Dan DeWeese, M.A.

Dan DeWeese, M.A.
Senior Instructor
Cramer 188 | 725-3580 | deweesed@pdx.edu

B.A. 1995 University of Southern California
M.A. 2003 Portland State University

On the PSU faculty since 2003.
Special Interests: Rhetoric & Composition, Fiction Writing, Film Studies

COURSES

ENG 304: Critical Theory of Cinema, ENG 305: Topics in Film, ENG 331: Introduction to Rhetoric and Composition Studies, ENG 413: Teaching & Tutoring Writing, WR 420: Writing: Process and Response
BOOKS

Disorder, stories (Propeller Books, 2012)
You Don't Love This Man, a novel (Harper Perennial, 2011)
ANTHOLOGY APPEARANCES

“You Are Writing What You Are, All the Time: A Conversation With James Salter,” Conversations With James Salter, eds. Jennifer Levasseur and Kevin Rabalais, University Press of Mississippi (forthcoming 2015).

“Prospero’s Pharmacy: Peter Greenaway and the Critics Play Shakespeare’s Mimetic Game.” Almost Shakespeare, eds. James Keller and Leslie Stratyner, McFarland Publishing (2004).

SELECTED RECENT ARTICLES

"Speculative Cinema: A History," Propeller, January 2014.
“Imaginary Metropolis,”
Oregon Humanities, fall/winter 2013.
"Auteur of the Book: Wes Anderson's Cinema of Readers,"
Propeller, December 2013.
"You Are Writing What You Are, All the Time: A Conversation with James Salter,"
Propeller, October 2013.
“Burning Bushes,” Oregon Humanities, spring 2013.

SHORT FICTION

“Ghost Bikes,” The Normal School (October 2014).
“Leviathan,” Tin House (September 2010).
“The Sleeper,” Portland Noir, ed. Kevin Sampsell, Akashic Publishing (2009).
“Acacia Avenue,” Tin House (December 2007).
“Continuity,” Washington Square (winter 2006).
“Peterson Wins Pritzker,” Contrary (winter 2006).
“The Amber Room,” Salt Hill (fall 2005).
“Graphology,” Tin House (summer 2004).
“They Have Something to Tell Us,” Pindeldyboz (summer 2004).
“General Definers,” Ascent (spring 2004).
“The Problem of the House,” New England Review (summer 2002).
“Here is Your Ghost Story,” Northwest Review (fall 2002).
“Bullies,” New England Review (summer 2002).
“Most Likely to Succeed,” Missouri Review (fall 2001).