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Faculty


School of Community Health Faculty


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Carlos J. Crespo, Dr.P.H., M.S.
Professor of Community Health and Director, School of Community Health

Phone: (503) 725-5120
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: ccrespo@pdx.edu

Curriculum Vitae

B.S. 1980 Inter American University; M.S. 1986 Texas Tech University; Dr.P.H. 1989 Loma Linda University

Dr. Crespo's previous work experience includes working for the State University of New York at Buffalo as an associate professor and as a researcher at Roswell Park Cancer Institute as well as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the National Center for Health Statistics. His responsibilities included survey planning and development of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. He also worked as a public health analyst for the Office of Prevention, Education and Control of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute at the National Institutes of Health. He was an assistant professor at American University in Washington D.C.

His main area of research involves the epidemiology of physical activity in the prevention of chronic diseases and research on minority health issues. He has over 60 publications in the areas of exercise, minority health, obesity and nutrition, and is co-author of five textbooks on minority health and sports medicine. He is also a contributing author to more than ten government publications, including the "Surgeon General's Report on Physical Activity and Health," and the "Sixth Report on Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of Hypertension." He received the 1997 Secretary of Health Award for Distinguished Service as part of the Salud para su Corazon campaign, and in 2003 became a Minority Health Scholar at the National Institutes of Health. He is an emeritus board member of the American Council for Exercise, former member of the board of directors of CASA de Maryland, and past president of the mid-Atlantic regional chapter of the American College of Sports Medicine. Currently he serves as a senior technical adviser for the Montgomery County Latino Health Initiative, CDC external advisory committee for the First International Physical Activity and Public Health Conference, and is a WHO/PAHO consultant for the Latin American Obesity Prevention Initiative.


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Gary R. Brodowicz, Ph.D.
Professor of Community Health

Phone: (503) 725-5119
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: brodowiczg@pdx.edu

 

B.S. 1977 University of Michigan; M.A. 1981 Wake Forest University; Ph.D. 1986 Ohio State University

Dr. Brodowicz's academic interest areas include exercise, fitness, physical activity, and measurement. He is a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), a member of the American Physiological Association, and an honorary member of the Japanese Society of Sports and Osteopathic Therapy. Dr. Brodowicz served on the Oregon Governor's Council for Physical Fitness and Sports, and has been involved with the Oregon Coalition for Promoting Physical Activity. A certified ACSM health/fitness director, he regularly works with the YMCA as a consultant for their exercise specialist workshops and certification exams, and continues to be involved in fitness assessment workshops for the Japanese Athletic Trainers Association for Certification (JATAC). He has served on the editorial board of the American College of Sports Medicine's Health and Fitness Journal, and also reviews manuscripts for The Journal of Aging and Physical Activity and The Journal of Athletic Training. Undergraduate courses include Exercise Physiology, Exercise Testing Techniques, and Quantitative Analysis in Health Studies; graduate courses include Physical Activity, Health, and Disease; Exercise, Nutrition, and Performance; Quantitative Research Design and Analysis; and Exercise and Women: Physiological Aspects. Dr. Brodowicz advises master's students undertaking thesis and project work related to exercise, fitness, and physical activity. He is also director of the exercise physiology laboratory and the ON TRAC fitness assessment service.


Paula Carder, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor

Phone: (503) 725-5144
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: pdx03498@pdx.edu

Paula Carder, Ph.D. is an assistant professor at the Institute on Aging and School of Community Health at Portland State University. She studies senior housing and community-based services, including state efforts to support affordable assisted living facilities, the use of negotiated risk agreements, and medication policies and practices in assisted living. She has authored several journal articles and book chapters on assisted living practices and programs. Dr. Carder is currently on the medication management workgroup for the CEAL-UNC Community-Based Participatory Research Partnership and the planning committee for the Assisted Living Disclosure Collaborative coordinated by CEAL and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. She teaches courses in long-term care policy and qualitative research methods.


 

 Alexis Dinno, Sc.D., M.P.H, M.E.M

Assistant Professor of Community Health
Phone: (503) 725-3076
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: alexis.dinno@pdx.edu

Alexis Dinno is an assistant professor of community health at Portland State University. Dr. Dinno earned both a M.E.M. and a M.P.H. from Yale University and an Sc.D. from the School of Public Health at Harvard University where her research unpacked the relationships between urban residential property abandonment and elderly experiences of depression in New Haven, CT using both multilevel modeling techniques, and loop analyses of causal feedback. Before coming to PSU, Dr. Dinno was an Adjunct Professor at California State University East Bay, where she taught epidemiology to graduate and undergraduate students, and developed new methods in applied multivariate statistics. Dr. Dinno was a Postdoctoral Research Fellow at the University of California, San Francisco Center for Tobacco Control Research and Education. Her broad areas of interest include social epidemiology, social ecology and quantitative modeling. In addition to her work in community health, Dr. Dinno is an avid capoeirista. She teaches graduate courses in epidemiology, environmental health and biostatistics.


Cara Eckhardt, Ph.D.
Assistant Professor of Community Health
Phone: (503) 725-4569
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: c.eckhardt@pdx.edu

Cara L. Eckhardt, Ph.D. is a nutrition epidemiologist. Before joining the PSU faculty, Cara was a post-doctoral research fellow at the International Food Policy Research Institute in Washington DC, where her work focused on the overlap of obesity and micronutrient malnutrition in women from countries undergoing the nutrition transition. Dr. Eckhardt also completed a pre-doctoral traineeship at the Carolina Population Center at UNC-Chapel Hill, which included additional training in demography and a focus on interdisciplinary collaborations to address population-based research. Dr. Eckhardt’s publications include articles addresarsing infant feeding and growth, growth patterns in children from less-developed countries, obesity, and the nutrition transition occurring in middle-income countries. Dr. Eckhardt teaches courses in Global Health and Epidemiology.


 


Kelly Gonzales, Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Community Health
 
Phone: (503) 725-5108
Fax: (503) 725-5100 
E-mail: kelly.gonzales@pdx.edu

 

Dr. Gonzales, an enrolled member of the Cherokee Nation, is an assistant professor of community health at Portland State University, where she teaches Healthy People-Health Place and Native Health. Her research uses a multi-level approach to examine health disparities, particularly those related to diabetes, among reservation- and urban-based American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations. These disparities can be seen in many facets of health care including diabetes control, retention and adherence, the therapeutic relationship, and the provision of medical care. Dr. Gonzales’s work examines the role of psychological stress, specifically discrimination, in the emergence and perpetuation of these specific kinds of disparities. Primarily, she has explored the influence of discrimination within the context of health care settings, and community-based demonstration projects among AI/ANs for diabetes prevention and cardiovascular risk reduction. Her work also examines the psychometric characteristics of discrimination measures, and the ways that discrimination is conceptualized and experienced among AI/ANs.

Dr. Gonzales completed a two-year post-doctoral research training program at the University of Colorado Denver Native Elders Research Center, administered by the Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health. She has served as board member elect and co-chair for the Native Research Network, Inc. Native American Youth and Family Services (NAYA) also selected her to participate in the leadership development training program for emerging Oregon-Native leaders. All of her work is guided by strong, active partnerships with AI/AN communities and organizations.

 

 


 

Betty Izumi, Ph.D, MPH, RD

Assistant Professor of Community Health
Phone: (503) 725-5102
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: izumibet@pdx.edu

Dr. Izumi completed both her RD and MPH at the University of California Berkeley and her Ph.D from Michigan State University. Her areas of interest include sustainability, nutrition, the built environment, community-based food systems, health disparities, and community-based participatory research. Before coming to PSU she was a Research Fellow at the Kellog Health Scholars Program at the University of Michigan School of Public Health. Dr. Izumi has also served as an Assistant Professor of Family and Community Development at Oregon State University. She is currently teaching Public Health Nutrition and Food System Sustainability.

 

Rick Lockwood, Ph.D, MPH

Senior Instructor
Phone: (503) 725-9089
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: lockwood@pdx.edu

Dr. Lockwood is a Senior Instructor and member of the full-time teaching faculty of the School of Community Health in the College of Urban & Public Affairs.  With qualifications in Systems Science & Sociology, Health Policy & Administration and Experimental Psychology, he uses a transdisciplinary approach to explain the dynamics of health & health care.  His extensive work in industry includes survey research firms, general hospitals, surgical practices and mental health facilities; experiences that augment his lessons.  Dr. Lockwood has taught more than a dozen different graduate and undergraduate courses, including Social Research Methods, Quantitative Research Design & Analysis, Integrative Health and Systems Thinking, Health Behavior & the Social Environment, Global Health, Health & Health Systems, Careers in Health & Health Care, and the Political Economics of Alternative Medicine.  Dr. Lockwood regularly participates in the mentorship of top students through independent research abroad.  Recent examples include mentored research in South Africa; Cuba; rural Ghana; Kampala, Uganda; Mumbai, India; and Sucre, Peru.  Several of his students have been accepted to competitive graduate programs, including; Emory, Simon Frasier, Northwest College of Natural Medicine, Tulane, The New School, University College London and the University of Liverpool.  He has an active mentoring agenda with minority students, having worked with McNair Scholars and the NIH funded programs Bridges to Baccalaureate Program, and BUILDEXITO.  His service to the University also includes mentoring students of the Honors College thesis program.  Dr. Lockwood won the distinction of Outstanding Teacher of the Year for 2012-13, and sadly, came in second for 2014-15.

 

 


 


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Leslie McBride, Ph.D.  

Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs

OHSU – PSU School of Public Health 

Professor of Community Health 

Phone: (503) 725-8137 

Fax: (503) 725-5100 
E-mail: mcbridel@pdx.edu

Leslie McBride, PhD, is Interim Associate Dean for Academic Affairs in the OHSU – PSU School of Public Health. From 2008 until 2012, she served as Associate Vice Provost for Teaching, Learning, and Assessment, directing related programs in the Center for Academic Excellence, PSU’s faculty development center. Dr. McBride teaches courses on planning and evaluation, sustainability and health, and a research seminar in mindbody health and integrative medicine. Her recent publications have focused on the scholarship of teaching and learning in health promotion; faculty learning communities; academic portfolio development; curricular and faculty development for sustainability; and social sustainability. She is a founding editorial board member for Pedagogy in Health Promotion: The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning. In her past role as chair of the School Health Education and Services Section within the American Public Health Association, Dr. McBride helped develop a national action plan for comprehensive school health education. She has provided evaluation and assessment support to Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory, the Healthy Communities Initiative for the Portland Tri-Counties Community Care Network, the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine, and PSU’s Institute for Nonprofit Management. 

Dr. McBride received her B.S. (Speech Pathology/Audiology) and M.Ed. (School Health Education) from the University of Missouri, Columbia, and her Ph.D. (Education, emphasis Community Health) from Southern Illinois University.

Jane Mercer, M.S.
Undergraduate Adviser

Phone: (503) 725-5104
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: mercerj@pdx.edu

M.S.T. 1986 (physical education), Oregon Basic Teaching Credential 1987 Portland State University; B.A. 1983 (physical education), California
Basic Teaching Credential 1983 Humboldt State University

Jane began working within the School of Community Health (formerly the Department of Health and Physical Education) in 1986 as a graduate teaching assistant. Since earning her Master's degree she has taught many courses for the school, including many fitness courses, as well as the lecture course Development and Management of Health Fitness Programs. The course that she thoroughly enjoys and has been teaching for the past ten years is Health Promotion Disease Prevention. In addition to her teaching duties, Jane is currently co-coordinator of the undergraduate and graduate internship programs. She is one of our undergraduate academic advisers and also works with current K-12 teachers who are working toward adding a Health or Physical Education Endorsement.


Lynne C. Messer, Ph.D., M.P.H.
Assistant Professor  

MPH 1995 Health Behavior and Health Education; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
PhD 2005 Epidemiology; University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Lynne Messer is a social and reproductive / perinatal epidemiologist whose work focuses developing environmental and neighborhood measures to address maternal and child health disparities. Her research interests include women's and children's health, social epidemiology, perinatal and reproductive epidemiology and health disparities. Her methodological work includes better-defining neighborhood environments, developing environmental exposure measures for infant mortality outcomes and addressing the limits of causal inference in observational studies. She is also interested in the psychosocial mechanisms through which socio-environmental exposures result in health disparities for women and children. Dr. Messer teaches Epidemiology, Health and Social Inequalities, and Women's Health.

Prior to her current position, Dr. Messer was an Assistant Research Professor in the Center for Health Policy and Inequalities Research at Duke University (2008-2012) and a postdoctoral scientist in the Epidemiology and Biomarkers Branch of the Human Studies Division at the Environmental Protection Agency (2005-2008). She received her B.S. in Community Health Education at the University of Oregon.

 


 

Randy A. Miller, M.S.T. 

Director of Service Course Programs in Physical Education
Phone: (503) 725-5118
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: millerr@pdx.edu

B.S. 1989, M.S.T. 1992 (exercise science) Portland State University

Primary area of interest is human movement studies, specifically strength training across the gender and age classifications. Currently serving a three-year term as the National Strength and Conditioning Association state director for Oregon, Mr. Miller is a certified strength and conditioning specialist. He has worked with individuals from pre-adolescent to geriatric ages, and athletes from junior high to the professional level. His current interest is in using strength training to prevent injuries and promote better performance.


Margaret Neal, Ph.D.
Director, Institute of Aging
Professor of Community Health

Phone: (503) 725-5145
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: nealm@pdx.edu

Dr. Neal's interests are in gerontology, survey research, program development, and evaluation, particularly as related to work-family issues, family caregiving, terminal care, and assessment of quality of care. Additional research interests center around older workers, lifelong learning, and planning for retirement. She has received several grants and written numerous articles, book chapters, and two books (Balancing Work and Caregiving for Children, Adults, and Elders (Sage, 1993), and Work and Caring for the Elderly: International Perspectives (edited with Viola Lechner, 1999, Taylor & Francis). Presently, she and Leslie Hammer (Department of Psychology) are co-authoring a book concerning dual-earner couples in the sandwiched generation. The book is based on the results of a national longitudinal study conducted with funding from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation (http://www.sandwich.pdx.edu) and involving the collection and analysis of qualitative and quantitative data from working couples caring both for dependent children and aging parents (forthcoming, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates). Dr. Neal teaches courses in the Graduate Certificate in Gerontology program, the Master of Public Health program, and the doctoral programs in urban studies and public administration and policy.


 


Dawn M. Richardson, DrPH, MPH

Assistant Professor

Phone: (503) 725-2051
Fax: (503) 725-5100

E-mail: drichar2@pdx.edu

M.P.H. 2002 Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine

Dr.P.H. 2010 University of California, Berkeley

Dawn M. Richardson is an Assistant Professor of Community Health at Portland State University. Dr. Richardson’s research is influenced by community-based participatory research principles and explores neighborhood context as a social determinant of health. Specifically, she examines how the neighborhood environment is conceptualized and measured, and how neighborhood characteristics influence and perpetuate health disparities among urban youth as they transition to adulthood. She is particularly interested in the use of participatory spatial and visual methods to capture the social, economic, and physical aspects of neighborhoods that impact health with the aim of developing place-based interventions in response. Dr. Richardson teaches Urban and Community Health and Global Health.

Prior to her current position, Dr. Richardson held a post-doctoral training position as a Kellogg Health Scholar at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, where she worked closely with a community-based participatory research partnership examining the effects of the social and physical environment on cardiovascular health disparities in Detroit. 

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Karen Seccombe, Ph.D.
Professor of Community Health

Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: seccombek@pdx.edu

M.S.W. 1981 University of Washington; Ph.D. 1985 Washington State University

Dr. Seccombe's primary research interests focus on poverty, welfare use, and social inequality and the structure of the U.S. health care system. Her work includes attention to the antecedents and consequences of health insurance coverage for individuals and families, gendered experiences within the family and health care systems, the use of health services among the poor, and the social construction of illness. Her teaching interests include families, health systems, and poverty, inequality, and social welfare policy. She is the author of So You Think I Drive a Cadillac?: Welfare Recipients' Perspectives on the System and its Reform, Marriages and Families: Relationships in Social Context, Families in Poverty, Just Don't Get Sick: Access to Health Care in the Aftermath of Welfare Reform and Families and Their Social Worlds.


Judith L. Sobel, Ph.D.
Associate Professor of Community Health

Phone: (503) 725-5112
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: sobelj@pdx.edu

B.A. 1975 University of California, Santa Cruz; M.A. 1977, Ph.D. 1981 (mass communications theory and methodology) University of Minnesota; M.P.H. 1983 University of California, Los Angeles

Over the course of her career she has focused her work on designing and evaluating public health campaigns, particularly those campaigns that utilize mass media. Before joining the faculty at Portland State University she conducted health communication research at the Health Behavior Research Institute at the University of Southern California. Hearing loss prevention, breast and cervical cancer, and drug abuse prevention have been her specific research area interests. Currently, she is examining the effects of communication on adolescent hearing conservation in collaboration with the Oregon Hearing Research Center at Oregon Health & Science University. She teaches a graduate course in health communication as well as undergraduate courses in community health. Her coursework also includes a senior seminar in controversial health issues, and a sophomore inquiry course entitled Healthy People, Healthy Places.


Lawrence Wallack, Dr.P.H.
Dean, College of Urban and Public Affairs
Professor of Public Health

Phone: (503) 725-4043
E-mail: wallackl@pdx.edu

B.A. 1972 (urban studies) Franklin and Marshall College; M.S. 1974 (alcohol studies) University of Arizona; M.P.H. 1978, Dr.P.H. 1982 University of California, Berkeley

Dr. Wallack's primary interest is in the role of mass communication, particularly the news media, in shaping public health issues. His current research is on how public health issues are framed in print and broadcast news. He is principal author of Media Advocacy and Public Health: Power for Prevention (Sage Publications, 1993) and News for a Change: An Advocate's Guide to Working with the Media (Sage Publications, 1999). He is also co-editor of Mass Communications and Public Health: Complexities and Conflicts (Sage, 1990). He has also published extensively on topics related to prevention, health promotion, and community interventions. Specific content areas of his research and intervention work have included alcohol, tobacco, violence, handguns, sexually transmitted diseases, cervical and breast cancer, affirmative action, suicide, and childhood lead poisoning.


Liana Winett, Dr.P.H., M.C.H.E.S
Associate Professor

Graduate Field Experience Coordinator
Phone: (503) 725-8262
E-mail: lwinett@pdx.edu

Liana Winett is Associate Professor in the School of Community Health and Graduate Field Experience Coordinator for the OMPH Program Health Promotion Track (PSU).  She teaches graduate-level courses in Media Advocacy, Mass Communication for Public Health, Program Evaluation, and Health Behavior Theory.  Prior to her work at PSU, including serving as Director of the collaborative Oregon MPH Program, she was Research Coordinator for the Berkeley Media Studies Group.

Dr. Winett’s research uses qualitative and quantitative content analysis methods to explore portrayals of public health and health policy in popular discourse, and in particular, the news media.  Her work has included focus on interpersonal violence; breast, cervical and prostate cancers; childhood lead poisoning; California’s Three Strikes incarceration initiative; the anthrax/bioterrorism scares of 2001; Oregon’s Measure 7; major causes of death in Oregon; and H1N1 influenza.

Dr. Winett holds a DrPH in Health Education from UC Berkeley, and an MPH in Behavioral Science and Health Education from UCLA.


Belinda Zeidler, M.S.T.
Undergraduate Adviser

Phone: (503) 725-5104
Fax: (503) 725-5100
E-mail: zeidlerb@pdx.edu

B.S. 1981 (anthropology), M.S.T. 1986 (exercise science) Portland State University

Belinda has enjoyed teaching health and nutrition at Portland State University for over twenty years. Her current focus areas include general nutrition/weight management and school health. She recently had the opportunity to work with the Beaverton School District on both the health and physical education curriculum adoption committees, and she continues to volunteer in the district where her two children attend school.

Belinda has also worked in the community as a health promotion specialist, implementing work-site wellness programs for insurance companies, lumber mills, school districts and other organizations. Belinda is one of two undergraduate academic advisers for the School of Community Health. She really enjoys working with students and helping them achieve their educational and career goals. In her free time, she attends all of her children's sporting events, loves to garden, travel and walk her dog.