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Seminar Archive 2006

 

 


Date:
December 1, 2006

Location:
Harder House, Room 104

Time:
12-1 pm

Presenter(s):
Lars Holmstrom

Title:
Two Birds With One Stone: Funding Your Dissertation

Abstract:
For many PhD students, two large hurdles include completion of a dissertation proposal and staying funded throughout the process of completing the dissertation. One angle for funding this process is dissertation grants, which are available from a number of institutions covering a range of research topics. There is substantial overlap between these grant proposals and the dissertation proposal. For seminar this week, we will continue the focus of last week's talk on grant writing with a description of the components that go into a dissertation proposal and a dissertation grant proposal. The goal is to encourage students pursuing a PhD to maximize the effort that goes into a dissertation proposal by using much of the content to apply for dissertation funding.

Bio(s):
Lars Holmstrom, aspiring Systems Science PhD student

File attached or Link to Recording?
None



Date:
November 17, 2006

Location:
Harder House, Room 104

Time:
12-1 pm

Presenter(s):
Wayne Wakeland

Title:
Introduction to Writing Grant Proposals

Abstract:
Writing a successful grant proposal depends on telling a compelling story. For major funding sources such as NIH and NSF, most of the review panel members will read carefully only the abstract, which is less than a page long. The rest of the proposal will be reviewed in detail by 2 or 3 members of the panel. Of course, the entire proposal must be clearly written and responsive to the RFP in order to garner the enthusiastic support of the assigned readers, but without a great abstract, the proposal has no chance of being funded. This seminar presentation will provide the highlights from a grant-writing workshop that Wayne attended recently.

Bio(s):
Wayne is a core Systems Science faculty member with a wide variety of research interests, including topics related to computer simulation and sustainability.

File attached or Link to Recording?
.ppt



Date:
October 27, 2006

Location:
Harder House, Room 104

Time:
12-1 pm

Presenter(s):
Rich Jolly, Chris Bartio, Kelly Waugh, and David Angel

Title:
System Science Program Strategic Analysis

Abstract:
This past summer, as part of the SYSC 610: Organizational Theory and Dynamics class, our group conducted a study of the current challenges and opportunities facing the Systems Science program. The goal of this project was to assist the Systems Science program in the development of a strategic plan.

The data collection for this project consisted of primarily 12 interviews. These interviews included current and former students, faculty from within the program and associated departments and members of the program management chain (provost and vice-provost). The interviews were designed to uncover the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to the Systems Science program. The data collected from interviews was supplemented by 10 years of enrollment data as well as a report generated by Michael Dejardin about other Systems Science related programs around the country.

Bio(s):
Rich Jolly is a PhD candidate in Systems Science and the School of Business. His research focus is on the use of systems science techniques to solve some of the tough business organizational problems such as effective sharing of information and knowledge. Rich works as a strategic marketing manager at Intel.

Chris Bartlo has been a student of the Systems Science program for the past two years. He has worked in the NWCIL and is currently an educator at OMSI. His interest is in using systems ideas and techniques to enhance and develop interactive learning experiences.

Kelly Waugh is a second year PhD student in the Systems Science PhD core program. His research interests are in the application of Systems Science methods to Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness. Kelly works as a Quality Program Manager at Sun Microsystems.

David Angel is a Graduate of the ETM Masters program at PSU. He is currently employed as a Systems Administrator at Siltronic Corporation and has recently taken a few Systems Science classes for personal development.

File attached or Link to Recording?
None



Date:
October 20, 2006

Location:
Harder House, Room 104

Time:
12-1 pm

Presenter(s):
Professor Bruce Lusignan

Title:
International Space Projects

Abstract:
At the end of the Cold War, U.S. and Russian engineers planned to convert cold-war budgets to planetary exploration. The Stanford-Russian Mars study showed it could be done at a fraction of the cost of a US-only project; but cooperation faded away. The "Stanford on the Moon" project proposes cooperation to put an International Lunar Observatory on the Moon by 2015. Stanford has already launched student-made small satellites to earth orbit on a Russian SS-18 rocket, and plans a future launch to orbit the Moon. Cooperation for a manned mission in the future would include the Europe, Russia and China as well as the United States. The Stanford-Russian study and the proposed Lunar projects will be described.

Bio(s):
Professor Lusignan has taught Space-Systems Engineering at Stanford for 30 years. He headed the Stanford-Russian study. This year he's at PSU on sabbatical and will be permanently at PSU in January.

File attached or Link to Recording?
None



Date:
October 13, 2006

Location:
Harder House, Room 104

Time:
12-1 pm

Presenter(s):
Rich Jolly, Chris Bartio, Kelly Waugh, and David Angel

Title:
System Science Program Strategic Analysis

Abstract:
This past summer, as part of the SYSC 610: Organizational Theory and Dynamics class, our group conducted a study of the current challenges and opportunities facing the Systems Science program. The goal of this project was to assist the Systems Science program in the development of a strategic plan.

The data collection for this project consisted of primarily 12 interviews. These interviews included current and former students, faculty from within the program and associated departments and members of the program management chain (provost and vice-provost). The interviews were designed to uncover the strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats to the Systems Science program. The data collected from interviews was supplemented by 10 years of enrollment data as well as a report generated by Michael Dejardin about other Systems Science related programs around the country.

Bio(s):
Rich Jolly is a PhD candidate in Systems Science and the School of Business. His research focus is on the use of systems science techniques to solve some of the tough business organizational problems such as effective sharing of information and knowledge. Rich works as a strategic marketing manager at Intel.

Chris Bartlo has been a student of the Systems Science program for the past two years. He has worked in the NWCIL and is currently an educator at OMSI. His interest is in using systems ideas and techniques to enhance and develop interactive learning experiences.

Kelly Waugh is a second year PhD student in the Systems Science PhD core program. His research interests are in the application of Systems Science methods to Leadership and Organizational Effectiveness. Kelly works as a Quality Program Manager at Sun Microsystems.

David Angel is a Graduate of the ETM Masters program at PSU. He is currently employed as a Systems Administrator at Siltronic Corporation and has recently taken a few Systems Science classes for personal development.

File attached or Link to Recording?
None



Date:
October 6, 2006

Location:
Harder House, Room 104

Time:
12-1 pm

Presenter(s):
Christine V. Portfors, PhD
School of Biological Sciences
Washington State University

Title:
Neural responses to complex sounds in the auditory midbrain

Abstract:
A fundamental function of the auditory system in humans is to process speech. Both speech sounds and vocalizations of other animals are complex in that they are comprised of many frequency elements that vary over time. When these sounds are first encoded by the cochlea in the inner ear, they are broken down into their individual frequency elements and single neurons respond to individual frequency elements. However, to enable perception of the whole sound, neurons in the auditory system likely recombine the individual frequency elements in the appropriate temporal order. In other words, individual neurons integrate multiple frequency elements over time. The first site in the ascending auditory system where individual neurons integrate across frequency elements in complex sounds is the inferior colliculus (IC). In this talk, I will discuss how individual neurons in the IC of bats and mice respond to pure tones, combinations of tones and natural vocalizations. I will focus on neurons that display nonlinear interactions to the combination of two sounds with energy in different frequency bands and show how these types of neurons may be involved in encoding natural vocalizations.

Focus of my laboratory -
My long term research goals are to understand how complex sounds are processed by the auditory system and to determine how age-related hearing loss impacts this processing. To achieve these goals, I utilize a systems-level neuroethological approach that makes use of my broad academic training from behavior to neurophysiology and neuroanatomy. I use natural vocalizations to probe the neural mechanisms underlying encoding of species-specific vocalizations in the auditory brainstem, midbrain and cortex of awake animals. I employ both mustached bats and mice as model systems because of their rich repertoires of complex species-specific vocalizations and my ability to record from individual neurons under awake conditions in these animals. I enhance my research program through collaborations with computational neuroscientists and neuroanatomists.

Bio(s):
None

File attached or Link to Recording?
None



Date:
May 26, 2006

Location:
Harder House, Room 104

Time:
12-1 pm

Presenter(s):
Sean Larsen

Title:
Proofs and Refutations in the Undergraduate Mathematics Classroom

Abstract:
In his 1976 book, Proofs and refutations, Imre Lakatos makes the observation that mathematical concepts often develop in the service of answering a mathematical question. For example, Lakatos describes how the concept of uniform convergence was generated through the analysis of proofs of the naive conjecture that the limit of a series of continuous functions is continuous. Lakatos contends that this happened through a process he calls "proofs and refutations". This process begins with a naive conjecture and a proof of the conjecture. The proof is then analyzed to find hidden lemmas, which may be incorporated into the hypotheses of the theorem (and may necessitate the defining of new concepts). The purpose of this talk is to share two classroom episodes in which undergraduate mathematics students were engaged in a similar process. One episode is drawn from an introductory group theory course and the other from a college geometry course. The analysis of these episodes will illustrate Lakatos' ideas and the potential of these ideas to inform instructional design

Bio(s):
Sean Larsen received his PhD in mathematics from Arizona State University in 2004. This is his second year teaching at PSU. His current research focuses on the teaching and learning of advanced undergraduate mathematics and on the mathematical preparation of teachers.

File attached or Link to Recording?
None



Date:
March 10, 2006

Location:
Harder House, Room 104

Time:
12-1 pm

Presenter(s):
David Ostberg

Title:
A Comparative Analysis of Artificial Neural Networks, Classification Trees, and Multivariate Linear Regression for Predicting Retail Employee Tenure and Turnover

Abstract:
Two methodological studies were carried out to empirically demonstrate the value of applying neural network modeling for predicting three selected employee job performance criteria; namely, employee tenure, eligibility for rehire, and voluntary/involuntary termination classification.

Overall, the findings suggest that neural modeling techniques offer a viable alternative to traditional predictive approaches, and further, may lend insight into potential relationships among variables that may be overlooked when using conventional analyses. These studies also suggest that the different modeling techniques may vary in usefulness for different prediction contexts, in particular, where there are significant "cost" differences between false positive or false negative predictions.

Bio(s):
David Ostberg joined Unicru in January 2001 and is responsible for assessment design, advanced data analytics, technical writing, selection science consulting, and client-specific validation of the Unicru personnel selection assessment products. While at Unicru, David has facilitated development and deployment of a range of assessment tools in a variety of industries including casual dining, hospitality, grocery, and retail.

David received a Ph.D. in Systems Science: Psychology from Portland State University, and has a BS degree in Psychology from the University of Colorado at Boulder in 1994. David is a member of and reviewer for the Society for Industrial & Organizational Psychology and the American Psychological Associations, and has presented research papers in several peer-reviewed academic conferences.

Prior to joining Unicru, David worked as a consulting job analyst and has conducted job analyses on over 200 job positions for various organizations in the Pacific Northwest. Additionally, he has developed numerous personnel selection and performance management systems and has taught undergraduate courses in industrial/organizational psychology, human motivation, and research design at Portland State University in Portland, Oregon.

File attached or Link to Recording?
None