Events

COVID-19 in Latin America: Various Approaches with Distinct Outcomes
Tuesday, May 26, 2020 - 2:00pm to Tuesday, May 26, 2020 - 3:30pm
COVID-19 in Latin America: Various Approaches with Distinct Outcomes

International & Global Studies presents this virtual Zoom panel discussion where three specialists on Latin America will discuss the responses by Mexico, Cuba, Brazil and Argentina to the COVID-19 pandemic. Important lessons that transcend epidemiology may be drawn from their divergent outcomes. There will be an opportunity for Q&A with the panelists. 

May 26, 2020 at 2 PM - 3:30 PM
Zoom link to join the panel discussion: https://pdx.zoom.us/j/93862823688
Please let us know if you plan on attending! RSVP here


The panelists will include:

Leopoldo Rodriguez chairs the Department of International and Global Studies at Portland State University. An economist by training, his work includes market reforms and financial crises, migration and informality, and rural development and agroecology. His regional expertise is Latin America, with special focus on Argentina.

Shawn Smallman is a Professor of International and Global Studies at Portland State University. He received his PhD in history from Yale University and is the author of three critically acclaimed academic books, Fear and Memory in the Brazilian Army and SocietyThe AIDS Pandemic in Latin America, and (with Kim Brown) An Introduction to International and Global Studies.  

Elliott Young is Professor in the History Department at Lewis and Clark College. Dr. Young is the author of Alien Nation: Chinese Migration in the Americas from the Coolie Era through WWIICatarino Garza’s Revolution on the Texas-Mexico Border, and co-editor of Continental Crossroads: Remapping US-Mexico Borderlands History, and a forthcoming book “Forever Prisoners: How the United States Built the Largest Immigrant Detention System in the World.” He is co-founder of the Tepoztlán Institute for Transnational History of the Americas. He has also provided expert witness testimony for over 250 asylum cases.