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Seminar Archive 2012

 

FALL 2012 SCHEDULE

 

 

DATE: Friday, October 5th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTERS: John Balwit
TITLE: The Complexity Explorer Project
 
SUMMARY: The Complexity Explorer project is a web-site-development effort of the Santa Fe Institute, in collaboration with Portland State University. The project is funded by the John Templeton Foundation, through a grant to the Santa Fe Institute. The website is designed to be used my researchers, non-experts, instructors and others interested in exploring concepts in Complexity Science. John Balwit will offer a “sneak preview” of some of the teaching models in the Complexity Explorer (Logistic Map, Computation, and Fractals) and lead a discussion on the constellation of ideas that represent Complexity Science.
 
BIO: John Balwit is a PhD student in the PSU Systems Science Graduate Program.
 
Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:

 


DATE: Friday, October 12th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Alex Nielsen
TITLE: System Dynamics Modeling of Prescription Opioid Pain Reliever Abuse
 
SUMMARY: The nonmedical use of prescription opioid pain relievers and associated overdose deaths have been labeled an epidemic by the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention.  While these medicines play an important role in the treatment of pain, the benefits of opioids for the treatment of pain need to be balanced against these very real risks.  Alex has been working closely with Professor Wayne Wakeland, Teresa Schmidt, and Dr. Dennis McCarty (OHSU) to create a dynamic systems-level model of opioid use, abuse, and diversion in order to give context to current research in this area and to provide a better understanding of possible effects of interventions to deter nonmedical use and minimize harms.

Alex will present the "initiation" sector of a multi-sector model of the prescription opioid abuse system.  In this model, initiation of opioid use is modeled as an infectious process in which current users infect their friends with the idea of opioid use.  In the absence of other factors, this classic SIR (Susceptible-Infected-Recovered) infection model results in exponential growth in the user population.  In the model this growth is mitigated by opioid supply factors and deterred by negative messaging by heavy users.  The model is very much a work in progress, so comments, challenges, and questions are expected and welcome.

BIO: Alex Nielsen is a doctoral student in the Systems Science Graduate Program.  Her current research focuses on system dynamic simulation and microsimulation of prescription opioid use, misuse and abuse.

 

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:

 


 

DATE: Friday, October 19th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTERS: Dr. Peter Veerman
TITLE: Speciation as an Evolutionary Strategy

SUMMARY: We consider a class of models that generalizes the Bak Sneppen model that can be used to study evolution. Agents with random fitnesses are located at the vertices of a graph G. At every time-step the agent with the worst fitness and its neighbors on G are replaced by new agents with random fitnesses. By using Order Statistics and Dynamical Systems, we succeeded in solving a number of questions about how the distribution of the fitnesses evolves under this process. In particular we can prove that for the models that describe in-species evolution, all initial conditions converge to a (not necessarily unique) discrete measure. In contrast for models that describe speciation, every initial probability measure will converge to a (unique) absolutely continuous measure. The conclusion is that in-species evolution can optimize fitness but all agents tend to become identical (no diversity). Speciation on the other hand also improves fitness a little less dramatically, but diversity is retained: a range of fitnesses is preserved.
 
Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.D99F0639F5A2D9B...

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DATE: Friday, October 26th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM

LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Thaddeus Shannon 
TITLE: Color and the Case for Linguistic Data Abstraction: A Fuzzy Framework
 
SUMMARY: We will explore the case of human color perception as an example of a compression process from an infinite dimensional manifold into a low dimensional and potentially finite color space. The efficacy of current color processing technology will be discussed and placed in a fuzzy systems framework. The resulting data abstraction model will then be compared to current approaches to dimension reduction and data compression common in the social and engineering sciences.

BIO: Tad Shannon has been a theatrical lighting designer for over twenty years. He is currently an assistant professor in the Theatre-Dance Department at Western Oregon University and holds a Ph.D. in Systems Science from Portland State University.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:

 


 


DATE: Friday, November 2nd, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
TITLE: An Ecology Of Ideas Session: How do Gregory Bateson's Ideas Resonate in Today's World?
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104

SUMMARY The art of thinking in terms of systems is a practice that requires all faculties of cognitive process. Linear thinking, is a default habit that has been hardwired into our perception for generations that takes significant concentration to get beyond. 

All too often our “solutions” cause more problems. There are consequences to intervening in complex systems that we are not in the habit of looking for. And, unfortunately, as we can see in the current global list of crisis, consequences to the consequences. In order to address the issues we face with a perspective that can effectively hold the complex interrelationships of the natural world we need to expand the context. 

In our current search for “solutions”, to ecological, economic, social, educational, agricultural, political problems it has become increasingly clear that a new kind of thinking is necessary. Einstein said, “ No problem can be solved at the same level of consciousness that created it”. to get to another level of thinking, different questions have to be asked, from a different perspective. When Gregory Bateson asked the question, “What is the pattern that connects the crab to the lobster the orchid to the primrose and the four of them to me, and me to you?”-He pushed our perception to the level of patterning of the interrelationships. How can we begin to apply this form engagement toward cultivating a more suitable set of questions, a more productive debate, and a richer conversation? How is the ecology related to social infrastructure, education related to economy, politics related to agriculture.. and how are all of these contributing to our limited ability to respond effectively to those in need?

BIO: Nora Bateson:  Writer, director and producer of the award-winning documentary "An Ecology of Mind, a portrait of my father, Gregory Bateson’s, way of thinking".

Link for remote participation:  https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.96BDAFD6234FE3353B1F1C30F55D44

Free movie on Nov. 1

 

Thanks to MercyCorps and the PNCA Collaborative Design Program, Nora will join us at the Portland film premier. The film is being shown in conjunction with the “Design with the Other 90%: Cities” exhibition and there will be a post- ‐film discussion on “Cybernetic Cities: An Ecology of the Urban Mind.”

 

Thursday – November 1, 2012 – 7pm

MercyCorps Aceh Community Room

28 SW First Ave

FREE

Film trailer here: http://www.anecologyofmind.com/

BIO: Nora Bateson:  Writer, director and producer of the award-winning documentary "An Ecology of Mind, a portrait of my father, Gregory Bateson’s, way of thinking".

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DATE: Friday, November  9th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM

PRESENTOR: Felix Gurley-Rimberg

 LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104

TITLE: "Marvin Minsky:  Learnings from Artificial Intelligence" 

SUMMARY: Minsky, Emeritus Professor at MIT, with three others, convened a two-month summer study on Artificial Intelligence in 1956, thereby helping to create a new field of inquiry.

Among many interesting learnings from this field, three might be usefully discussed today:

1)  WATSON's win in Jeopardy on January 13th, 2011.
2)  Minsky's suggestion that "common sense" still resists all efforts at artificial replication, as does the construction of bird nests
3)  Emotions are (also) a powerful assist to intelligence, not a counterpoise, as they help to explore or create new styles and facets of problem solving.

BIO: felix gurley-rimberg, a student of poetry at PSU, is working to explore alternative futures with the SysSci team at Harder House. He's helping in a search to enlarge prospects for students, faculty, alumni and friends as Sys Sci moves into the School of Environment. Felix has worked in organizational development and helped leaders to launch, or crews to lifeboats, in a dozen groups. Most recently he helped his partner of 47 years to found two new charter high schools in Pennsylvania: one for 11th and 12th graders, in Reading, Pennsylvania; one of the poorest cities in America with a 75% latino teen population, where all 350 enrolled students were drop-outs at the time of application. The other, Friere High School in Philadelphia is in it's 14th year with a 99% black student body and 97% college admission rate. Other start-ups include: the Morasha Academy for adult Jewish learners in Portland, now in its 10th year; Oregon Future, a magazine currrently limping along somewhere on the campus of Willamette University in its 15th year; the Institute of Ecology, with NSF and the Ecological Society of America (born 1970, died 1988); the O&O Investment Fund (1982-85); Pizzazz (a worker-owned pizzaria (1985-1988); the Miami Valley Regional Planning Commission, now in its 53rd year.

For remote participation:

https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.893F67EA90DA39ECF3D3B29C4AFFD8

 

 

 

DATE: November 16th, 2012, 12:00-1:00 pm

PRESENTER:  Joshua Hughes

LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104

TITLE:  "How does it get smart? Computational Intelligence for the Smart Grid"

ABSTRACT:  We have been hearing about the "Smart Grid" for

approximately a decade now.  We have heard about smart meters and

smart appliances and increasing our use of renewable resources,

generally understanding that "smart" means information will be

collected from throughout the electrical grid so that electrical power

can be used more efficiently, economically, and sustainably. Yet

rarely do we hear how exactly a "Smart Grid" is to be implemented or

how difficult this task is.

 

In this talk I will discuss my work on applying computational

intelligence methods for prediction and control of energy resources

for a specific control area as part of a small team developing

Portland General Electric's Salem Smart Power Platform (SSPP), PGE's

DOE-funded Smart Grid Demonstration Project.  I'll briefly discuss the

project and the general architecture of the system being developed by

our team and then shift focus for the remainder of the talk to my use

of computational intelligence methods for developing a load forecaster

and resource dispatcher.  I will present real-world data and results

and discuss the difficulties of acquiring, handling, and analyzing

real-world data.  I will also provide brief explanations of the

specific system science methods used in my work including neural

networks, reconstructability analysis, and data mining.

 

BIO: Joshua Hughes is a core-option Ph.D. student in the PSU Systems

Science Graduate Program, where he has been a teaching assistant,

research assistant, and instructor.  He received his B.S. in Civil

Engineering from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in 1993, his M.S. in

Civil Engineering from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1995,

and his M.S. in Systems Science from Portland State University in 2012

. Joshua has more than a dozen years experience working as an

engineering consultant in Portland-Vancouver and the San Francisco Bay

Area.  He enrolled in the System Science Program five years ago to

learn general methods and tools applicable to a wider variety of

complex problems.  For the last year he has been working as a

consultant for Portland General Electric, providing computational

intelligence services for its DOE-funded Smart Grid Demonstration

Project.  His dissertation subject is the higher-level application of

neural network-based adaptive-critic dynamic programming for system

control.  He also works on computer modeling and simulation projects,

data mining, and prediction models.

 

 

Remote Participation Linkhttps://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.8D8416130AFE135A58DC599D89398E

 

 

 

DATE: Friday, November 30th, 2012, 12:00 - 1:00 PM

LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104

PRESENTER: Tim Smith

 

TITLE: Civic Ecology: Living Community Systems for Sustainability

 

SUMMARY: 

Civic Ecology is a stakeholder-driven, whole systems framework for creating sustainable communities. The framework focuses on empowering citizens of all ages, cultures, and abilities to envision, create, and manage their community’s unique “software” -- the integrated energy, nutrient, water, waste, material, and food systems, as well as economic flows and cultural interactions that animate their place. Exploring and supporting these flows allows communities to enhance their local wealth (environmental, economic, and social), resilience, and competitiveness, and help them take control of designing and managing their future through collaboration and innovation. The Civic Ecology framework can be the foundation upon which investments in community “hardware” (i.e. storm water facilities, green streets, district energy facilities and EcoDistricts) can be realized.

 

This presentation will provide attendees with a working understanding of the Civic Ecology framework by describing principles, benefits, the five-step CIVIC process, and examples of Civic Ecology applications in a variety of communities.

 

Bio: Tim Smith  is a certified planner and a registered architect with thirty years of professional experience. Tim received a Master of Architecture in Urban Design and a Masters in City Planning from the University of Pennsylvania. Tim taught urban design and town planning at the University of Pennsylvania in the Graduate School of Fine Arts. He has directed planning and design studies for transit-oriented development, new towns and villages, the revitalization of existing villages, corridor planning projects, land use studies, town center planning and design projects, and community involvement initiatives.

 

For remote participation: https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.621DE1BD877A51F781F86D5D53431C

 

 


 

 





WINTER 2012 SCHEDULE


  • 03/16/12 - Angela Strecker, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science and Management, PSU, "Environmental stressors in Freshwater Ecosystems: Consequences for Communities and Conservation" [Announcement] [Elluminate Recording]
  • 03/09/12 - Jeffrey Fletcher, Professor of Systems Science, PSU, "Tsunamis to Genocides: Exploring the Human Response to Catastrophe" [Announcement] [Elluminate Recording]
  • 03/02/12 - Melanie Mitchell, Professor of Computer Science, PSU, "Using Analogy to Discover the Meaning of Images" [Announcement] [Elluminate Recording]
  • 02/24/12 - Robert Scheller, Assistant Professor of Environmental Science, PSU, "Disturbance Regimes, Competing Objectives, and the Limits to Science: Using Stochastic Simulation to Support Management Decisions" [Announcement] [Elluminate Recording]
  • 02/17/12 - Rajesh Venkatachalapathy, Systems Science Phd student, PSU, "Dialects, Pidgins, Creoles and all that" [Announcement] [Elluminate Recording]
  • 02/10/12 - Dario Nardi, Professor of Anthropology and founder of the Human Complex Systems Degree Program at UCLA, "Neuroscience of Personality: A Systems Approach" [Announcement] neuro-systems.pdf[Elluminate Recording]
  • 02/03/12 - Richard B. Norgaard, Professor of Energy and Resources, University of California-Berkeley, "Ecosystem Services: From eye-opening metaphor to complexity blinder" [Announcement] Norgaard.ppt [Elluminate Recording]
  • 01/27/12 - Martin Zwick, Professor of Systems Science, PSU, "Complexity Thory and Political Change: Talcott Parsons Occupies Wall Street." [Announcement] [Abstract] [pdf] [Elluminate Recording]
  • 01/20/12 - Brian Kasper, Senior Remote Sensing Scientist, WSI, "Using Airborne LiDAR for Environmental Analysis and Modeling" [Announcement] [Elluminate Recording]
  • 01/13/12 - Rich Jolly, Recent PhD Graduate, PSU, "The Role of Feedback in the Assimilation of Information in Prediction Markets" [Announcement]
  • 03/18/12 - Classes end

 


DATE: Friday, March 16th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Angela Strecker

TITLE: Environmental Stressors in Freshwater Ecoystems: Consequences for Communities and Conservation

SUMMARY: Freshwater ecosystems provide critical functions and services, but are increasingly threatened by a multitude of anthropogenic stressors. These stressors may affect ecological communities at both local and regional scales, and alter fundamental physical, biological and chemical properties of the system. Our current understanding of the effects of these stressors on ecological communities is limited, particularly when considering interactive effects of multiple stressors, hampering our ability to predict responses to future environmental change. I will discuss aspects of my research program (e.g., invasive species and climate change) that seek to inform community dynamics in the context of conservation of freshwater organisms and ecosystems.

BIO: Undergraduate degree (BSc Honours) from the University of Regina (in Saskatchewan, Canada). PhD from Queen's University (Ontario, Canada) studying an invasive invertebrate planktivore. Post doc at the University of Toronto studying Lake Huron fish communities. Post doc at University of Washington working on conservation of fish communities in the southwest. Started as faculty in Environmental Science & Management at PSU in September 2011.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:

 

 

 


 

DATE: Friday, March 9th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Jeff Fletcher

TITLE: Tsunamis to Genocides: Exploring the Human Response to Catastrophe

SUMMARY: The varied response to human suffering in different contexts can give us some insight into the mechanisms that invoke both empathy and action towards others. Recent efforts to understand these differences have focused on how stimuli can differentially affect our emotional vs. analytic capacities, the concept of psychic numbing, and our poor grasp of large numbers. In this talk I argue that understanding our judgments about who is in our own groups (in-group) and who is not (out-group), may also help us better understand different responses to different types of crises. These in-group/out-group distinctions are overlapping and surprisingly flexible in scale, in time, and in intensity. More awareness of this framework may allow for more efficacy in appeals for empathy and aid to those in need.

BIO: Jeff Fletcher's research focuses on understanding the relationship among different theories of the evolution of altruism. He is also interested in the role human cooperation plays in addressing societal challenges such as sustainability (including environmental, social, and economic) and how understanding social dilemmas can help facilitate cooperation. His involvement in the debate over how altruism evolves has led him to an interest in better understanding (and making more explicit) the role that models play in scientific inquiry. As a teacher he is also interested in how best to bring systems ideas to students of all ages. Jeff completed an NSF International Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of British Columbia where he did research in the Department of Zoology and taught in the Integrated Science Program. He currently teaches in both the University Studies Program and the Systems Science Graduate Program at PSU. Jeff has a BS in Biology, an MS in Computer Science, and a Ph.D. in Systems Science.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.0B1FAF27BEDDB60EB3FBBD015DB303

 

 

 

DATE: Friday, March 2nd, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Melanie Mitchell

 

TITLE: Using Analogy to Discover the Meaning of Images

 

SUMMARY: Enabling computers to understand images remains one of the hardest open problems in artificial intelligence. No machine vision system comes close to matching human ability at identifying the contents of images or visual scenes or at recognizing similarity between different scenes, even though such abilities pervade human cognition. In this talk I will describe research---currently in early stages---on bridging the gap between low-level perception and higher-level image understanding by integrating a cognitive model of pattern recognition and analogy-making with a neural model of the visual cortex.

 

BIO: Melanie Mitchell is Professor of Computer Science at Portland State University, and External Professor and Member of the Science Board at the Santa Fe Institute. She attended Brown University, where she majored in mathematics and did research in astronomy, and the University of Michigan, where she received a Ph.D. in computer science, Her dissertation, in collaboration with her advisor Douglas Hofstadter, was the development of Copycat, a computer program that makes analogies. She has held faculty or professional positions at the University of Michigan, the Santa Fe Institute, Los Alamos National Laboratory, the OGI School of Science and Engineering, and Portland State University. She is the author or editor of five books and over 70 scholarly papers in the fields of artificial intelligence, cognitive science, and complex systems. Her most recent book, Complexity: A Guided Tour (Oxford, 2009), won the 2010 Phi Beta Kappa Science Book Award. It was also named by Amazon.com as one of the ten best science books of 2009, and was longlisted for the Royal Society's 2010 book prize.

 

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.F35A611EEC846BE280EE598ED0AFBC

 

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DATE: Friday, February 24th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Rajesh Venkatachalapathy

TITLE: Dialects, Pidgins, Creoles and all that

SUMMARY: Conventional linguistics and linguists implicitly consider languages as stationary objects. On the other hand, abnormal beasts like dialects, pidgins, and creoles are hard nuts to crack within the Chomskian paradigm. In this talk, we illustrate these issues using a single dialect and then zoom-out to give an unifying picture of language change.

BIO: Rajesh Venkatachalapathy is a graduate student at the Systems Science graduate program at Portland State University. He is interested in the general problem of how agents behave in complex environments focused on developing formal models of behavior for agents possessing neural substrate. These models are inspired by formal language structures and are developed within the traditions of Embodied Cognition. His other interests include Inference of Complex Systems, Generalized Information and Communication Measures, Cognitive Linguistics, General Systems Theory, and Systems Philosophy.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.9F99AFB842E4C8E17A56C78B3F8169

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DATE: Friday, February 17th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Robert M. Scheller

TITLE: Disturbance Regimes, Competing Objectives, and the Limits to Science: Using Stochastic Simulation to Support Management Decisions

SUMMARY: Disturbances may have profound effects on the management of carnivore populations, particularly if their habitat needs are specialized or if their habitat is fragmented. Wildfire, insect outbreaks, harvesting, and fuels management can all reduce habitat quality for carnivores and further fragment available habitat. Climate change could potentially exacerbate these effects if the risk of large or severe disturbances increases. We expect science to help optimize management of such populations; however, substantial uncertainties are unavoidable in complex and chaotic systems. I will present a case study from the Sierra Nevada of California, where crown-replacing wildfires threaten fisher (Martes pennanti) habitat over broad areas. Proposals to thin vegetation to reduce wildfire risks have been controversial because fuel treatments would also adversely affect fisher populations but may provide protection from the most severe fires. Simultaneously, climate change may increase the risk of wildfire to fisher habitat. The effects of wildfires and fuels management on fisher habitat and population size were simulated using multiple models. The simulated immediate negative effects of fuel treatments were compared to the simulated longer-term positive effect of fuel treatment. Results indicated that the direct, negative effects of fuel treatments on fisher populations are generally smaller than the indirect, positive effects of fuel treatments, because fuels treatments reduced the probability of large wildfires. Analysis of such trade-offs are increasingly imperative as management seeks to optimize multiple goals (e.g., maintain habitat, reduce fire risk, produce timber) and is simultaneously constrained by the risk of large climate change effects. However, there was large uncertainty in our projections due to stochastic disturbances and population dynamics, demonstrating the difficulty of projecting change in systems characterized by large, infrequent, stochastic disturbances.

BIO: Dr. Scheller is an Assistant Professor of Environmental Sciences and Management at PSU. Prior to joining PSU in 2009, Dr. Scheller was the Senior Ecologist at the Conservation Ecology Institute.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.0D06E27DFC3F2A1C12017CBC403D77

 

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DATE: Friday, February 10th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Dario Nardi

TITLE: Neuroscience of Personality: A Systems Approach

SUMMARY: The brain is a complex living system. Using colorful slides and anecdotes, Dario Nardi, PhD will overview his hands-on research of the past 5 years in his social neuroscience lab using EEG technology to better understand the neocortex. He spends 2 to 3 hours with each subject, offering a variety of tasks from solo activities like meditating, drawing, and recalling to social activities like poker and speed-dating. The results are in. The neocortex relies upon a dynamic of modules, circuits, and holistic modes to continuously coordinate with the environment in both a top-down and a bottom-up manner. Moreover, individual differences matter, and there are key principles such as the "threshold to activation" and "engagement curve" that hint at how systems like the brain come to sustain themselves.

BIO: Dario is a founder of UCLA's Human Complex Systems degree program, winner of UCLA's annual Distinguished Teaching award, and author/coauthor of numerous books including "Neuroscience of Personality". He received his degree from SUNY Binghamton in Systems Science. His undergraduate degree is Aerospace Engineering from USC. Dario is also the founder and CEO of Radiance House media and books.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.F318777EBC9AD79B3A5F299CC10518

 

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DATE: Friday, February 3rd, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Richard B. Norgaard

TITLE: Ecosystem Services: From eye-opening metaphor to complexity blinder

SUMMARY: What started as a humble metaphor to help us think about our relation to nature has become integral to how we are addressing the future of humanity and the course of biological evolution. The metaphor of nature as a stock that provides a flow of services is insufficient for the difficulties we are in or the task ahead. Indeed, combined with the mistaken presumption that we can analyze a global problem within a partial equilibrium economic framework and reach a new economy project-by-project without major institutional change, the simplicity of the stock-flow framework blinds us to the complexity of the human predicament. The ecosystem services approach can be a part of a larger solution, but its dominance in our characterization of our situation and the solution is blinding us to the ecological, economic, and political complexities of the challenges we actually face.

BIO: Richard B. Norgaard is Professor of Energy and Resources. He received his B.A. in economics from the University of California at Berkeley, M.S. in agricultural economics from Oregon State University, and Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago in 1971. Among the founders of the field of ecological economics, his recent research addresses how environmental problems challenge scientific understanding and the policy process, how ecologists and economists understand systems differently, and how globalization affects environmental governance. He has field experience in the Alaska, Brazil, California, and Vietnam with minor forays in other parts of the globe.

Dr. Norgaard is the author of one book, co-author or editor of three additional books, and has over 100 other publications spanning the fields of environment and development, tropical forestry and agriculture, environmental epistemology, energy economics, and ecological economics. Though an eclectic scholar, he is also among the 1000 economists in the world most cited by other economists (Millennium Editions of Who's Who in Economics, 2000) and was one of ten American economists interviewed in The Changing Face of Economics: Conversations with Cutting Edge Economists(Colander, Holt, and Rosser, University of Michigan Press, 2004). He is currently writing on how the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change and the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment facilitate collective understandings of complex systems.

Dr. Norgaard currently chairs the Delta Independent Science Board of the State of California, is a lead author in the 5th assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and serves on the Board of EcoEquity. He has served on numerous committees of the National Academy of Sciences and the former office of Technology Assessment and was a member of the U.S. Scientific Committee on Problems of the Environment. He served as President of the International Society for Ecological Economics (1998-2001). He has been a visiting scholar at the World Bank and served on the Science Advisory Board of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Independent Science Board of the California Bay – Delta Authority. He served on the Board of the American Institute of Biological Sciences (2000-2009).

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.CF3827E1A7D8500A6420C2CA3E9829

 

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DATE: Friday, January 27th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Martin Zwick

TITLE: Complexity Theory and Political Change: Talcott Parsons Occupies Wall Street

SUMMARY: Complexity theory can assist our understanding of social systems and social phenomena. This paper illustrates this assertion by linking Talcott Parsons' model of societal structure to the Occupy Wall Street movement. Parsons' model is used to organize ideas about the underlying causes of the recession that currently afflicts the US. While being too abstract to depict the immediate factors that precipitated this crisis, the model is employed to articulate the argument that vulnerability to this type of event results from flaws in societal structure. This implies that such crises can be avoided only if, in Parsons' terms, structural change occurs in the relations between polity, economy, community, and culture. The Occupy movement has called attention to the need for such fundamental change.

BIO: Martin Zwick has been a core Systems Science faculty member since 1976. His main interests are information theoretic modeling, theoretical biology, and systems theory and philosophy. Scientifically, his focus is on applying systems theory and methodology to the natural and social sciences, especially to biomedical data analysis, the evolution of cooperation, and sustainability. Philosophically, his focus is on how systems ideas relate to classical and contemporary philosophy, how they offer a bridge between science and religion, and how they can help us understand and address societal problems.

 

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:

https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.AFBC3665C864C79D76ED89DA73BD03

 

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DATE: Friday, January 20th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Brian Kasper

TITLE: Using Airborne LiDAR for Environmental Analysis and Modeling

SUMMARY: Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is an optical remote sensing technology that is used to create high resolution 3D maps within a geographic information system (GIS). The LiDAR system is mounted within an aircraft and uses lasers to rapidly scan the earth’s surface. The data is processed to create a 3-dimensional point cloud consisting of billions of points which accurately represent the ground, vegetation, buildings, etc. LiDAR has a broad range of applications including ecosystem analysis, urban planning, forest inventories, power line assessments, volcano monitoring, fault detection, building mapping, flood prediction, stream modeling, wind farm optimization, archeology and more.

BIO: Brian Kasper is a senior remote sensing scientist at WSI in Portland, Oregon. He has a Bachelor’s degree in Biology and Master’s degree in Environmental Science and Engineering. Brian spent 8 years at the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality, where he modeled stream networks and developed water quality restoration plans. He has been with WSI for the past 6 years, where he processes and analyzes LiDAR data and uses it to simulate a variety of natural and human-made landscape features. Brian also participates in research and development to improve existing LiDAR applications and create new analysis methodologies.

 

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.620F425C9B921DCFEBBF843B215443

 

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DATE: Friday, January 13th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM

LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Rich Jolly

TITLE: The Role of Feedback in the Assimilation of Information in Prediction Markets

ABSTRACT: Leveraging the knowledge of an organization is an ongoing challenge that has given rise to the field of knowledge management. Yet, despite spending enormous sums of organizational resources on Information Technology (IT) systems, executives recognize there is much more knowledge to harvest. Prediction markets are emerging as one tool to help extract this tacit knowledge and make it operational. Yet, prediction markets, like other markets, are subject to pathologies (e.g., bubbles and crashes) which compromise their accuracy and may discourage organizational use. The techniques of experimental economics were used to study the characteristics of prediction markets. Empirical data was gathered from an on-line asynchronous prediction market. Participants allocated tickets based on private information and, depending on the market type, public information indicative of how prior participants had allocated their tickets. The experimental design featured three levels of feedback (no-feedback, percentages of total allocated tickets and frequency of total allocated tickets) presented to the participants. The research showed that the presence and type of feedback can be used to modulate market performance. Adding feedback, or more informative feedback, increased the market's precision at the expense of accuracy. The research supported the hypotheses that these changes were due to the inductive aggregation process which creates agreement (increasing precision), but also occasionally generates information mirages (which reduces accuracy).

BIO: Rich Jolly has just completed a PhD from Portland State University in Systems Science: Business Administration. Prior Rich worked in various marketing and design roles in the high technology arena (most recently with Intel). Rich is in the process of starting a new business in the area of alternative investments.

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DATE: Friday, January 27th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER:Martin Zwick

TITLE: Complexity Theory and Political Change: Talcott Parsons Occupies Wall Street

ABSTRACT: Complexity theory can assist our understanding of social systems and social phenomena. This paper illustrates this assertion by linking Talcott Parsons' model of societal structure to the Occupy Wall Street movement. Parsons' model is used to organize ideas about the underlying causes of the recession that currently afflicts the US. While being too abstract to depict the immediate factors that precipitated this crisis, the model is employed to articulate the argument that vulnerability to this type of event results from flaws in societal structure. This implies that such crises can be avoided only if, in Parsons' terms, structural change occurs in the relations between polity, economy, community, and culture. The Occupy movement has called attention to the need for such fundamental change.

BIO: Martin Zwick was awarded his Ph.D. in Biophysics at MIT in 1968, and joined the Biophysics Department faculty of the University of Chicago in 1969. Initially working in crystallography and macromolecular structure, his interests shifted to systems theory and methodology, the field now known as the study of chaos, complexity, and complex adaptive systems. Since 1976 he has been teaching and doing research in the Systems Science PhD Program at Portland State University; during the years 1984-1989 he was director of the program.

His main research areas are information-theoretic modeling, machine learning, theoretical biology, game theory, and systems theory and philosophy. Scientifically, his focus is on applying systems theory and methodology to the natural and social sciences, most recently to biomedical data analysis, the evolution of cooperation, and sustainability. Philosophically, his focus is on how systems ideas relate to classical and contemporary philosophy, how they offer a bridge between science and religion, and how they can help us understand and address societal problems.

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SPRING 2012 SCHEDULE

 

 


 

DATE: Friday, April 6th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM

LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: B. Max Grad (a.k.a. Deadletter)

TITLE: Problem Solving and Information Processing in Human Systems

SUMMARY: A system is a unit with attributes in relation to its environment, and sub-units whose interactions manifest that attribute. Problem Solving, Bloom's Taxonomy, Individual and Group Identity Formation and Hall's Morphology of Systems all describe idealized processes for the formation of a system and its dynamic relation with the environment. Taken together, we can abstract a generic systems process, in which adaptive systems draw information from their environment, process it, choose a goal, and learn to enact that goal back onto the environment, including the role of recursion and reflection. After establishing the abstract construct, I will explore its usefulness in the realm of education and social change.

BIO: B. Max Grad has a Master's in Teaching from Seattle University and an B.A. in History, Social Studies and Mathematics.  After teaching mathematics at the high school level for 6 years,he left the teaching field to pursue a PhD in Systems Science at PSU. His interest is in the nature and structure of learning in individuals, groups and societies.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:

https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.F9C036DC5C803D8988EBA6BEE53C5A

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DATE: Friday, April 13th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM

LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Lee Hullender Rubin, DAOM, LAc

TITLE: Traditional Chinese Medicine's Challenges in Research

SUMMARY: In this seminar, the challenges facing Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) researchers will be discussed. A brief overview of TCM's approach to health and wellness, the challenges of researching this whole system of medicine, and a study on placebo acupuncture will be presented. We will discuss the effect of placebo acupuncture on research outcomes. Within this context, we will explore the double-blinded, randomized, controlled trial design role in TCM research.

BIO: Lee Hullender Rubin is a doctor of acupuncture and oriental medicine with more than ten years of clinical experience. She is board certified in acupuncture, Chinese herbs and reproductive medicine. She relocated to Portland, OR, last year to pursue clinical research training at the Oregon Health Science University Human Investigations Program and a post doctoral research fellowship at the Oregon College of Oriental Medicine (OCOM).

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.5E2B722396DAED802F4991DE2401C3

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DATE: Friday, April 20th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM

LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Sergio Antoy

TITLE: Programming with Narrowing

SUMMARY: In this talk, I will introduce narrowing, the characterizing feature of functional logic programming.  Narrowing promotes non-determinism and it enables computing with incomplete or unknown information. After a short and informal presentation of Curry, the leading functional logic language, I will discuss a few examples showing that narrowing and its associated non-determinism support very high-level programming.

BIO:  Sergio Antoy is a professor of Computer Science at Portland State University, that he joined in 1990, and an associate chair for graduate education. He regularly teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in the area of programming.  He received a PhD degree in Computer Science for the University of Maryland in 1987.  Sergio's research is on narrowing strategies and the implementation of functional logic programming languages.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.6AACDAFE663EF1AC735784AEAA1BFA

 

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DATE: Friday, April 27th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM

LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Stephen Shervais

TITLE: Satisficing vs.Exploring in Multistage Processes

SUMMARY: When is satisficing instead of exploring optimal for managing multistage processes? While normally thought of as an approach for risk averse decision makers with limited resources, satisficing often provides an efficient strategy for applying existing knowledge to complex problems in non-stationary environments. We present a series of simulation studies that demonstrate that a satisficing strategy produces significantly higher payoffs than traditional mixture strategies employed by approximate dynamic programming methods for learning to control multistage processes. We find that satisficing agents have a significantly higher per step payoff than agents that explore the environment over a time horizon sufficient for all agents to learn the optimal policy for the environment. A satisficing agent will take longer to learn the optimal policy, but will complete significantly more tasks in an equivalent time period and thus accumulate a significantly larger reward. Further more, the satisficing agents may learn in parallel without loss of efficiency, so multiple agents may be used to reduce the time to learn the optimal policy. Within the class of strategies characterized by stationary mixtures, satisficing is optimal for managing multistage processes in many uncertain environments.

BIO:  Stephen Shervais is an Associate Professor of Management Information Systems at Eastern Washington University.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.4B1F7998F91249BDBC79DA98453A30

 

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DATE: Friday, May 4th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Bart Massey

TITLE: Understand "Inform 7" as an Ontological Modeling Language

SUMMARY: Graham Nelson's Inform 7 is an ambitious domain-specific programming language for writing Interactive Fiction (IF, aka "text adventure") stories. The most prominent surface feature of Inform is its natural-language syntax. (For example, the title of this talk is a valid Inform sentence.) Less noticeable but more important is the underlying ontology-building language. Inform supports a rich set of concepts including actions, rules, relations, definitions, time, place and state. This conceptual power enables building ontological models that are at once reasonably rich and reasonably manageable. As a result, Inform is more than an IF language: it is a systems description language.

In this talk I will explain the basics of ontology-building and Inform, and argue that the richness of description Inform provides is a requirement for building system ontologies that are worth the trouble.

BIO:  Bart Massey is an Associate Professor of Computer Science at Portland State University, with a Ph.D. in Artificial Intelligence from the University of Oregon's Computational Intelligence Research Lab. Bart's previous work in this area includes supervising a M.S. thesis on ontology-building in multiuser text adventure games.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:

https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.59C7A24ED960787A06509AD2F804CB

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DATE: Friday, May 11th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM

 

LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Shelby Anderson

TITLE: Ceramic Sourcing and Social Networks in Northwest Alaska

SUMMARY: Social networks are essential to human occupation of Arctic environments. Access to non-local goods through networks is also linked to the development of more complex social organization in northern hunter-gatherers groups. Ceramic geochemical and formal data are used to test hypotheses about the nature and extent of networks over the last 1000 years in Northwest Alaska, a period characterized by significant social and environmental change. Results suggest ceramics were circulating more widely than expected and hint at changes in raw material procurement strategies during the study period that may be related to shifts in mobility or networking strategies.  Methodological issues associated with applying standard analytical techniques to northern ceramics are also considered with reference to future research.

BIO:  Shelby Anderson is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Portland State University.  She received her Ph.D. from the University of Washington in 2011.  Her research interests include past hunter-gatherer social and technological change, human-environment interactions, ceramic technology, public archaeology and archaeology of the Arctic, Sub-arctic and Pacific Northwest.  Shelby also has a long-term interest in contributing long-term archaeological data on human-environment interactions to modern efforts to cope with climate change in the Arctic and beyond.  She has pursued these interests through various work and research experiences in Washington, Utah, Colorado, the Russian Far East and Alaska. More info: http://web.pdx.edu/~ashelby/index.html

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.13D0DD7DD2F39D13FCC4EFB1B520A8
DATE: Friday, May 18th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Mehmet Vurkaç

TITLE: Bayesian and Related Methods: Techniques Based on Bayes' Theorem

SUMMARY: Bayes' theorem is a simple algebraic consequence of conditional probability. Yet, its consequences are critical to philosophy, society, and technology. Starting from its simple derivation, we will show how its interpretation in terms of base rates (priors) and class-conditional likelihoods illuminates everyday problems in medicine and law, and provides signal processing, communications, machine learning, model selection, and other applications of statistics with powerful classification and estimation tools. Next, we will briefly examine some of the ways in which this theorem can be adopted to include multiple attributes, contexts, hypotheses, and levels of risk. Methods derived from or related to Bayes’ theorem include minimax, maximum-a posteriori (MAP), expectation maximization (EM), Markov random fields, hidden Markov models, the Kalman filter, the Viterbi algorithm, and Bayesian Belief Networks.

BIO:  Mehmet Vurkaç is currently an Assistant Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering & Renewable Energy at the Oregon Institute of Technology. He completed his Ph.D. in Electrical & Computer Engineering at Portland State University in 2011. Vurkaç has a B.A. in Math-Physics from Whitman College (1993), and an M.S. in ECE from Portland State University (1999). He has worked in the music industry (Roland Corp.) for four years as a hardware engineer, and served as an adjunct instructor at PSU’s ECE department (2004–09) and at Whitman College in the Music Department (Sound Synthesis, 1994). His dissertation research was in Neural Networks, Reconstructability Analysis, and Computational Ethnomusicology. His current research is in tempo-tracking and onset detection for Afro-Brazilian music in which Eurocentric priors for timing and accent structure do not always hold., Publications:
  • On the Need for Clave-Direction Analysis: A New Arena for Educational and Creative Applications of Music Technology.  Journal of Music, Technology and Education. Volume 4, Number 1, pp. 27–46, August, 2011.
  • A Cross-Cultural Grammar for Temporal Harmony in Afro-Latin Musics: Clave, Partido-Alto and Other Timelines.  Current Musicology. Number 94, Accepted, Fall 2012.
Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.43B40A9E6241B3781A08B05BA8ABA4


DATE: Friday, May 25th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER:  Jeff Fletcher and Martin Zwick

TITLE: Levels of Altruism 

SUMMARY: The phenomenon of altruism extends from the biological realm to the human sociocultural realm.  This paper sketches a coherent outline of multiple types of altruism of progressively increasing scope that span these two realms and are grounded in an ever-expanding sense of “self.” Discussion of this framework notes difficulties associated with altruisms at different levels. It links scientific ideas about the evolution of cooperation and about hierarchical order to perennial philosophical and religious concerns. It offers a conceptual background for inquiry into societal challenges that call for altruistic behavior, especially the challenge of environmental and social sustainability.

This talk was presented at the Northwest Philosophy Conference at Lewis and Clark College on Nov 4-5, 2011. The text of this talk can be found at: http://www.pdx.edu/sysc/sites/www.pdx.edu.sysc/files/altruism_npc_0.pdf 

BIOs: Jeff Fletcher's research focuses on understanding the relationship among different theories of the evolution of altruism. He is also interested in the role human cooperation plays in addressing societal challenges such as sustainability (including environmental, social, and economic) and how understanding social dilemmas can help facilitate cooperation. His involvement in the debate over how altruism evolves has led him to an interest in better understanding (and making more explicit) the role that models play in scientific inquiry. As a teacher he is also interested in how best to bring systems ideas to students of all ages. Jeff completed an NSF International Postdoctoral Fellowship at the University of British Columbia where he did research in the Department of Zoology and taught in the Integrated Science Program. He currently teaches in both the University Studies Program and the Systems Science Graduate Program at PSU. Jeff has a BS in Biology, an MS in Computer Science, and a Ph.D. in Systems Science.

Martin Zwick has been a core Systems Science faculty member since 1976. His main interests are information theoretic modeling, theoretical biology, and systems theory and philosophy. Scientifically, his focus is on applying systems theory and methodology to the natural and social sciences, especially to biomedical data analysis, the evolution of cooperation, and sustainability. Philosophically, his focus is on how systems ideas relate to classical and contemporary philosophy, how they offer a bridge between science and religion, and how they can help us understand and address societal problems.

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.E5ADFD07DCAE2B241431CAAA4E5D56

DATE: Friday, June 1st, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER:  Dick Hamlet

TITLE: The Intersection between Science and Computer Science is almost Empty

SUMMARY: Traditionally, a science such as physics overlaps with mathematics and engineering in a way that has been astonishingly productive.  The math provides precise expression for the science, which in turn supplies the engineering with the information it needs to exploit physical phenomena. Computer science naturally wishes to put itself in the center of the traditional picture as a science. Unfortunately, it won't wash.  The `science' of programming is pure and simple mathematics, not science.  The distinction is more than linguistic, since science and mathematics have quite distinct goals and methods. By making the wrong choice, computer science research has been saddled with an extraneous requirement to `experiment', and its mathematics has not been properly exploited. Without science, `software engineers' have been cast adrift with a huge `software problem' that better mathematics might hope to solve.

 BIO: Dick Hamlet is Professor Emeritus in Computer Science at Portland State University.  He has been active in software development and research for almost 50 years, as a programmer, manager, teacher, and researcher. He was a member of the software engineering research group at the University of Maryland for 12 years, a visiting lecturer at University of Melbourne in 1982, a Fulbright scholar at National University of Ireland, Galway (NUIG), in 1998-99, and E.T.S. Walton Fellow at NUIG in 2003-4. He is the author of three textbooks, a monograph, and more than 50 refereed conference and journal publications.  He has implemented major software systems for two programming languages, the first mutation testing system, a transportable image-processing system, a prototyping system for testing tools, and a software-component composition package. He holds a BS (electrical engineering) from the University of Wisconsin, MS (engineering physics) from Cornell, and PhD (computer science) from the University of Washington. 
Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.1DD08418932D811FE8D128CAED312E


DATE: Friday, June 8th, 2012, 12:00 - 12:50 PM
LOCATION: Harder House, Room 104
PRESENTER: Feng Liu

TITLE: Re-Cinematography: Bridging the Gap between Amateur and Professional

SUMMARY: The increasing availability of cameras means that one is always on hand to capture an interesting moment. However, a good video is difficult to capture. The quality gap between professional and amateur-level video remains remarkably wide. One of the biggest components of this gap is camera motion. This talk will describe our work on re-cinematography that allows a user to transform their hand-held shaky videos to have the appearance of an idealized camera motion, such as a tracking shot, as a post-processing step.

Re-cinematography addresses the two challenges in improving camera motion: where and how to move video content to have a good camera motion. The first problem is difficult because no existing motion model is both easy to compute and models camera motion well. 3D model is difficult to compute while 2D model cannot handle video with parallax. Re-cinematography estimates eigen feature trajectories that can model the apparent motion of a video well and can be computed online. The second problem is challenging because it requires rendering a novel view. Existing methods for novel view synthesis cannot handle scene dynamics and parallax simultaneously. Re-cinematography solves this problem with a content-preserving warping method that create each output frame from only its corresponding input frame according to the target motion. These two techniques together lead to a re-cinematography system that offers the first method that both achieves high-quality camera motion and is practical enough for consumer applications. The Warp Stabilizer in Adobe After Effects CS 5.5 is largely based on this work.

 BIO: Dr. Feng Liu received his Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in August 2010 and joined Portland State University as an Assistant Professor in September 2010. His research interests include computer graphics, vision, and multimedia. He received the Best Thesis Award in the Computer Sciences Department at UW-Madison for his work on computational cinematography. He was named as one of the IBM Watson Emerging Leaders in Multimedia '08. One of his papers was nominated for the Best Paper Award at ACM Multimedia’ 07. His research on video stabilization has been incorporated into Adobe products. Dr. Liu served on program committees for IEEE CVPR 2012, IEEE ICCV 2011, ACM Multimedia 2011, 3DIMPVT 2011,  Pacific Graphics 2011, etc. He also serves as a reviewer for numerous conferences and journals, including ACM SIGGRAPH, ACM SIGGRAPH Asia, Eurographics, ACM Transactions on Graphics, IEEE Transactions on Multimedia, IEEE Transactions on Image Processing, International Journal of Computer Vision, etc. 

Here is the link for people who want to attend our seminar remotely:
https://sas.elluminate.com/m.jnlp?sid=2009262&password=M.28ABD3E822E84B4A0B98308DC03457