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Summer Symposium on Mentoring Research and Other Community Events

In addition to the Summer Institute, we hold special community events, policy forums, and national presentations distilling the mentoring research for mentoring practitioners and policy-makers. Our Oregon Leaders program, supported by the Oregon Community Foundation, hosts special community symposiums throughout the state.

2013 Summer Symposium on Mentoring Research

On July 26, 2013, the PSU Center for Interdisciplinary Mentoring Research presented the Summer Symposium on Mentoring Research, featuring distinguished researchers who gave short, substantive talks highlighting their most important and intriguing findings.As a general theme, the 2013 Symposium will focused on the role of risk and other personal and environmental factors that influence mentoring relationships and their effectiveness. Videos of their presentations will be coming soon!

Sponsors We gratefully acknowledge support from Oregon Community Foundation

Speakers

Thomas Keller, Ph.D., is the Duncan and Cindy Campbell Professor for Children, Youth, and Families with an Emphasis on Mentoring in the School of Social Work at Portland State University. He is also Director of the PSU Center for Interdisciplinary Mentoring Research. Professor Keller studies the development and influence of formal mentoring relationships as well as initiatives to enhance the effectiveness of mentoring programs. Prior to earning his Ph.D., he worked for several years with a Big Brothers Big Sisters affiliate in Seattle as a caseworker, supervisor, and program director.

Timothy Cavell, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology and Director of Clinical Training at the University of Arkansas. His research focuses on mentoring children who are aggressive or bullied and thus at risk for later delinquency, substance abuse, or psychopathology. Professor Cavell’s work has been funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse, the Hogg Foundation, and Big Brothers Big Sisters of Canada. In addition to numerous academic articles and chapters on mentoring, Professor Cavell is the author of Working with Parents of Aggressive Children: A Practitioner’s Guide, published by the American Psychological Association.

Carla Herrera, Ph.D., is an independent consultant who was formerly a Senior Research Fellow with Public/Private Ventures. Dr. Herrera was the Principal Investigator on a major randomized trial of Big Brothers Big Sisters school-based mentoring programs. She also directed the recently completed multi-site study evaluating how match experiences and the effects of mentoring vary by the risk status of participating youth. The study was conducted in collaboration with Washington State Mentors.

Noelle Hurd, Ph.D., is an Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Virginia. Her research focuses on the ways in which natural mentoring relationships promote resilience during adolescent development. She gives particular attention to the role of contextual factors in promoting or deterring the formation of intergenerational relationships and shaping the nature of interactions between marginalized youth and the adults in their communities.

Michael Karcher, Ph.D., Ed.D., is a Professor in the College of Education and Human Development at University of Texas at San Antonio. Professor Karcher is an expert on cross-age peer mentoring in schools. Currently he is co-Principal Investigator of an OJJDP study to better understand the role of advocacy in effectively mentoring delinquent youth. Previously, he conducted one of the first large-scale school-based mentoring studies, the Study of Mentoring in the Learning Environment (SMILE) funded by the William T. Grant Foundation. Professor Karcher is the author of numerous articles on mentoring in school settings, and he is co-editor of the landmark Handbook of Youth Mentoring.

Sarah Schwartz, Ph.D., has a degree in Clinical Psychology from the University of Massachusetts-Boston. Her research focuses on school- and community-based prevention programs for vulnerable youth. Her publications include studies investigating factors that influence the impact of school-based mentoring, including students' prior relationship histories, the duration of mentoring relationships and re-matching, and the timing of match meetings.

Lindsey Weiler, Ph.D., recently completed her degree in Applied Developmental Science at Colorado State University and is entering an NIH-funded post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Colorado. Her research has examined the Campus Corps therapeutic mentoring program, which she helped to establish and manage. In the Campus Corps program, undergraduates serve as mentors for youth vulnerable to school dropout, substance use/misuse, and delinquent behavior.

 


Southern Oregon Symposium on Youth Mentoring

WHEN: Friday, April 12, 2013, 10:00 - 2:00

WHERE: Medford School District Education Center (Central High School) Board Room, 815 S. Oakdale Ave. Medford, Oregon. The District Boardroom entrance is located off of the parking lot on Monroe Street (north) side of the building

The Southern Oregon Symposium on Youth Mentoring for for youth service providers and policy-makers to discuss the latest developments in youth mentoring theory and research and how they are translated into program practice was held April 12 in Medford. The event gave Oregon's youth service providers access to information from the Portland State University Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring, an annual gathering of nationally recognized researchers and practitioners. The symposium reviewed highlights from past Institutes, focusing on key mentoring issues such as innovative mentoring program models; providing mentoring to youth involved with the juvenile justice, foster care or mental health systems; diversity; mentoring relationships; and best program practices. 

Presenters:

Thomas Keller 
PSU Center for Interdisciplinary Mentoring Research

Meghan Ferns 
Oregon Mentors

Debbie Vought*
Citizens for Safe Schools, Klamath Falls

Matt Sweeney* 
Rogue Valley Youth for Christ Juvenile Justice Mentoring

* Participant of the Oregon Leaders' Summer Institute Program, sponsored by Oregon Community Foundation   

We would like to thank Daniel Murphy, Jackson County Commission on Children and Families. This event is supported by the Oregon Community Foundation

Questions? Contact Kay Logan at (503) 725-9680  kay.logan@pdx.edu

 


 

Summer Symposium on Mentoring Research

Friday, July 27, 2012

This special one-day symposium is for a national audience interested in youth mentoring. Throughout the day, distinguished researchers will give short, substantive talks highlighting their most important and intriguing findings. It will be a fast-paced, stimulating presentation of thought-provoking topics and trends in youth mentoring.  

Theme: The use of formal mentoring to support youth has continued to change and evolve in recent decades, and the 2012 Summer Institute will focus on the theme of innovative and non-traditional models of youth mentoring. The Symposium will feature prominent researchers who investigate effective approaches for serving young people. 

Attendance: The Summer Symposium is intended for everyone with an interest in youth mentoring!

Credits: You may receive four C.E.U.s (continuing education credits) from the PSU School of Social Work.

Schedule:  Friday, July 27, 2012: Check-in (8:30-9:00am), Program (9:00-3:00pm), Reception (3:00-4:30pm)  

Location: Lincoln Performance Hall at Portland State University  

Speaker Bios

Thomas Keller (Institute Director), Ph.D., is the Duncan and Cindy Campbell Professor for Children, Youth, and Families with an Emphasis on Mentoring in the School of Social Work at Portland State University. He is also Director of the PSU Center for Interdisciplinary Mentoring Research. Professor Keller studies the development and influence of mentoring relationships in school and community settings and the role of parent involvement in mentoring interventions. Prior to earning his Ph.D., he worked for several years with a Big Brothers Big Sisters affiliate in Seattle as a caseworker, supervisor, and program director.

Sandra Christenson, Ph.D., is Professor of Educational Psychology at the University of Minnesota. Professor Christenson and her colleagues developed the Check & Connect program, in which mentors systematically monitor performance indicators for students at risk of disengaging from school and provide individualized support in problem solving, skill building, and fostering positive family-school relationships. Check & Connect has been extensively evaluated, with over 15 years of research and a designation as an evidence-based intervention for school retention by the U.S. Department of Education.

Mark Eddy, Ph.D., is Director of Research for Partners for Our Children in the School of Social Work at the University of Washington. Previously, Dr. Eddy was a Senior Scientist with the Oregon Social Learning Center, where he conducted numerous studies of interventions for parents and children. Dr. Eddy is the Principal Investigator of an NIH-funded randomized trial of the Friends of the Children program, which provides paid professional mentors for youth at risk for problems from kindergarten through high school.

Gabriel Kuperminc, Ph.D., is Professor and Chair of Community Psychology at Georgia State University. Professor Professor Kuperminc studies the processes of resilience and positive youth development, and he has expertise on group mentoring as well as the role of mentoring within multi-component programs. Since 1999, he has evaluated the effectiveness of Cool Girls, Inc., a comprehensive youth development program that provides mentoring, tutoring, and life skills training to high risk, urban, preadolescent and early adolescent girls.

Davielle Lakind is a doctoral student in Clinical Psychology at the University of Illinois-Chicago working with the Research Group on Mental Health Services for Urban Children and Families in the Institute for Juvenile Research. Previously she worked as a professional mentor with Friends of the Children in New York City, and she has conducted research on the nature of the role of professional mentors. 

Laurie Powers, Ph.D, is Associate Dean for Research in the School of Social Work and Director of the Regional Research Institute for Human Services at Portland State University. Professor Powers conducts research on programs designed to enhance the self-determination of youth in foster care and youth with disabilities, including federally-funded randomized trials of the My Life intervention. In the My Life program, youth have individual relationships with adult coaches and peer mentors (former foster youth) who support the development of self-determination.

George Noblit, Ph.D., is Joseph R. Neikirk Distinguished Professor of Sociology of Education in the School of Education at University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. Professor Noblit has studied A+arts-enhanced schools, charter schools, and prison education for young offenders. He currently is investigating how the Blue Ribbon Mentor-Advocate program builds the social networks of students and enhances their social mobility through mentoring, advocacy, enrichment, and leadership training.

Sarah Schwartz is a doctoral candidate in Clinical Psychology at University of Massachusetts-Boston. She has published studies investigating factors that influence the impact of school-based mentoring, including the relationship histories of students and the duration of mentoring relationships. She is completing her dissertation on the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program, in which youth select an adult they know to serve as a mentor during and after participation in a residential training program.

 


Cropping the Big Picture - Determining What the New Meta-Analysis Means for Your Mentoring Program

January 19, 2011

Mike Garringer of the National Mentoring Center moderated a discussion with David DuBois, and Summer Institute director Thomas Keller, about Dr. Dubois' new meta-analysis, which combines the results of over 70 mentoring program evaluations into one compelling picture of the overall impact of mentoring programs nationwide. This webinar is the first in a collaboration between the National Mentoring CenterFriends for YouthOregon Mentors, and the Mentoring Partnership of Minnesota

>>Link to video

 


National Mentoring Summit

January 24-25, 2012

We are pleased to be a partner of the 2012 National Mentoring Summit which will be held in Washington D.C., January 24th and 25th. MENTOR, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America, the Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS), the Harvard School of Public Health, the U.S. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention and United Way Worldwide will once again bring together major youth mentoring organizations, along with government, civic, research and corporate leaders, to evaluate best practices, review new research, chart the field’s future and fundamentally ensure that more youth receive quality mentoring. The theme for the 2012 National Mentoring Summit is Invest in the Future: Mentor a Child, which captures the long-term benefits for young people, their mentors and their communities that an investment in quality mentoring can offer.

Make sure to attend the "What Research Says" presentation moderated by Jean Rhodes (Summer Institute Research Fellow in 2010) and featuring Summer Institute Director Thomas Keller and other researchers that have been a part of the Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring:

  • Dr. Jean Rhodes, University of Massachusetts Boston (Moderator)
  • Tim Cavell, Professor and Director of Clinical Training Department of Psychology, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville
  • Keoki Hansen, Director of Research and Evaluation, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America
  • Michael Karcher, Professor of Education and Human Development at the University of Texas at San Antonio
  • Tom Keller, Duncan and Cindy Campbell Professor for Children, Youth, and Families, Portland State University
  • Renee Spencer, Associate Professor, Boston University School of Social Work
  • Marc Wheeler, Associate Director, Program Implementation & Evaluation, Big Brothers Big Sisters of America

 


 


Lane County Symposium on Youth Mentoring

Tuesday, December 13, 2011

On November 13th, 2011 we held the Lane County Symposium on Youth Mentoring for youth service practitioners and policy-makers to discuss the latest developments in youth mentoring theory and research and how they are translated into program practice. This event gave Oregon's youth service providers access to information from the Portland State University Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring -- an annual gathering of nationally recognized researchers and practitioners.The symposium reviewed highlights from past Institutes, focusing on key mentoring issues mentoring youth in the juvenile justice and child-welfare systems, diversity, mentoring relationships and best program practices. Presenters included:

Thomas Keller, Portland State University

Celeste Janssen, Oregon Mentors

Michael Garringer, National Mentoring Center at Education Northwest

Leah Mangis*, Marion County New Solutions, Salem

Jenny Stern-Carusone*, The Center for the Advancement of Mentoring, EDC

*Participant of the Oregon Leaders' Summer Institute Program, sponsored by Oregon Community Foundation

This symposium was supported by the Oregon Community Foundation.

 


 

Research-Policy-Practice Dialogue: Improving Outcomes for System-Involved Youth

Monday, July 25, 2011

This special, by-invitation forum for researchers, policy makers, agency leaders, funders, and representatives from state mentoring partnerships was designed to address the issues of mentoring system-involved youth and the implications of the latest research for practice, funding, policy, and collaborative planning. Panelists and presenters included Tom Keller, PSU; Kevin George, Director, Foster Care, DHS (OR); Margie Hunt, Casey Family Programs; Jeff Anderson, Oregon Community Foundation; Lisa Pellegrino, Portland Children’s Levy; Keith James, Juvenile Rehabilitation Agency, (WA); Jeffrey Butts, John Jay College; Tim Cavell, U. of Arkansas; Michelle Munson, New York University; Julia Pryce, Loyola University-Chicago; Laura Parker, CADY Mentoring Program; and Olivia Eudaly, Texas State Amachi Program. This event was in partnership with Oregon Mentors and MENTOR/National Mentoring Partnership.

 


 


Summer Symposium on Mentoring Research: Mentoring in the Juvenile Justice and Foster Care Systems

Friday, July 22, 2011

Portland State University presented the Summer Symposium on Mentoring Research, a special one-day symposium is for a national audience of professionals from mentoring programs as well as those who work in the fields of child welfare, juvenile justice, mental health, and education. The focus of the 2011 Summer Symposium on Mentoring Research will be the mentoring of youth involved with child welfare or juvenile justice systems. The Symposium featured prominent researchers who investigate effective approaches for serving these youth. Speakers included:

Kym Ahrens University of Washington

Jeffrey Butts John Jay College of Criminal Justice, CUNY 

Tim Cavell University of Arkansas

Roger Jarjoura Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis

Thomas Keller Portland State University

Leslie Leve Oregon Social Learning Center

Michelle Munson New York University

Laurie Powers Portland State University

Julia Pryce Loyola University Chicago

Renee Spencer Boston University

Heather Taussig University of Colorado

& The Foster Club All Stars

 

This symposium was supported by the Oregon Community Foundation and the Portland Children's Levy.

>>View Videos of Presentations

 


 

Mid-Willamette Symposium on Youth Mentoring 

November 8th, 2010, 9:30am - 2:30pm

On November 8th, 2010 we held the Mid-Willamette Symposium on Youth Mentoring for youth service practitioners and policy-makers to discuss the latest developments in youth mentoring theory and research and how they are translated into program practice. This event gave Oregon's youth service providers access to information from the Portland State University Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring -- an annual gathering of nationally recognized researchers and practitioners.The symposium reviewed highlights from past Institutes, focusing on key mentoring issues such as the use of technology, diversity, mentoring relationships and best program practices. Presenters included:

Dr. Thomas Keller, PSU's Center for Interdisciplinary Mentoring Research

Celeste Janssen, Oregon Mentors

Michael Garringer, National Mentoring Center at Education Northwest

Sarah Spinks*, Mid Valley Mentors, Salem

Kim Filla*, Portland OIC/Rosemary Anderson High School, Portland

*Participant of the Oregon Leaders' Summer Institute Program, sponsored by Oregon Community Foundation

This symposium was supported by the Oregon Community Foundation.

 


 

Social Policy Report on School-based Mentoring: National Press Club Event

Sept. 9, 2010

CIMR faculty members Keller and Wheeler, along with mentoring researcher David Dubois of the University of Illinois at Chicago, discussed their work on school-based mentoring at the National Press Club in Washington DC, September 9th.

>> Download Social Policy Report Brief

 


 

Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring Kick-Off Event

July 26, 2010, 5:00 - 6:30

We kicked-off the Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring with a panel discussion of mentoring experts. This year's panel included:

Thomas Keller, Portland State University

Jean Rhodes, University of Massachusetts--Boston

Michael Karcher, University of Texas--San Antonio

Susan Murphy, James Madison University

Kevin O’Neill, Simon Fraser University, Canada

Carmit-Noa Shpigelman, Western Galilee College, Israel

Peg Boyle Single, Independent Research & Consultation

 

This community event was supported by the Oregon Community Foundation.

 


 

Summer Institute on Youth Mentoring Community Symposium

August 2, 2010, 9:00 - 2:00

The Community Symposium was an opportunity for mentoring and youth development program staff and volunteers to hear about the highlights of the mentoring research shared at the institute, and discuss implications for policy and practice.

Speakers included:

Thomas Keller, Portland State University

Gary Kosman, America Learns

Michael Garringer, National Mentoring Center

Celeste Janssen, Oregon Mentors

Sarah Spinks*, Mid Valley Mentors

Joe Walsh*, Washington Cty Juvenile Dept., Sky’s the Limit Program

*Participant of the Oregon Leaders' Summer Institute Program, sponsored by Oregon Community Foundation

This symposium was supported by the Oregon Community Foundation.

 


 

Demystifying Dissertation Writing

July 29, 2010, 5:00 - 6:30

This workshop was presented by Peg Boyle Single, Ph.D., author of Demystifying Dissertation Writing:A Streamlined Process from Choice of Topic to Final Text and columnist for the on-line newspaper Inside Higher Education. Dr. Single has worked with faculty members and doctoral students for over 15 years. During this time, she has developed a system that demystifies dissertation writing and advising and that helps doctoral students and faculty members increase their writing fluency, productivity, and enjoyment. To learn about Dr. Single and her work, you can visit her website at www.pegboylesingle.com.

 


 

Southern Oregon Symposium on Youth Mentoring

May 3, 2010, 9:30 - 2:00

This event was held at the Running Y Ranch in Klamath Falls and was designed for youth mentoring researchers & practitioners to discuss the latest developments in youth mentoring theory and research and how they are translated into program practice.

Featured speakers included:

Thomas Keller, Portland State University

Debbie Vought*, Citizens for Safe Schools

Bob Moore*, COPY Program, Deschutes County Sheriff's Office

Jenny Stern-Carusone*, Committed Partners for Youth, BBBS of Lane County

& Oregon Mentors

*Participant of the Oregon Leaders' Summer Institute Program, sponsored by Oregon Community Foundation

This symposium was supported by the Oregon Community Foundation.