Summer 2020 Classes

6/22 - 7/19 FIRST FOUR WEEK CLASSES

TOP: PSY OF ADDICTIVE BEHAVIOR   4 credits

PSY 410.001  

CRN 80900

MTWR 0915-1135

Instructor: Cynthia Mohr

cdmohr@pdx.edu

Psychology of addictive behavior comprises an area of study devoted to investigating and understanding psychological components of a variety of addictive behavior, which typically include: alcohol and alcoholism, drug use and abuse, eating disorders, smoking and nicotine addiction, and other excessive behaviors (e.g., gambling). With a better understanding of the pathways to addiction, researchers hope to develop better prevention and intervention strategies to help mitigate the significant problem.
This course is designed to provide you with an understanding of contemporary perspectives on contributing factors and pathways to use of substances, as well as treatment-related issues. There is a growing interest in other addictive behaviors, such as gambling, which may follow similar trajectories and have common causal pathways. In class, we will discuss readings and engage in active learning exercises to consider various aspects of addictions behavior in-depth. Consequently, classroom attendance and active engagement is essential for comprehensive appreciation of the material.

7/20 - 8/16 SECOND FOUR WEEK CLASSES

SOCIAL RELATIONSHIPS & GROUPS   4 credits 

PSY 343.001 

CRN 80897

ONLINE/WEB

Instructor: Dara Shifrer

dshifrer@pdx.edu

 

Examination of sociological and psychological processes associated with interpersonal, group, and inter-group behavior. Particular emphases on aggression, pro-social behavior, interpersonal attraction, group influence, conflict and cooperation. 

COGNITION   4 credits

PSY 348.001 

CRN 81598   

MTWR 0915-1135

Instructor: Heather Wild

wild@pdx.edu

Processes by which we form representations of reality, and strategies we use for manipulating those representations in order to explore possible actions and outcomes. Includes topics in perception, attention, memory, imagery, language, comprehension, problem solving, creative thinking, judgment, reasoning, and decision making.

7/20 - 8/02 TWO WEEK CLASSES

TOP: PARANORMAL PSYCHOLOGY   4 credits

PSY 410.002 

CRN 80901

ONLINE/WEB

Instructor: Larry Martinez

lm5@pdx.edu

This course will evaluate the psychological theories, phenomena, and explanations for paranormal experiences including but not limited to ghosts, possessions, aliens, demons, out of body experiences, and psychic/telekinetic abilities.

DIVERSITY, PREJUDICE, & INTERGROUP RELATIONS   4 credits

PSY 428.001 

CRN 81335

MTWRF 0800-1115

Instructor: Kimberly Kahn

kimbkahn@pdx.edu

Delves into social psychological research and theory on Prejudice, Diversity, and Intergroup Relations. From a social psychological perspective, it addresses both historical and contemporary perspectives on stereotyping, prejudice, and discrimination, including implicit bias, modern racism, social identity threats, and benevolent sexism. Example topics include the impact of prejudice in policing, education, work organizations, online mediums, and health care. The course also focuses on ways to reduce prejudice and counteract bias.

6/22 - 8/16 EIGHT WEEK CLASSES

PSYCHOLOGY AS A SOCIAL SCIENCE   4 credits

PSY 204.001  

CRN 81333

MW 0915-1135

Instructor: Marcus Sharpe

msharpe@pdx.edu  

Explores human individuality and the social context of behavior. Topics include intelligence, personality, motivation, social psychology, coping with stress, and psychological disorders. Describes theories and research findings in the context of social issues and introduces students to challenges of psychological measurement. Recommended as a first psychology course for both majors and nonmajors.

PERSONAL DECISION MAKING   4 credits  

PSY 300U.001  

CRN 81585

ONLINE/WEB

Instructor: Ursina Teuscher

ursina@pdx.edu

How to make wiser decisions. Ways to think more creatively and more logically in making both everyday choices and major life decisions. Instruction and hands-on experience.

PSYCHOLOGY OF WOMEN  4 credits

PSY 310U.001 

CRN 81582

TR 0915-1135

Instructor: Lee Knox

knoxl@pdx.edu

Review and evaluate assumptions underlying psychological research on women. Survey the research in areas such as the development of sex differences, acquisition of gender roles and maintenance of gender stereotypes. Explore the pertinence of these findings to topical areas such as women's work roles, women and mental health, and the women's movement.

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT   4 credits

PSY 311U.001 

CRN 80894

TR 0915-1135

Instructor: Julia Dancis

jdancis@pdx.edu

Development of the individual across the lifespan, from conception to death. Surveys the biological bases and social contexts of developmental processes (e.g., cognitive, social, emotional development). Implications of research for education, parenting/family relations, and social policy. 

PERSONAL AND SOCIAL ADJUSTMENT   4 credits

PSY 317.001  

CRN 81579

MTWR 1145-1250

Instructor: Karen Chenier

kchenier@pdx.edu  

Traces the course of normal adjustment with special interest in those factors which are instrumental in shaping human behavior. Concepts such as emotional maturity, psychological stress, and maladjustment are considered.

RESEARCH METHODS IN PSYCHOLOGY   4 credits  

PSY 321.001  

CRN 80896

TR 1145-1405

Instructor: Joel Steele

j.s.steele@pdx.edu

Study of methods for evaluating the quality of psychological measurements, including various concepts of reliability and validity, and item analysis techniques; common sources of invalidity in the interpretation of psychological data; strategies of selecting and analyzing observations which minimize these sources of invalidity.

    COUNSELING   4 credits  

    PSY 350.001  

    CRN 81576

    MW 1300-1520

    Instructor: Casey Campbell

    casec@pdx.edu

    A survey of counseling and interviewing procedures, contributions of psychological theory to counseling techniques.

    TOP: CROSS CULTURAL PSYCHOLOGY   4 credits  

    PSY 410.004 

    CRN 81557

    ONLINE/WEB

    Instructor: Deborah Brannan

    brannan@pdx.edu

    An introduction to the field of cross-cultural psychology is offered with focus developmental processes along with an emphasis on the social and psychological impact of race, ethnicity, culture, gender, and age. Moreover, this course examines some of the ways in which human perception, thinking, feeling, striving and relating to others are conditioned by cultural membership. Included is a consideration of the contributions of work in cross-cultural psychology in such areas as education, training for cultural awareness, development across the life span, gender issues and the understanding and treatment of psychopathology.

    TOP: PSYCHOLOGY OF HAPPINESS & WELL-BEING  4 credits  

    PSY 410.005 

    CRN 81578

    MW 1300-1520

    Instructor: Christopher Allen

    challen@pdx.edu

    The goal of this course is to understand & experience teachings on happiness & subjective well-being that comes from psychological science & related psychological & philosophical theories. You will engage in a series of challenges designed to increase your own happiness & build more productive habits. The course focuses on misconceptions about happiness, features of the mind that lead us to think the way we do, & the research that can help us increase subjective well-being. Students will ultimately be prepared to understand the science of happiness & successfully utilize specific wellness activities into their lives. 

    TOP: MARRIAGE & INTIMATE RELATIONSHIPS   4 credits  

    PSY 410.006 

    CRN 81580

    MW 1800-2020

    Instructor: Tatiana Snyder

    tatiana@pdx.edu

    This course is designed to explore psychological processes and dynamics of close relationships. The purpose of this course is to provide an overview of current theory and research in the field of close relationships, emphasizing practical implications for our own relationships whenever possible. In addition, we will discuss community, societal institutions, and culture as contexts in which relationships are embedded. Topics that would be discussed include: intimacy, attraction, friendship, love, dating, sexuality, jealousy, traditional and non-traditional relationships, marriage, parenting, communication and conflict resolution, balancing work and family, domestic violence, power, divorce, remarriage and blended families.

    TOP: CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY  4 credits  

    PSY 410.007 

    CRN 81584

    TR 1645-1905

    Instructor: Cindy Marino

    cmarino@pdx.edu

    The course will introduce the field of Clinical Psychology, reviewing the primary activities of clinical psychologists such as - assessment, diagnosis, and treatment of mental disorders. Topics are considered in the context of cultural considerations and ethical concerns. Sub-fields of clinical psychology are distinguished, including forensic psychology, health psychology, neuropsychology, and research.

    TOP: FORENSIC PSYCHOLOGY   4 credits  

    PSY 410.008 

    CRN 81586

    ONLINE/WEB

    Instructor: Tracy Powell

    trpowell@pdx.edu

    Explores the relationship between the study of psychology and law. Specifically, how psychological practice, research, and theory can be utilized by law enforcement, courts, and others involved with the justice system to help arrive at appropriate decisions regarding such issues as incarceration, treatment, guilt and innocence. In addition, topics related to expert testimony, psychopathic deviance, criminal investigation, risk assessment, and child sexual abuse and custody determination will be examined.

    TOP: PSYCHOLOGY OF EATING DISORDERS  4 credits  

    PSY 410.009 

    CRN 81599

    ONLINE/WEB

    Instructor: Gregory Neimeyer

    neimeyer@pdx.edu

    Eating Disorders provides an introduction to the characteristics and criteria associated with a variety of forms of disordered eating. We cover anorexia nervosa, bulimia, binge eating disorders, and overeating, among others, and overview key features of their causes, presentation, and treatment. Special attention is dedicated to understanding eating disorders in women, men, athletes, and multicultural populations. Attention is given to critical factors in the development and maintenance of eating disorders. These include personality features and family characteristics, as well as sexual orientation, sociocultural, genetic, and family influences.

    INFANT DEVELOPMENT   4 credits  

    PSY 459U.001  

    CRN 81577

    MW 1145-1405

    Instructor: Jeslin Hancock

    jeslin@pdx.edu

    Development of the individual from conception to age two. Theory and research pertaining to infant development.