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Bill (William Tate), Film and Dialects
Bill (William Tate), Film and Dialects

William Tate has taught in the School of Theatre and Film since 1968, also serving variously as Department Chair for 14 years, Secondary Education Advisor, Graduate Advisor, and Associate Dean. He specializes in film courses at present, and also teaches dialects. Beloved by students for the unpredictable accents that sneak into his every conversation, Tate has also worked as a dialect consultant and coach for productions at Artists Repertory Theatre, Triangle Productions, and CoHo Theater. Tate's recent PSU directing credits include Blithe Spirit (2006), Tony Kushner's adaptation of Bertolt Brecht's The Good Person of Sezuan (2004), Colin Teevan's adaptation of Euripedes' IPH (2000), John Millington Synge's The Playboy of the Western World (2000), and Anton Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard (1999). Tate has directed over 30 productions, and has also performed major roles in over 25 productions including Arthur Miller's The Crucible as Deputy Governor Danforth in 2001 (a role for which he was awarded a Drammy in 2002 for Best Actor in a Supporting Role), Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee's Inherit the Wind (2002) as Matthew Harrison Brady, and in readers' theater presentations of Sean O'Casey's Shadow of a Gunman (2000) as Seamus, Arthur Laurents' Time of the Cuckoo (2001) as Renato DiRossi, and Ernest Thompson's The Constituent (2003) as the Curmudgeon. He is a recipient of the Hoffman Award, and holds an MA from the University of Birmingham, UK, and he was PSU's first ever student Fulbright recipient.