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Shelby Anderson, Anthropology faculty, has been awarded a $228,400, three-year National Science Foundation grant to study the antiquity of Arctic aquatic adaptations, which are central to modern Iñupiaq and Inuit culture. Aquatic resources are important f
Author: Currently
Posted: May 21, 2018

Shelby Anderson, Anthropology faculty, has been awarded a $228,400, three-year National Science Foundation grant to study the antiquity of Arctic aquatic adaptations, which are central to modern Iñupiaq and Inuit culture. Aquatic resources are important far beyond food and consumption, providing social, spiritual, community connection, and sustenance. When, why, and how this complex human-animal interaction and way of life developed remains one of the most enduring questions in Arctic archaeology. Anderson is approaching this question through the application of new lipid and isotopic analytical methods to archaeological ceramics and sediments dating to the last 4500 years.