Events

How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts | Natalia Molina
Tuesday, May 14, 2019 - 5:00pm

MAY 14TH
Smith Memorial Student Union
Ballroom 355

 

Across the course of the twentieth century, the United States government constructed an “immigration regime” that defined the racial categories which continue to influence perceptions in the U.S. about Mexican Americans, race, and ethnicity. In this lecture, Dr. Molina will illustrate how broad themes of race and citizenship are constructed and explore how “racial scripts” are easily applied to different peoples, places and events.

 

Natalia Molina’s work lies at the intersections of race, gender, culture, and citizenship. She is the author of two award-winning books, Fit to be Citizens? Public Health and Race in Los Angeles, 1879–1939 and How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts. Her current book project examines eight decades of place-making, community formation, and gentrification in the historically multi-ethnic Los Angeles community of Echo Park. She is a Professor of American Studies and Ethnicity at University of Southern California.