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Alumni in the News: Outtakes Online: Greer gets a taste of stardom
Author: By Mike Gordon, Honolulu Post
Posted: August 13, 2013

Read the original article here

Ryan Greer doesn’t view himself as a movie star, so you can’t blame him for being a bit surprised by the reaction he got the other day at Dave’s Ice Cream in Wai­ma­nalo.

Ryan Greer, middle, with Steven Parker, left, and Chuck Mitsui. (Courtesy photo)Ryan Greer, middle, with Steven Parker, left, and Chuck Mitsui. (Courtesy photo)

 

The young women working behind the counter recognized him right away as the star of the locally made indie film “One Kine Day.” And even though the film has been a hit with film festival audiences since 2010 and available as a Redbox rental since last year, the 26-year-old Greer has not become a household name — except maybe in Enchanted Lake, where he grew up.

But public awareness of “One Kine Day” has ascended to new levels since it became available last month on Netflix.

“It was so fun,” Greer said of that day in Wai­ma­nalo. “The girls that worked there were so fanning out. They were, ‘Oh, my God, I can’t believe you are here.’ I said I’m just a regular guy who grew up in Kai­lua, but it didn’t seem to matter.”

Greer played Ralsto, a young ne’er-do-well skater who discovers his 15-year-old girlfriend, Alea, is pregnant. The film, which takes place up and down Oahu’s Windward side, follows Ralsto as he tries to raise money for an abortion. It’s sad and charming and honest all at the same time.

“One Kine Day” is Greer’s only film credit, shot in the summer of 2009 while he was a student at Portland State University. He graduated last year with a biology degree and a career arc that may take him to medical school instead of acting classes.

Greer doesn’t want to sound pretentious about his celebrity status. The whole thing is somewhat embarrassing, he said.

He likes to point out to fans the places he has worked in Kai­lua and that they’ve probably already met.

“Most of the people who recognize me are from Hawaii or my town or towns nearby,” he said. “I just feel like one of them. They are people I probably interacted with at some point. It’s not like I am some special person. I’m just their neighbor.”