Detailed Program






Breakout Session #1 | Thursday, 3:30 PM

 

1A: Room 327. Building the Case for Street Design that Supports Health

Open streets helps make the case for walking and biking facilities that encourage physical activity every day.  For communities with limited investment in bicycle and pedestrian networks, open streets can ignite the hunger for more biking and walking, and visibly point out health benefits to leaders in the community.  This presentation will discuss how to build support for street as places that support community and health.  We will share examples from Minneapolis Open Streets to help make the direct connection between street design and opportunities for healthy and active streets.

Dana Dickman

Dana Dickman is a Principal with Alta Planning + Design. She has worked in bicycle and pedestrian planning, design and research for 15 years. She specializes in policy and planning that strengthen the connection between health, physical activity and active transportation. Dana works in rural, suburban, and urban environments and strives to create policy and plans that define the clear connection between diverse transportation options and healthy places.

Colin Harris

Colin Harris is a civil engineer and urban designer with over ten years of experience building active streets. In 2009, Colin co-founded the Minneapolis Bicycle Coalition and became inspired to start a local Open Streets initiative. After many months of planning and organizing, the first Open Streets Minneapolis event took place in 2011. Colin continued to lead the initiative and grew it to eight annual events in 2015.


 

1B: Room 338. Surveying Participants: Lessons from Viva Calle San Jose 2015 (San Jose)

We present a simple, inexpensive method to survey Open Streets participants, discussing question wording and strategies for administering the survey. Results from a survey at Viva Calle San Jose 2015 demonstrate the method. Learning takeaways from this session include: 1) High-quality survey data can provide an invaluable tool to attract funding and local government support for Open Streets events, 2) High-quality survey data helps event planners improve subsequent Open Street events, 3) Most people running Open Street events have limited training in survey design and administration, so they will appreciate a carefully-designed model that they can copy or adapt.

Asha Weinstein Agrawal

Dr. Agrawal is director of the MTI National Transportation Finance Center and professor of urban and regional planning at San José State University. Her research and teaching interests in transportation policy and planning include pedestrian and bicycle planning, travel behavior and opinion surveys, and transportation finance. She earned a BA from Harvard University, an MSc from the London School of Economics and Political Science, and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

Dr. Pratt will review the evolution of open streets or ciclovía programs in Latin America over the past four decades with an emphasis on factors that are associated with sustainability. While the differences between well established municipal programs in Latin American cities and open streets start-ups in the US may seem stark, taking a longer view provides perspective on what may be expected in different stages of development of these programs. Many of the current challenges faced by US programs were evident in Latin America as well. The experiences of Latin American cities in addressing these challenges may prove useful as US programs expand.

Michael Pratt

Dr. Pratt is the director of the Institute for Public Health at the University of California, San Diego. He was previously the Senior Advisor for Global Health and Chief of the Physical Activity and Health Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Dr. Pratt has also been a visiting professor at Emory University, the Schools of Medicine and Government at los Andes University in Bogotá, Colombia and at the Federal University of Pelotas in Brazil. He completed a Masters Degree in exercise physiology and MD at the University of Washington, preventive medicine residency at the Mayo Clinic and CDC, Masters in Public Health at the University of Minnesota, and is a graduate of the CDC EIS epidemiology fellowship. Dr. Pratt's research interests include increasing global research capacity for physical activity, physical activity policy and interventions, and evidence-based public health.

1B: Room 338. Evidence from 125 U.S. Open Streets

In collaboration with 8 80 Cities and Robert Wood Johnson Foundation we have conducted a thorough review of all US Open Streets and will provide details from the 125 unique programs held in the US. We conducted a thorough Internet and Social Media review of these programs, which includes dates, route lengths, location of routes, programming, day of the week, frequency, duration, organizer, funder, and reported attendance. We believe it will be informative and helpful to understand the breadth of programs in the US and discuss pros and cons of reported metrics.

J. Aaron Hipp

J. Aaron Hipp, PhD, is an Associate Professor of Community Health and Sustainability at NC State University. He has conducted Open Streets evaluations and research since 2010, visiting six US Open Streets, as well as programs in Mexico, Chile, and South Africa. He is a member of the 8 80 Open Streets Network of Champions.

Alyssa Bird

Alyssa Bird holds a Bachelors Degree in environmental studies from Carleton University and is a graduate from the University of Toronto’s Graduate Program in Planning where she was a CIHR Fellow in Public Health Policy. Alyssa is currently managing 8-80 Cities’ “Opening our Streets for Sport and Recreation in Ontario” grant to help communities in Ontario start their own Open Streets initiatives as inexpensive and accessible health promotion programs.


 

1C: Room 328. Open Streets: Challenging the Paradigm of Mobility (Cape Town)

During the past three years, Open Streets Cape Town (OSCT) has been funded on an experimental basis to trial Open Streets Days. These have been enthusiastically received by public and government alike. In the process OSCT has established positive relationships with relevant City departments. As a result we have received a grant from WWF to develop a framework to test the concept more broadly (in other communities), find economies of scale and embed the programme in the City so that it can become aligned with existing policies.

Marcela Guerrero Casas

Born and raised in Bogota, Colombia, Marcela is passionate about cities and public space. Marcela holds a master's in public administration and international affairs from Syracuse University and has worked in policy and advocacy for over a decade. Marcela moved to Johannesburg in 2006 and worked in Zimbabwe, Swaziland and Kenya before moving permanently to Cape Town in 2011. In 2012, Marcela co-founded Open Streets Cape Town.

1C-1: Room 328. Over the Goal Line! Overcoming Partnership Challenges (San Jose)

In this session, you will hear from a panel of partners from San Jose's Viva CalleSJ Open Streets program. The discussion will feature representatives from the City of San Jose’s Department of Parks, Recreations and Neighborhood Services and Police Department as well as the primary non-profit partner, Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition. This comprehensive panel will discuss their experience learned from the development, planning, and implementation of the inaugural Viva CalleSJ. Join us and hear from all the angles, learn the ins and outs, pitfalls, best practices, and policy making guidelines.

Brian Clampitt
Beginning his career with the City of San José in 1989, Brian Clampitt has served the residents of San Jose for over 25 years.  Currently, he is an Event Coordinator with the City of San José's Department of Parks, Recreation and Neighborhood Services "Placemaking Team." Most recently, he co-lead the planning and implementation of Viva CalleSJ, San Jose's return to Open Streets programs.
Carlos Velazquez

Carlos Velazquez served as one of the outreach managers for the City of San Jose's inaugural Viva CalleSJ Open Streets program in 2015, and will again assist for the 2016 edition of the program. Full time, he is the Outreach Manager for Silicon Valley Bicycle Coalition (SVBC), where he oversees media and communications, recruits and works with volunteers, and strengthens SVBC’s membership base. Carlos has previously worked with the Illinois Humanities Council, Chicago Youth Centers, and San Jose-based Latino theatre company Teatro Vision. He is thrilled to actively work to get more people on bikes and out on the streets to help make the Bay Area a vibrant, healthy, and accessible region for all.

Liutenant Tommy Troy

Lieutenant Tommy Troy has 21 years in law enforcement, 18 of which have been with the San Jose Police Department. During his tenure with San Jose, Tommy has worked in Special Operations, Family Violence, Burglary and Homicide. Tommy currently heads the Permits, Medical Marijuana, and Secondary Employment division, where he oversees the staffing of most of the city of San Jose's outdoor events. He recently facilitated the cohesion of law enforcement, other city divisions, and various community groups for San Jose's open street event: Viva Calle San Jose.


1C-2: Room 329. The Portland Sunday Parkways Story (Portland)

Portland Sunday Parkways has a long track record of success with a sustained and growing program. The 6 key elements include direct community organizing with communities of concern, sophisticated and effective communications, sustainable funding with agencies and sponsors, robust volunteer program with volunteer leaders, artful event design with 4 marketplaces/parks, and City agency cooperation and support for traffic control and permitting. This case study will be presented by the 4 main players that implement and manage Sunday Parkways with 27 years of cumulative experience.

Linda Ginenthal

Linda Ginenthal is the architect of Portland’s Sunday Parkways which began in 2008 and is the current program manager for these five wildly popular events held monthly during the summer. She currently co-chairs the 2016 International Open Streets Summit.

Rich Cassidy

Rich Cassidy has been instrumental in designing Sunday Parkways' programming and logistics since year one. He is a senior transportation planner with the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation.  A graduate of Portland State University’s Masters in Urban Planning, he has worked for the City for 32 years, the last 24 years developing programs promoting biking, walking, transit and carpooling.  He is a year-round bike commuter and also organizes the City’s Ten Toe Express walking program.

Alexis Gabriel

After earning her MBA in marketing and a Masters in International Environmental Policy in sustainable development at Middlebury Institute of International Studies, she pioneered out to Portland where she fell in love with transportation. She now works as the Communications and Community Engagement Manager for the City of Portland’s SundayParkways program that brings out 100,000+ people annually to enjoy physical activity, embrace public space, and promote civic engagement and economic development. Excited for opportunities to drive positive change, she volunteers across Portland as a certified Master Recycler, serves on the Emerging Leaders Board (OEC), and volunteers with Women in Transportation. Find her on Twitter @KarmaKapitalist.

Neal Armstrong

Neal is a seasoned event and volunteer management professional with 12 years experience and over 115 large-scale events produced. He enjoys designing and executing creative, efficient and budget-conscious operation plans that build successful, memorable and sustainable events.  Neal’s professional goals are to create and sustain fun and productive partnerships with non-profit and for-profit clients. The relationship is paramount in his approach to business.

 1C-3: Room 333. Planning Open Streets from within City Government: Stories from 3 Cities (Windsor, San Jose, Long Beach) 

This session will show the ways different cities are implementing Open Streets from within city government.  It will identify the origins of the programs: what was the rationale? It will also highlight the challenges & opportunities for hosting their open streets program including: What is the relationship with different stakeholders within the public sector (i.e. police, transit, etc.)? How to develop strategies to build consensus; and, discuss the lessons learned throughout the process and hear what the panel would do differently in the future.  Questions from the audience will be encouraged!

Ed Solis
Ed Solis is a life long public servant with over 25 years of experience in the field of recreation. Over the last 16 years, Ed Solis has worked for the City of San Jose’s Department of Parks, Recreation, and Neighborhood Services (PRNS) helping to serve some of the roughest neighborhoods in San Jose. Currently, Ed is the Recreation Superintendent, leading the newly established Placemaking Team, which  implements Placemaking based programs, such as the Viva CallSJ Open Streets program. 
 
Michael Cooke

Michael Cooke has worked for the City of Windsor, Ontario Planning Department for more than 25 years and he currently holds the position of Manager of Planning Policy. He has held sessional positions at the University of Windsor teaching courses on housing policy and recreation planning. Michael has welcomed the opportunity to chair the Open Streets Windsor Steering Committee which has been tasked to deliver the city’s first ever open streets event in 2016. 

Tasha Day

Tasha Day is the Manager of the Special Events and Filming for the City of Long Beach and has been with the department for the past 16 years and in the events industry for 20 plus years. Under her rein, the office was awarded the 2015 Outstanding Film Commission of the Year, beating out Chicago Film Office, Film in Iceland, Oregon Governor’s Office of Film & Television, and the Royal Film Commission of Jordan.

Alyssa Bird

Alyssa is an urban planner, health promoter, lover of small towns and instigator of big adventures. Alyssa manages the Open Streets portfolio at 8 80 Cities – a international non-profit focused on walking, cycling, and community engagement.  In 2015 Aly was named one of three "under 30s" to watch in Toronto for her leadership with Open Streets Toronto.


 




Breakout Session #2 | Friday 8:30 AM

 

2A: Room 338. Creative Open Streets Engagement Strategies to Enhance Equity and Low Income Communities (Oakland)

Oakland’s Love Our Neighborhood Day made many adjustments over three years that highlight how the local community is evolving to enhance inclusiveness. The presentation analyzes changes over time and implications of who participated/dropped as stakeholders; changes in the program from a business or economic development and climate change education strategy to a social connection and community building strategy; shifting of sponsorships, memberships, swag, fundraising, volunteer opportunities and activities that encourages equitable participation and representation.

Chris Hwang

Chris is the Board President of and has served on the WOBO Board since 2008, overseeing the initiation, management and evaluation of Oaklavia since its inaugural event in 2010 and the subsequent six open streets events. Her professional experience spans more than 20+ years in public health. WOBO gives Chris opportunities to advocate for change to make Oakland a healthier place to live. Chris serves as a Commissioner on the City of Oakland Bicyclist and Pedestrian Advisory Commission.

2A: Room 338. Forward Together: Increasing Diversity and Inclusion Through Open Streets (New Brunswick)

There are a plethora of cities that host Open Streets programs without the active involvement and participation of minority and low-income residents, or University faculty, staff and students that live proximate to or are impacted by the route itself. This session will highlight lessons learned from focus groups with Black and Hispanic residents that live proximate to the NB Ciclovia; share findings from a survey of nearly 2,000 Rutgers University faculty, staff and students; and discuss critical next steps to remove barriers and thus improve overall diversity and inclusion in the Ciclovia.

Charles Brown

Mr. Brown is a senior researcher with the Alan M. Voorhees Transportation Center (VTC) and adjunct professor at the Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy at Rutgers University. He has 15 years of public and private sector experience in urban and regional planning, public policy, and research. He has also extensive experience in community development having worked with municipal, county, and state government agencies, for-profits, and non-profit organizations in three states.

Jaymie Santiago

Jaymie Santiago, MPAP, serves as President of New Brunswick Tomorrow – a nonprofit in the city of New Brunswick, NJ – dedicated to improving quality-of-life issues. In this most important role, Jaymie fosters collaborations with key stakeholders and influencers to understand and respond to the health, human service and education needs of city residents; generating ideas aimed at affect neighborhoods and engaging underserved, inner-city youth.

2B-1: Room 328. Canada's Capital Sunday Bike Days (Ottawa)

Every Sundays from May to September 90 km of parkways are closed to traffic for a car-free day for, cyclist, joggers, and in-line skaters. Through the presentation, the challenges and lessons learned in managing the program within an urban setting as well as in a natural and wildlife environment will be examined. From a practitioner’s point of view we will look at how the program is run. The process of elaborating the 10 year strategic plan and how we ran a workshop to re-imagine the program by involving key players from all walks of life within the community will be presented.

Bruce Devine

Bruce Devine is a Senior Manager with the National Capital Commission and has more than 25 years of management experience with major special events. He provides leadership for site use of all Capital urban parks, parkways and pathway. His team annually issues over 250 event permits, ranging from major to regional events. He also manages the operations of the Rideau Canal Skateway and the Sunday Bike Days programs, both of which contribute to visitors’ experience of the Capital.

 


2B-1: Room 328. How-To's, Positive Impacts, Challenges, and Lessons Learned from Hosting Events in National Parks (Washington DC)

Active transportation in National Park sites offer many benefits to visitors and parks. Visitors get a unique experience in an iconic landscape, while engaging in outdoor activity. NPS can use these events to alleviate congestion and encourage climate-friendly travel options. This presentation will include: 1) NPS case studies highlighting motivations, challenges, benefits, and impacts. Case studies locations could include Acadia, Mt. Rainier, Crater Lake, Glacier, Rock Creek  and Great Smoky Mountains. 2) Engaging the audience on ideas for overcoming challenges and promoting expansion of the events to other NPS sites.

Laurie Miskimins

Laurie is a transportation planner for FHWA-Federal Lands Highway. She has worked in a broad set of capacities to improve bicycle access to and within Federal Lands. She is currently assisting the NPS in researching and documenting Open Streets events in National Parks, in hopes of encouraging other parks to start such events. Before working for FHWA, Laurie worked at PBOT interning in the Active Transportation branch.

Erica Simmons

Erica  is a community planner at the U.S. Department of Transportation’s Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, where she supports active transportation, sustainability, and long-range planning projects for the National Park Service, Federal Highway Administration, and other Federal agencies. Before coming to Volpe, Erica was an open space planner for the Midpeninsula Regional Open Space District, a regional conservation agency in the San Francisco Bay Area.

Krista Sherwood

Krista is a Transportation Planner for the National Park Service (NPS), working in the Washington, DC Office Transportation Branch. Her work portfolio includes providing program and policy support to NPS regions and parks on transportation partnership efforts that enhance connections between National Park units and their surrounding communities. Prior to NPS, Krista's worked for the Metropolitan Planning Organization in Texas and the Federal Highway Administration in Maryland.

2B-2: Room 333. Your Street. Your Day. Centering Community At Open Streets (San Francisco)

Hear from Sunday Streets Programming & Partnership Director about pivots in outreach and programming strategy for Bayview/Hunters Point, one of San Francisco’s most underserved communities. Learn how the changes transformed perception of the event from an outsider’s program to a platform that community stakeholders can use to celebrate black culture and neighborhood history. Following the case study, participants will share outreach and organizing strategies in a facilitated discussion.

Katy Birnbaum

As Director of Programming and Partnerships and a community organizer at heart, Katy leads the effort on ensuring that each event is a true community resource for all participants whether they be neighborhood residents, local merchants, community organizations, city agencies or non-profits. Since graduating summa cum laude from SFSU in 2010, Katy has used her communications skills to increase the reach and impact of various political and community groups in the Bay Area.


2C: Room 329. Confessions of an Open Streets Newbie (Macon)

In 2015, Rachel Hollar and David Moore were selected as Emerging City Champions through 8 80 Cities and Knight Foundation. This fellowship equipped them with the networks and resources to help create a healthier, safer, more vibrant Macon. The duo will discuss how they engaged diverse stakeholders to support their vision of an Open Streets program in Macon, Ga. With the energy from a downtown revitalization movement and a burgeoning bike advocacy group, they leveraged an $8000 budget and partnerships with the local government, nonprofits, and media professionals to bring this program to life.

Rachel Hollar

Rachel is a Mercer University graduate, with a B.A. in Social Entrepreneurship, Psychology, and Spanish. After graduation, she served one year as an English instructor in Thailand through Teach Thailand Corp. Rachel now serves as the Director of Operations for Susan G. Komen Central Georgia, overseeing all aspects of the organization’s local breast health outreach, education, and grant making. She is also the leader and founder of Bike Macon, Macon's first grassroots bike advocacy group.

David Moore

David Moore can be described as an aspiring urbanist and a city nerd with a passion for food, culture, and civic service. In 2014, he received his B.A. in American Studies and Urban and Regional Planning from Miami University. David resides in Macon, Ga and serves as a Project Manager at NewTown Macon overseeing revitalization projects, aiding entrepreneurs and real estate developers, and creates events and strategies to promote Downtown Macon as a vibrant place.

2C: Room 329. How Do You Save Money? A Live Crowd-Sourcing Workshop 

Open Streets programs cost money but budgets can vary between a few thousand dollars per date to hundreds of thousands dollars! In this workshop we want to gather cost-saving lessons from your Open Streets planning experiences to help others to save money when planning new Open Streets programs or for those looking to make their programs more affordable. Results of this workshop will be made into an open-sourced tool that will be available following the Summit.

Alyssa Bird

Alyssa is an urban planner, health promoter, lover of small towns and instigator of big adventures. Alyssa manages the Open Streets portfolio at 8 80 Cities – a international non-profit focused on walking, cycling, and community engagement.  In 2015 Aly was named one of three "under 30s" to watch in Toronto for her leadership with Open Streets Toronto.


2D: Room 327. City of Portland - Portland in the Streets Permitting (Portland)

Traditionally cities have viewed streets primarily as the domain of the automobile. Even in Portland, city code defines the purpose of right-of-way as being dedicated to the movement of vehicles, pedestrians and/or goods. In recent years, grassroots initiatives have sprouted up across town to enhance neglected and underutilized right-of-way space as places for gathering, gardening, sharing resources and artistic expression. The City of Portland is now embracing the shift towards viewing streets as valuable public places and is working to make it easier to foster community use in the right-of-way by evolving the regulatory tools for planning, permitting, managing and maintaining community initiated improvements. This session will offer practical solutions that could be applied in your city.

Christine Leon

As lead of PBOT’s Development Permitting & Transit Group, Christine oversees management and development on and around the largest city asset, the public right of way, as well as the operation of the Portland Streetcar and Portland Aerial Tram. Christine helped redesign public works permitting in 2010 and helped reshape development on local residential streets by launching new flexible design standards in 2012. She led the effort for successful change to the Oregon vehicle code to allow for shared streets. Her group is currently leading the development of a Neighborhood Streets Program and Livable Streets Strategy for PBOT. She is spearheading a transformation from a vehicle-trip to person-trip methodology for the bureau.

Denver Igarta

Denver Igarta is a Senior Planner with the City of Portland Bureau of Transportation. He works on a range of transportation policy, street design initiatives and pedestrian, bicycle, transit and freight planning efforts.  He served as one of the principal authors of the Portland Bicycle Plan for 2030. His recent assignments include staffing a high-capacity transit study and managing the update of Portland’s 20-year Transportation System Plan.  He completed his graduate studies at the University of Dortmund, Germany and the University of the Philippines.

2D: Room 327. Goldilocks and Streets: What's "Just Right" for You? (Los Angeles)

Sometimes, the best thing to do is to go long, bold and brazen. Take over 18 miles of streets and make the biggest splash you can. Other towns might be better off starting small - one to two miles. What's right for your town? How do you know? What's the best way to start off? This interactive and engaging workshop will offer a give and take of ideas and a range of ideas for any community.

Aaron Paley

Aaron Paley is President and Co-founder of Community Arts Resources (CARS) and the former Executive Director and Co-founder of CicLAvia. Since 1988, Paley, and business partner Katie Bergin, have propelled CARS to become a leading innovator in the activation of public space through content-driven programming, ephemeral interventions and new models for design. He received a B.A. in Architecture from UC Berkeley and an M.B.A. in Non-Profit Arts Management from UCLA.

Mike Lydon

Mike is a Principal of The Street Plans Collaborative.  As an internationally recognized planner, writer, and advocate for livable cities, his work has been featured by NPR, The New York Times, CNN Headline News, Planetizen, Grist, Salon, Next City, Architect Magazine, and Streetsblog, among other publications. Along with Tony Garcia, He is the author of Tactical Urbanism: Short-term Action for Long-term Change. He is also the creator and primary author of the The Open Streets Project.




Breakout Session #3 | Friday 10:30 AM

 

3A: Room 327. Sunday Parkways and New Portlanders: Engaging Immigrants and Refugees in Open Streets

Portland is quickly diversifying with a population that is multi-lingual, multi-ethnic, and comes with not only a rich domestic perspective, but a global one. In contrast to Portland’s reputation, Portland is the 52nd biggest US city, but ranks 11th in refugee settlement, whereas one in five Portlanders are foreign-born. Sunday Parkways as a city-wide initiatives provides a unique opportunity to connect with communities across the city to bring them together for events that promote healthy living, transit options, and community development. This session will highlight the critical role Open Street plays in integrating immigrant and refugees into a city and connecting them with their neighbors and resources. Sunday Parkways staff and partners will discuss stories of successful partnerships, lessons learned, and best practices for developing and maintaining partnerships with immigrant and refugee communities. There will also be an information exchange workshop exercise.

Ronault "Polo" Catalani

Polo is the second of his Manado mother and Catalan father’s four sons. Their family was expelled from Indonesia and resettled in Salem. He is a 1983 Howard University, Reginald Heber Smith Community Law Fellow and a 1984 Fellow of the International Court of Justice. His undergrad and graduate work was in human migrations in the Netherlands, Egypt, Sudan, Iran, and Thailand. Polo has been an activist lawyer on the West Coast and Southeast Asia. Some of this work has made PBS Imaging America; WNET New York's Religion & Ethics; Wisconsin, Minnesota, and Oregon Public Radio. Articles have appeared in New York Times Sunday Magazine, The Wisconsin Journal, and The Oregonian. He is author of Counter Culture, Immigrant Stories from Portland Cafe' Counters, and has just written his 1000th column for the Northwest publication The Asian Reporter. Polo is staff advisor for the New Portlander Policy Commission.

Alexis Gabriel

After earning her MBA in marketing and a Masters in International Environmental Policy in sustainable development at Middlebury Institute of International Studies, she pioneered out to Portland where she fell in love with transportation. She now works as the Communications and Community Engagement Manager for the City of Portland’s SundayParkways program that brings out 100,000+ people annually to enjoy physical activity, embrace public space, and promote civic engagement and economic development. Excited for opportunities to drive positive change, she volunteers across Portland as a certified Master Recycler, serves on the Emerging Leaders Board (OEC), and volunteers with Women in Transportation. Find her on Twitter @KarmaKapitalist.

Janis McDonald

Janis McDonald has been a project manager for the City of Portland's Bureau of Transportation for 12 years. She effectively promotes active transportation, community, equity, health, and fun through her work with Safe Routes to School. In 2008, she helped organize the first Portland Sunday Parkways, going on to be the Community Engagement and Communication Manager from 2008-2013. In 2013, she joined the Portland Safe Routes to School team.

Som Subedi

Som coordinates the City of Portland Parks for New Portlanders, a program that provides culturally specific recreational activities like Portland World Cup Soccer (Youth from 30 countries, cultures and communities participated last year), New Portlanders Cultural Celebration & Family Day (Welcomed a Syrian family in the Park, first time in the United States’ history) and Intercultural Basketball for recently arrived immigrants and refugees. Som has presented a positive narrative of committed New Americans and has been recognize as a national leader for his groundbreaking work including being invited in the White House to testify on behalf of refugees and immigrants in 2014, testified in the U.S. Congressional offices, Washington D.C., and a City of Portland Spirit of Portland Award recipient in 2015.

 


 

3B: Room 328/9. Selling Open Streets: Effective Messaging (Portland)

Your boss not getting it? Resistance in the community? Many times its not what you are saying but how. Effective messaging begins by clarifying the ways that your idea connects to common values and being explicit about how it will benefit the community. In this interactive workshop, participants will develop their own powerful message and learn how to pitch it to leadership effectively.

Rex Burkholder

Rex Burkholder started the bicycling revolution in Portland as a founder of the Bicycle Transportation Alliance. Now leading an campaign to get kids outside to learn, Outdoor School for All. As Metro Councilor (2001-2013) he led efforts to reform regional transportation policy and address climate change. His work is recognized internationally, including as Global Ambassador for Ciclovia.  His book, The Activist’s Toolkit is highly praised for it’s practical and effective lessons.

3B: Room 328/9. Disappointment to Success: Growing Pains in Fort Collins (Fort Collins)

The City of Fort Collins will host Open Streets for the third year in 2016, following two successful events in 2015. But success followed the disappointing cancellation of the would-be second Open Streets in 2014. Increasing concerns from area residents and business prompted the cancellation. As a result, City staff dedicated resources to a proactive outreach campaign. Returning to the same location in 2015, participation grew more than 350%, business wants the event back, and City leaders are now at the table. This session will help participants learn from Fort Collins’ experience.

Nick Heimann

Nick's involvement with Open Streets began as a graduate course project to evaluate the event. He now leads the coordination of two Open Streets events each year with the City of Fort Collins FC Bikes Program. He also has experience and interest in program planning and evaluation, including Bike to Work Day events and on-street bike infrastructure.

3B: Room 328/9. The Policy Rationale Behind Open Streets from a Small City (Redding)

Want ideas to promote first steps toward a more livable city?  This workshop will examine ways to incorporate the policy rationale behind Open Streets into your program and city, so that you may advocate for lasting changes affecting transportation in your city or town.  Anne Thomas will describe how Shasta Living Streets developed a program in a small Northern California city to use Open Street events to help catalyze and support the long-term transformation of the way streets are perceived, experienced, and designed.

Anne Wallach Thomas

Anne Wallach Thomas is the Founder and Director of Shasta Living Streets a non-profit organization with a mission to promote a vision, share information, provide services, products and events, and engage with the community in collaborative efforts to develop better bikeways, trails, and walkable cities.


3D: Room 333. How Open Streets PHL Brought a New Idea to an Old City in 6 Months (Philadelphia)

We will explain how a global leader in Open Streets was brought to Philadelphia to give us advice and elevate our cause to a level we never expected. We’ll discuss our social media achievements (6,150 Facebook & 1,400 Twitter followers in less than 6 months) and how we received over 4,200 signatures on a petition to the new Mayor. We’ll discuss how traditional media helped to spread our message and how we keep our name in the news, lest any politicians forget we exist! Lastly, how our Group Organization and our approach to City Government helped us move this through at an accelerated pace.

Nate Hommel

Nate's primary goal in everything he does is to enhance urban quality of life. As the Director of Planning and Design at University City District (UCD) an Adjunct Professor at Philadelphia University and the Director of External Communications for Open Streets PHL he works toward this goal each day. He has a finger on the pulse of innovative placemaking, leading interventions such as parklets, ped plazas, or vibrant, public spaces he’s able to change the city from the bottom up.

Mike Lydon

Mike is a Principal of The Street Plans Collaborative.  As an internationally recognized planner, writer, and advocate for livable cities, his work has been featured by NPR, The New York Times, CNN Headline News, Planetizen, Grist, Salon, Next City, Architect Magazine, and Streetsblog, among other publications. Along with Tony Garcia, He is the author of Tactical Urbanism: Short-term Action for Long-term Change. He is also the creator and primary author of the The Open Streets Project.

 

Breakout Session #4 | Friday 2:30 PM

 

4A: Room 338. Changing to Healthy Habits through Ciclovia Recreativa (Santiago, Chile)

Ciclovías Recreativas generate significant changes in mental and physical health that for decades have not been managed by other strategies. These impacts include: increased connections among neighbors, more commuting by bike and on foot; increased physical activity among children, etc. Changes are encouraged through the following messages: “Be active, get out of your car, eat healthy”. These messages show results when the efforts focus on creating the conditions that allow people to take ownership of their city, and so naturally, adopt healthy lifestyles.

Gonzalo Aguayo Stierling 

Gonzalo is the Director of CicloRecreoVía. He has been a speaker at various conferences across Chile as well as in Bogotá, Medellin, Buenos Aires, Quito, Mexico City, Guadalajara, Lima, Rosario AR and others. He has promoted Ciclovías Recreativas in Peru and Conchabamba and been the coordinator of the first workshop on planning and program implementation of Ciclovías Recreativas in Bogota.

4A: Room 338. Cully Camina—Oregon Walkways

The Andadno en Bicicletas en Cully Group (ABC) wishes to unite the community with activities and events to spread awareness about the benefits of cycling. ABC also works to inform and support the community regarding pedestrian and cycling safety, and infrastructure issues. On this presentation ABC will explore the role of community to implement changes in a neighborhood and the importance of partnership with City and non-profits.

El grupo Andando en Bicicletas en Cully (ABC) desea unir a la comunidad a través de actividades y eventos para difundir conciencia sobre los beneficios del ciclismo. Así mismo, ABC trabaja para informar y apoyar a la comunidad en asuntos de infraestructura y seguridad peatonal y ciclista. En esta presentación miembros del grupo describirán el papel que tiene la comunidad para crear cambios en un vecindario y sobre la importancia de la colaboración entre la comunidad, ONGs y la ciudad.

Lale Santelises

Coming soon.

4A: Room 338. Guadalajara

Oscar Rodriguez

Óscar Alberto Rodríguez Alemán, Director of Guadalajara’s Vía RecreActiva, will share Best Practices on the development, promotion and operation for one of Mexico’s most successful regional Ciclovía programs. Vía RecreActiva consists of nine routes with a wide range of activities and classes throughout the program – children’s activity area, arts and music classes, dance and Zumba instruction, tours by bike, and oversize board games. His expertise in implementing this weekly program will include rules to follow for success, building support, coordinating all the logistics and communities involved as well as sharing tips and parameters for executing a better and more economical program.

4C: Room 333. Building Community Through Open Streets (San Francisco)

Join representatives from open streets programs in Portland and San Francisco. This interactive session will attempt to answer your questions regarding how to make your city's open streets event community minded. Topics covered will include: building a community of volunteers, working with government and community stakeholders, and business engagement. Come with questions, as we want to learn from open discussion.

Beth Byrne

Beth has spent the last decade working with and leading numerous nonprofit and political organizations in the San Francisco Bay Area. As Sunday Streets Program Director, she was responsible for ensuring that relationships with Sunday Streets' diverse network of supporters and partners made each event successful.

Neal Armstrong

Neal is a seasoned event and volunteer management professional with 12 years experience and over 115 large-scale events produced. He enjoys designing and executing creative, efficient and budget-conscious operation plans that build successful, memorable and sustainable events.  Neal’s professional goals are to create and sustain fun and productive partnerships with non-profit and for-profit clients. The relationship is paramount in his approach to business.

4C: Room 333. Strength in Numbers: Best Practices for Volunteer Recruitment (Los Angeles)

CicLAvia’s CommUNITY of dedicated volunteers is comprised of a broad range of individuals and organizations that reflect the diversity and talent of Los Angeles. There are many ways to get involved – route notification, bike repair, adopting an intersection, etc. The CicLAvia Team will share insight on how for more than five years and 18 events, the largest Open Streets event in the U.S. has been powered by everyday people. This interactive workshop will cover the fundamentals of effective outreach methods and community development programming geared for maintaining a strong volunteer base.

Henny Alamillo

As CicLAvia’s Director of Production, Rachel is responsible for implementing all event logistics before, during and after each event. She works closely with city departments to ensure a successful and safe CicLAvia. Additionally, she helps to oversee CicLAvia’s on-the-ground community engagement strategy, ensuring that the community’s input is reflected in CicLAvia’s event plans. Rachel's role also calls for working with community partners to produce day-of programs each event.

Rachel Burke

As CicLAvia’s Director of Production, Rachel is responsible for implementing all event logistics before, during and after each event. She works closely with city departments to ensure a successful and safe CicLAvia. Additionally, she helps to oversee CicLAvia’s on-the-ground community engagement strategy, ensuring that the community’s input is reflected in CicLAvia’s event plans. Rachel's role also calls for working with community partners to produce day-of programs each event.

Annette Lanzarotta 

Annette assists in all elements of pre-event production and day-of hub activity. She also coordinates the design and production of CicLAvia merchandise and runs the online store. Her enthusiasm and attention to detail make her an incredible asset to the CicLAvia team. She's an LA native who loves to explore the city, in addition to cooking, baking, reading, and biking.


4D-1: Room 327. The Green Loop: A 21st Century Public Works Project (Portland)

Hear a moderated panel discussion about how the Green Loop concept emerged from a multi-year public outreach plan in the Central City.  Today, the concept continues to build momentum and has spurred broad coalition-building and equity-based research to understand barriers for active transportation among low-income communities and people of color.  The Loop has inspired a movement that embraces both temporary events and permanent infrastructure. Representatives from BPS, Better Block PDX and ZGF Architects will speak to how the Green Loop has been incorporated into their respective projects.

Lora Lillard

Lora Lillard is an urban designer with the City of Portland’s Bureau of Planning and Sustainability.  She joined BPS’s Urban Design Studio in 2005, where she works with communities to explore design issues and opportunities that create better places for people. Lillard develops strategies to activate public spaces and motivate active transportation. Lillard was one of 50 young urban professionals from around country selected by Next City to be a Vanguard representative at its annual conference.

Nolan Lienhart

Nolan Lienhart is the Director of Planning & Urban Design at ZGF Architects LLP in Portland, Oregon. Nolan has led on a wide range of master planning and strategic development projects which have demanded innovative and tailored solutions to complex financial, political and environmental conditions. Civic leadership is an important part of Nolan's work, which has led to recognition as one of the Portland Business Journal's 2014 Forty Under 40.

4D-1: Room 327. #BetterFeedback through Temporarily Re-Imagined Public Spaces (Portland)

Better Block PDX has been transforming Portland's streets- block by block- since 2013. With a group of dedicated volunteers, Better Block bridges the gap between grassroots advocacy and political power, giving ordinary people a say in how their streets and public spaces can look. In the three years since its existence, Better Block PDX has been responsible for some of the most sophisticated, complex, and robust temporary street re-design projects in America. And in its course, Better Block PDX has found many supporters and raised over $25,000 for livable streets projects in Portland.

Gwen Shaw

Gwen has been involved with Better Block PDX since the first Better Naito project in summer 2015 when she led the PSU Engineering Capstone Team through the project. Since graduating with her Civil Engineering degree, she has continued to work with Better Block PDX to make her hometown of Portland, OR a better place for people. She has helped institutionalize Better Block PDX with PSU and has developed a sustainable program for students, City staff, and community members to work together towards this goal. In her non-volunteer time, she is a Transportation Analyst for Lancaster Engineering and Street Lab where she merges her tactical urbanism and public process experiences to provide clients with a comprehensive solution to their transportation issues. 

4D-2: Room 329. Tactical Urbanism by the Establishment: Creating City Quick-Build Programs 

Cities from NYC to Memphis are using paint, posts & planters to invent a new project delivery model in between "capital" and "operations." We'll explore the sausage-making of creating such programs. This session would be adapted from a report I co-authored this month with Jon Orcutt, the former executive director of TransAlt and policy director for the NYC DOT under Sadik-Khan. Titled "Quick Builds for Better Streets: A New Project Delivery Model for U.S. Cities," it drew on the practices of eight cities (Austin, Chicago, Denver, Memphis, New York, Pittsburgh, San Francisco and Seattle) to identify nine basic ingredients for creating a quick-build program within city government.

Amica Bose

Amica Bose is a traffic engineer at the City of Austin Transportation Department. She is a versatile engineer with backgrounds in both public and private sectors and works on a range of transportation policy, design and implementation efforts to find cost-effective and creative solutions to proactively address multi-modal safety, mobility and access needs to the community. She holds a Bachelor’s Degree in Civil Engineering from Jadavpur University, Kolkata, India and a Masters in Transportation Engineering from Purdue University, Indiana.

Julie Flynn

Julie Flynn is a Project Director at Street Plans and leads the firm’s San Francisco office. Julie served as Project Manager leading Street Plans’ work on the Public Space Stewardship Guide in partnership with the SF Planning Department. She is currently leading research and best practices development for the Street Plans’ forthcoming Tactical Urbanism Guide to Materials and Design, funded by the Knight Foundation. Julie leads many of Street Plans’ Tactical Urbanism demonstration projects, working with clients and local stakeholders to transform streets and public spaces using low-cost or borrowed materials. As Deputy Project Manager for the PlanBTV Walk/Bike Project in Burlington, VT, Julie led design and installation of several complex Tactical Urbanism demonstration projects. She is also leading Street Plans’ work developing a new permit process for Burlington that will enable more citizen-led demonstration projects in public rights-of-way in the future.

Mike Lydon

Mike is a Principal of The Street Plans Collaborative.  As an internationally recognized planner, writer, and advocate for livable cities, his work has been featured by NPR, The New York Times, CNN Headline News, Planetizen, Grist, Salon, Next City, Architect Magazine, and Streetsblog, among other publications. Along with Tony Garcia, He is the author of Tactical Urbanism: Short-term Action for Long-term Change. He is also the creator and primary author of the The Open Streets Project.

4D-2: Room 329. Busting Through Success-Driven Complacency (Missoula)

Sunday Streets Missoula is heralded as a successful community event with record breaking attendance year after year. We became a winning event instead of a best practices program. We’re taking a step back and exploring how we can maximize impact and behavior change through targeted tactics that cultivate and engage multi-sectoral support and reach under-served populations. Can parklets, temporary wayfinding, and innovative educational activities like BIKEapalooza! get your successful event back on track as a best practices program for all ages, all abilities, and all interests? Join us!

Lisa Dworak

Lisa Dworak works for Missoula In Motion (MIM) part of the City's Transportation Division. During her time with MIM, Sunday Streets Missoula grew by 40%, was recognized by The National Open Streets Project and hosted the largest community bike ride. Previously, Lisa managed Live Well Omaha’s Open Streets program. Lisa is a founder of Women Bike Missoula, on the Bike Walk MT board and loves to ski, mountain bike and trail run. Life is better on bike; Lisa encourages you to trade 4 wheels for 2.