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Mark Leymon, Criminology and Criminal Justice faculty, testified at an informational hearing at the Oregon Senate Committee on the Judiciary about the impacts of Measure 11 on youth. Between 1995 and 2012, nearly 4,000 Oregon 15-, 16-, and 17-year-olds we
Author: Currently
Posted: March 12, 2018

Mark Leymon, Criminology and Criminal Justice faculty, testified at an informational hearing at the Oregon Senate Committee on the Judiciary about the impacts of Measure 11 on youth. Between 1995 and 2012, nearly 4,000 Oregon 15-, 16-, and 17-year-olds were referred to adult court under Measure 11. According to Pew Charitable Trust, Oregon has the second highest rate of youth transferred to adult court after Florida. Though youth of color and white youth received about the same average sentence, youth of color are significantly more likely to receive a Measure 11 referral. Black youth make-up about 16 percent of all Measure 11 referrals, yet account for only about 2 percent of the total population of Oregon. Across all 21 offenses covered by Measure 11, black youth were 13.6 times more likely than a white youth to be referred.