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Using Web 2.0 as a Community Policing Strategy: An Examination of the United States Municipal Police Departments
Using Web 2.0 as a Community Policing Strategy: An Examination of the United States Municipal Police Departments

Authors

Matthew A. Jones (Portland State University, USA), Melchor C. de Guzman (SUNY Brockport, USA) and Korni Swaroop Kumar (SUNY Brockport, USA)

Publication

Public Service, Governance and Web 2.0 Technologies: Future Trends in Social Media, Chapter 9. IGI Global, 2012.

Topics Covered

  • Citizen Mobilization
  • Citizen Participation
  • E-Governance
  • Public Administration and Social Media
  • Public Management
  • Public Service and Social Media
  • Social Media
  • Social Problem-Solving
  • Web 2.0 and Social Interaction
  • Web 2.0 Technologies and Public Service

 

Abstract

Community policing is intended to empower citizens who are plagued by crime and disorder. Scholars have considered community policing as a proactive measure that addresses issues of disorder to prevent the occurrence of more serious crimes (Goldstein, 1986; Wilson & Kelling, 1982). In a digital age, people are increasingly interacting socially via web platforms. This digital interaction includes governments, which can interact with the citizens in their society to co-produce effective responses to criminal activity. Social media applications such as Facebook, Twitter, blogs, iPhone applications, and Nixle provide new media for citizens and police interactions. Using a sample of 163 municipal police departments, this chapter examines the level and type of participation among municipal police departments using these resources. It is argued that Web 2.0 social media applications allow for a more fluent and dialogic relationship between citizens and police to work together to reduce crime and increase community livability. Policy and practice recommendations related to participating in and enhancing social media presence for police are also provided.

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