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Wellness and Equity

A spotlight on food justice: What does farm-to-table really mean?

Many of those who work to put food on our plates cannot afford to feed themselves. Food labor— including cultivating, harvesting, sorting, packaging, processing, transporting, marketing, retailing, preparing, and serving food—constitutes over half of all human labor. Yet, this work remains largely invisible to consumers.

Using community voice and mapping to improve healthy food access

Historically, the voice and involvement of community members are diminished or ignored when researchers study problems uniquely faced by disadvantaged communities. This can lead to a disconnect where programs and solutions are developed without the necessary buy-in from community members, rendering the success of any interventions and strategies vulnerable. 

Taking on displacement and gentrification effects in Cully

This blog post was written by Karri Benjamin, Julienna Cates, and Angela Spencer, students in the fall term Health and Social Inequalities class. Photos courtesy of Verde. 

Winona LaDuke, live from Portland State

On October 22, activist, environmentalist, and two-time vice presidential candidate Winona LaDuke delivered the keynote address for Campus Sustainability Day to approximately 1,000 people at Portland State University's Stott Center. Her talk, titled "Grassroots Strategies for Mitigating Climate Change," can be viewed below.

How talking about race can help combat climate change

Antwi Akom has many great stories to tell. Infuriating stories. Sad stories. Stories that force you to question what you think you know about other people’s realities, and your own. In 2005, Akom was falsely arrested for going into his own faculty office at San Francisco State University to get books to prepare for his class the next day.

Speaking of inequity, a sustainability essential

Social justice is a difficult subject. It can be uncomfortable to talk about, even to think about. Regardless of who you are, or how compassionate, open, and caring, chances are you have some form of bias ingrained in you—from your upbringing, from pop culture, from media, education, personal experiences. Many people don’t like to acknowledge that these biases exist, which is one reason they can be uncomfortable to confront and discuss. But ignoring the issue is an even bigger problem.

Beyond graduation: Celebrating lifelong changemakers

Architecture major Paul Thanakorn Vorapanich will be graduating this spring, taking his powerful newfound goals and expertise into the world as one of PSU’s many changemakers—people who fearlessly seek out solutions to problems others say cannot be solved. Watch Paul’s story, and then join us on June 20 for a celebration and exploration of lifelong changemakers at the Elevating Impact Summit in downtown Portland.

Reconnecting nature and human health

When hiking in the gorge or swimming in one of Oregon’s many rivers, the connection between human health and nature seems intuitive. Nature gives us a place to get out, to roam, to sweat, to be calm—all things that tend to have a positive impact on our wellbeing, and, perhaps more importantly, can help keep us out of doctors’ offices and hospitals.  

Cultivate personal sustainability this spring

“The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak.” - Hans Hoffman On April 22, we will celebrate Earth Day! When you consider the health of the earth, do you think about how your personal well-being supports sustainability? Each day, we breathe air, drink water, and eat food that literally is the earth. From our bodies, these life elements then continue cycling through the earth’s living systems. Each of us also participates in social, cultural and economic systems. By creating personal balance and health, we are supporting sustainability.

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