for AI/AN teens and young adults 15-29 years old. www.oregonprc.org.

Transwomen Connected: a mobile app delivered HIV prevention program
MPI: Charles Klein, Tamara Kuhn, Christina Sun
During the past two decades, the HIV epidemic has severely impacted transgender women in the United States. Transgender persons have the highest HIV incidence of any risk group, and discrepancies between self-reported prevalence and HIV testing data indicate that many HIV-infected transgender women are not aware of their HIV status. The U.S. National HIV/AIDS Strategy notes that transgender persons are at high risk for HIV infection and yet efforts specifically targeting transgender populations have been minimal. To date there are no evidence- based HIV prevention programs that have been developed for and evaluated with this population. To fill this unmet need this project will develop a mobile app delivered multimedia interactive HIV prevention and sexual health promotion program developed for transgender women that delivers the intervention as a series of interactive activities tailored to the user. All activities will include gender affirmation and opportunities for social support. When complete, the resulting product will provide a cost effective HIV/STI intervention that can be implemented with transgender women across diverse settings with fidelity, while increasing uptake and effective delivery by appealing to the target audience on their mobile device and ultimately reducing new HIV/STI infections among transgender women.

Women

Astoria Women’s Heart Health Initiative: Cohort Development: In this study we are recruiting women 20-69 years of age residing in the Clatsop County (Astoria and Warrenton), Oregon into a cohort and collect baseline measures.  It will serve as the basis for a series of multicomponent community interventions to prevent, treat and manage heart disease. Funding: OCTRI Catalyst Pilot Grant, Oregon Community Foundation, OHSU Office of Strategic Outreach. Contact: Janne Boone-Heinonen boonej@ohsu.edu.

Connecting Neighborhoods, Nutrition, and Developmental Origins of Disparities in Obesity-Related Health: This study developed neighborhood measures for cohort of new mothers in the Oregon Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) and examines environmental and social predictors of maternal and child health indicators. Funding: Collins Medical Trust. Contact:  Janne Boone-Heinonen boonej@ohsu.edu.

Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) PRAMS is a survey of a stratified random sample of women (with oversampling of minority women) about 3 months after a live birth. Responders are re-interviewed (PRAMS-2) when their child is 2 years old. PRAMS and PRAMS-2 ask about a wide range of perinatal and toddler questions including breastfeeding, maternal depression, child developmental screening, smoking, income, stressful life events and social support. For more information, contact Program Director: Ken Rosenberg, Oregon Public Health Division; ken.d.rosenberg@state.or.us.

Policy Advisory Towards Health (PATH for women) addresses the critical need for broad-based and current evidence-based information to empower policymakers and the public to support decisions that ensure the best possible health outcomes for all women in our region. This program has provided data critical to women’s health and health care to legislative policymakers and community partners in order to improve critical benchmarks in health and to support the development of effective policies and programs. PATH for women is a strategic partnership between the OHSU Center for Women’s Health (CWH) and Portland State University’s Women, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Department (WGSS). The strategic partnership serves to advance women’s health policy research that identifies high priority women’s health indicators in Oregon and then provides relevant, accurate, high-quality research reports that inform women’s health policy decision-making and interventions to the local community based health service provider and coalitions of community organizational level. Contact: Jamie P. Ross, rossj@pdx.edu

Transwomen Connected: a mobile app delivered HIV prevention program
MPI: Charles Klein, Tamara Kuhn, Christina Sun
During the past two decades, the HIV epidemic has severely impacted transgender women in the United States. Transgender persons have the highest HIV incidence of any risk group, and discrepancies between self-reported prevalence and HIV testing data indicate that many HIV-infected transgender women are not aware of their HIV status. The U.S. National HIV/AIDS Strategy notes that transgender persons are at high risk for HIV infection and yet efforts specifically targeting transgender populations have been minimal. To date there are no evidence- based HIV prevention programs that have been developed for and evaluated with this population. To fill this unmet need this project will develop a mobile app delivered multimedia interactive HIV prevention and sexual health promotion program developed for transgender women that delivers the intervention as a series of interactive activities tailored to the user. All activities will include gender affirmation and opportunities for social support. When complete, the resulting product will provide a cost effective HIV/STI intervention that can be implemented with transgender women across diverse settings with fidelity, while increasing uptake and effective delivery by appealing to the target audience on their mobile device and ultimately reducing new HIV/STI infections among transgender women.

Youth

Advancing Social Communication & Play (Funded by a Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences): This multi-university (led by University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill), randomized control trial examines the efficacy of a social communication and play intervention for preschoolers with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) implemented within their public school preschool classroom.  Preschool education teams randomly assigned to the intervention condition provide direct intervention to the children; they are coached in the model throughout the academic year by the research team.  For more information, please contact Amy Donaldson; adonald@pdx.edu

Community Capacitation Center of the Multnomah County Health Dept. The Community Capacitation Center conducts community-based participatory research and empowerment evaluation about a range of topics of interest to the communities we serve.  Our research agenda includes: 1) the influence of training methodology on the roles Community Health Workers (CHWs) play; 2) the relationship between the roles CHWs play and their efficacy; 3) the relationship between culturally-centered CHW curricula and positive changes in CHWs, their families and their communities; and 4) the role of CHWs in preventing and reducing violence affecting young people. Contact: Dr. Pei-ru Wang; pei-ru.wang@multco.us

Connecting Neighborhoods, Nutrition, and Developmental Origins of Disparities in Obesity-Related Health: This study developed neighborhood measures for cohort of new mothers in the Oregon Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS) and examines environmental and social predictors of maternal and child health indicators. Funding: Collins Medical Trust. Contact:  Janne Boone-Heinonen boonej@ohsu.edu.

Dissemination, Implementation and Evaluation of Native STAND in AI/AN Communities: This dissemination and implementation program will train and support American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) health educators from 50 tribes and tribal organizations nationwide to implement Native STAND, a theory-guided, evidence-based sexual health curriculum that reflects the unique needs and experiences of tribal youth.  Utilizing the RE-AIM framework, we will employ methods to measure the reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation fidelity, and maintenance of the curriculum between tribal organizations who receive active vs. passive levels of technical assistance.  Our evaluation measures will characterize the systems serving AI/AN youth and inform improvements in the delivery of health education programs in Indian Country. For more information contact William Lambert, lambertw@ohsu.edu 

Nak-Nu-Wit: In partnership with Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board and Native American Rehabilitation Association, this project is investigating the outcomes of an integrated and culturally-relevant system of mental health services for urban American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children and youth, ages 9-21. Contact: Eleanor Gil-Kashiwabara gilkashi@pdx.edu.

Native Children Always Ride Safe NCMHHD: CDC-funded Prevention Research Center, the Center for Healthy Communities at Oregon Health & Science University  (R24MD002763): The Native Children Always Ride Safe project is a 5-year study that aims to design and evaluate interventions to improve child safety seat use in tribal communities. Each community designs their own interventions to meet their specific needs. Interventions include child safety seat education programs and clinics, safety seat technician training, child safety seat tribal code change, and a comprehensive multi-media awareness campaign including flyers, brochures, posters, press releases, newspaper advertisements, billboards, and video and radio PSAs. www.oregonprc.org.

Native VOICES Adaptation I.H.S.: CDC-funded Prevention Research Center, the Center for Healthy Communities at Oregon Health & Science University (U26IHS300290). The Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board will adapt a CDC-recognized intervention, Video Opportunities for Innovative Condom Education and Safer Sex (VOICES), and evaluate its effectiveness as an HIV/STD prevention resource for AI/AN teens and young adults 15-29 years old. www.oregonprc.org.

Noise-induced Hearing Loss Prevention Project: CDC-funded Prevention Research Center, the Center for Healthy Communities at Oregon Health & Science University (U48DP001937): The primary goal of this project is to present a community-wide, culturally-acceptable and sustainable hearing loss prevention campaign to Native communities in the Northwest. The campaign presents a fun, hands-on program about protecting hearing to fourth and fifth-grade students and to their community as a whole. We hope to help the children develop new and positive attitudes toward protecting their hearing. The community may help sustain those positive attitudes and behaviors into their futures. www.oregonprc.org; www.cdc.gov/prc.

Pathways to Positive Futures Research and Training Center: This Center is conducting ground-breaking research to identify and test interventions addressing major social determinants that impede the transition-to-adulthood success of young people with mental health issues. Numerous partnerships are underway with state agencies, community mental health and other system of care service providers, consumer organizations across the nation involved in identifying and testing multi-level approaches to reduce educational, employment, and health care inequities facing these young people. Contact: Janet Walker janetw@pdx.edu.

SocialsibS (Funded by an Autism Speaks' Treatment Grant: Pilot Level): This project examines the effects of a sibling-mediated intervention on the social engagement of young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and their families.  The intervention combines sibling mediation and video modeling intervention methods to target specific social communication goals.  As the study is completed within the PSU Speech and Language Clinic, it also investigates the effects of an apprenticeship model of pre-professional training for speech-language pathology graduate students serving children with ASD.  For additional information, please contact: Amy Donaldson; adonald@pdx.edu.

Violence

Bound by the State: Re-Centering survivors amidst professionalization, criminalization and structural violence
Co-PIs: Stephanie Wahab, Gita Mehrotra, Ericka Kimball

We are examining the ways that  that neoliberalism, criminalization, and professionalization create a "braid" that shapes and constrains the kind of work made im/possible in DV research and praxis. In this study, we explore the complexities of how the braid is both reinforced and resisted through a state-mandated DV advocate training. Our research engages case study methodology, specifically, a single case with embedded units with the aim to provide deeper insights into the ways that influential macro forces shape DV advocacy training in Oregon.  A feature of case study research is the engagement with multiple data sources to deepen understanding and bolster data credibility. Consequently, we engaged a policy analysis of federal and state policy documents for HB 3476 (State legislation conferring confidentiality privilege to DV advocates who complete the training). We also engaged a qualitative content analysis of the OCDVSA online training, and participant observation of the online training by going through the 40-hour training. Finally, we collected and analyzed semi-structured qualitative interviews with community stakeholders and triangulated the analyses of each method. 

Community Capacitation Center of the Multnomah County Health Dept. The Community Capacitation Center conducts community-based participatory research and empowerment evaluation about a range of topics of interest to the communities we serve.  Our research agenda includes: 1) the influence of training methodology on the roles Community Health Workers (CHWs) play; 2) the relationship between the roles CHWs play and their efficacy; 3) the relationship between culturally-centered CHW curricula and positive changes in CHWs, their families and their communities; and 4) the role of CHWs in preventing and reducing violence affecting young people. Contact: Dr. Pei-ru Wang; pei-ru.wang@multco.us