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Core Body of Knowledge for Oregon's Childhood Care and Education Profession

 

Table of Contents


A Guide to the Core Body of Knowledge

This guide for the Core Body of Knowledge will be used by a broad range of individuals in the childhood care and education profession, for a variety of purposes.

  • Childhood care and education professionals will use this guide to select community-based training, create a plan to acquire the core body of knowledge,and move to desired steps on the Oregon Registry.
  • Trainers and professional organizations will use this guide to plan community-based training to support professionals in acquiring knowledge appropriate to their level of professional development.
  • Administrators and directors will use this guide to support employees through professional development planning.
  • State agencies will use this guide to provide background for policy and planning related to benchmarks, certification and registration, scholarship, compensation, and program participation.
  • Higher education will use this guide to provide a basis for articulation from community based training to degree completion.
  • Oregon Registry review teams will use this guide as a basis for analyzing community-based training of Oregon Registry applicants.

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Core Body of Knowledge

The Core Body of Knowledge is the basis for the training and education essential for on-going professional development in the childhood care and education profession.

  • Ten specific core knowledge categories make up the Core Body of Knowledge for Oregon's Childhood Care and Education Profession: Diversity; Families & Community Systems; Health, Safety & Nutrition; Human Growth & Development; Learning Environments & Curriculum; Observation & Assessment; Personal, Professional & Leadership Development; Program Management; Special Needs; and Understanding & Guiding Behavior.
  • Key concepts are the big ideas in each core knowledge category.
  • Sets of knowledge are the progression of increased depth and breadth of knowledge within each core knowledge category. Each set provides increased knowledge on how to place that knowledge into practice in professional work. The three sets of knowledge are Set One (Introductory Knowledge) Oregon Registry Steps 1 - 7, Set Two (Intermediate Knowledge), Oregon Registry Steps 7.5 - 9, and Set Three (Advanced Knowledge) Oregon Registry Steps 9.5 – 10.
  • Standards are what the professional is learning within each core knowledge category and within each set of knowledge.
  • Steps are the sequence from Enrollment through Step 12 in the Oregon Registry. Each step represents increased training and education in the Core Body of Knowledge.
  • Supporting explanations are explanations of how the key concepts in each core knowledge category relate to best practices and to the everyday work with children, youth and families.
  • Sample Topics are examples of topics a professional may look for in training sessions, or topics a trainer may use to plan training sessions, workshops, seminars, and other professional development activities that would meet the requirements for core knowledge in the Oregon Registry.
  • The Core Body of Knowledge for Oregon's Childhood Care and Education Profession provides a foundation for both the Oregon Registry and the Oregon Registry Trainer Program.

Please read The Profession: Appendix A for information regarding the profession of Childhood Care and Education.
Please read The System: Appendix B for information regarding the Oregon Registry, Oregon Registry Trainer Program, Oregon’s Professional Development System, and Oregon’s Childhood Care and Education Infrastructure.
Please read The Process: Appendix C for information regarding the development of the Core Body of Knowledge for Oregon's Childhood Care and Education Profession.

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A Guide on How to Read and Understand the Core Body of Knowledge

For each of the 10 core knowledge categories there is a multiple-page table containing the following:

Title and definition of the core knowledge category
A specific area of knowledge. The total of all of the 10 core knowledge categories combined make up the Core Body of Knowledge for Oregon's Childhood Care and Education Profession

Key Concepts:
The big ideas in each core knowledge category
Supporting Explanations:
Explanations of how the key concepts in each core knowledge category relate to best practices, and to the everyday work with children, youth and families

 

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10

The first of three groups or sets of knowledge providing introductory knowledge in the core knowledge category.

What the professional is learning in Set One includes:

  • Awareness
  • Basic Principles
  • Definition
  • Description
  • Explanation
  • Fundamentals
  • Identification
  • Introduction
  • Overview
  • Understanding

The second of three groups or sets of knowledge providing intermediate knowledge in the core knowledge category.

What the professional is learning in Set Two includes:

  • Application
  • Development
  • Examination
  • Exploration
  • Implementation
  • Influences
  • Links
  • Practice
  • Selection
  • Strategies

The third of three groups or sets of knowledge providing advanced knowledge in the core knowledge category.

What the professional is learning in Set Three includes:

  • Analysis
  • Comparison
  • Critical Examination
  • Evaluation
  • In-depth Study
  • Interrelationships
  • Research
  • Theories

 

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10

For Professionals:
Examples of some of the topics that a professional may look for/take in training sessions, workshops, seminars, and other professional development activities that would meet the requirements for knowledge for Oregon Registry Steps 1 - 7.

For Trainers:
Examples of some of the topics that trainers may use to develop training sessions and other professional development activities that would meet the requirements for knowledge for Oregon Registry Steps 1 - 7.

For Professionals:
Examples of some of the topics that a professional may look for/take in training sessions, workshops, seminars, and other professional development activities that would meet the requirements for knowledge for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5 - 9.

For Trainers:
Examples of some of the topics that trainers may use to develop training sessions and other professional development activities that would meet the requirements for knowledge for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5 - 9.

For Professionals:
Examples of some of the topics that a professional may look for/take in training sessions, workshops, seminars, and other professional development activities that would meet the requirements for knowledge for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5 - 10.

For Trainers:
Examples of some of the topics that trainers may use to develop training sessions and other professional development activities that would meet the requirements for knowledge for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5 - 10.

 

Questions?
If you have questions on how to use this guide to the Core Body of Knowledge, the Oregon Registry, the Oregon Registry Trainer Program, or the Oregon Professional Development System, please contact the Oregon Center for Career Development in Childhood Care and Education, toll free phone 1 (877) 725-8535, Fax (503) 725-5430, Email centerline@pdx.edu or, website www.centerline.pdx.edu.

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Core Knowledge Categories

Diversity
Knowledge of differences in race, gender, ability, age, language, family composition, culture, ethnicity, socio-economic status, and/or religion. Weaving anti-bias awareness throughout all program activities and learning environments for children and youth.

Families & Community Systems
Knowledge of the complex characteristics of children’s families and communities. Establishing respectful relationships and communication with family and community members.

Health, Safety & Nutrition
Knowledge of basic health, safety, and nutrition principles and practices. Knowledge of child abuse and neglect prevention, identification, reporting procedures, and therapeutic care. Promoting healthy choices and safety awareness with children and youth.

Human Growth & Development
Knowledge of social, emotional, cognitive and physical growth and development. Using developmentally appropriate practices and principles in programs for children and youth.

Learning Environments & Curriculum
Knowledge of the relationship between physical space, activities, experiences, and materials with child behavior, growth and development. Creating developmentally appropriate and culturally appropriate learning environments and curricula to foster optimum growth and development of children and youth.

Observation & Assessment
Knowledge of observation techniques, assessment tools, and documentation procedures for children and youth. Using observation and assessment to individualize learning experiences, improve the effectiveness of the learning environment, and support referrals for specialized services.

Personal, Professional & Leadership Development
Knowledge of childhood care and education as a profession with an identified body of knowledge, professional standards, professional ethics, and established systems. Participating in leadership, advocacy, personal growth, and professional development activities.

Program Management
Knowledge of accepted business practices, legal and regulatory requirements, financial obligations, and record keeping. Developing or implementing program policies, communication strategies, management plans, and sound financial practices.

Special Needs
Knowledge of disabilities and other special needs, related resources, and regulations/laws. Implementing an inclusive and sensitive practice with children and youth in partnership with families.

Understanding & Guiding Behavior
Knowledge of developmentally appropriate and culturally appropriate guidance theories, principles and practices. Providing positive guidance to foster self-esteem, self-regulation, constructive behavior, and positive relationships for children and youth.

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Diversity

Knowledge of differences in race, gender, ability, age, language, family composition, culture, ethnicity, socio-economic status, and/or religion. Weaving anti-bias awareness throughout all program activities and learning environments for children and youth

 

Key Concepts:

  • Acceptance and tolerance toward all differences can be promoted by infusing anti-bias awareness throughout all programs and learning environments.
  • Childhood care and education environments routines, and curricula can reflect the lives, cultures, and languages of families, children, youth, professional staff, and the community.
  • Parents and other family and community members are essential resources for diverse learning.
  • Assessment of individual development and growth is as unbiased as possible in all matters of diversity.
  • Personal values, attitudes, beliefs and biases can impact interactions with children, youth and adults.

Supporting Explanations:

People are diverse. The development of attitudes, preferences, and prejudice among children and youth depend greatly on the information they receive from the curriculum, environment, and people that surround them. Creating a safe and sensitive learning environment that respects and values the children, youth, families and staff is important.

All programs have children and/or youth and adults who come from families or communities exhibiting a variety of values and beliefs. People are diverse with regard to different rates of development, individual interests, special needs, temperaments, languages, cultures, and learning styles.

It is important to foster awareness, respect, and appreciation of individuals and families. This can be promoted by attending to differences in family strengths, structure, lifestyle, expectations, values, religions, customs, traditions, child rearing practices, and language.

Diversity Standards

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Awareness of personal culture, values, attitudes, beliefs and/or biases Exploration of the impact of culture values, attitudes, beliefs and/or biases on interactions Critical examination of the impact of culture, values, attitudes, beliefs, and/or biases on interactions and their implications
Definition of culture including sociological, anthropological, historical and/or psychological perspectives Examination of perspectives which shape cultural identity of self and others In depth study of the interrelationships between the cultural identity of self and others
Awareness of cultural aspects of communication Examination of the influences of cultural diversity on communication and interaction Comparison of modes of communication and interactions among mainstream and marginalized communities
Overview of basic principles for promoting anti-bias attitudes and practices among professionals, children, youth and families Development of activities and approaches that promote anti-bias attitudes and practices among professionals, children, youth and families In-depth study of anti-bias strategies, activities, and approaches and their impact on attitudes, approaches, and practices among professionals, children, youth and families
Awareness of environments and activities that reflect cultures and home languages of children and/or youth in the program Development of culturally and linguistically appropriate programs and environments reflecting families and communities being served Critical examination of the links between culturally and linguistically relevant programs and practices and child development
Awareness of environments and activities that reflect a diverse community and society Development of culturally diverse programs and environments Critical examination of theories of bias and social justice
Discussion of assessment tools that use unbiased methods in all matters of diversity Examination or application of assessment tools that use unbiased methods in all matters of diversity Critical examination, comparison or evaluation of assessment tools that use unbiased methods in all matters of diversity

Diversity Sample Topics

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Criteria for judging a curriculum’s anti-bias content

Norms, mores and/or traditions in cultures and/or lifestyles

Defining culture

Incorporating home language, and linguistically and culturally diverse routines

Family and community members as resources for multicultural learning

Environments and materials that reflect the cultures and/or home languages of children and/or youth in the program

How cultural and/or language differences affect creative expression

Supporting bilingual development

Multicultural environments and materials

Unbiased assessment

Identifying personal values, attitudes, beliefs, and biases

Sign language as a home language
Infusing anti-bias throughout all programs and learning environments

Incorporating cultures relevant to participating families and staff

Activities and materials addressing learning styles, developmental needs and cultural diversity

Cultural context in staff-child groupings

The role of family culture, lifestyle, religion, and child-rearing practices in programs

Family goals, traditions and culture in planning environments and curriculum

Effects of personal values/attitudes/ beliefs/biases on human interactions

Reflecting community diversity and cultures in the program

Working effectively with families from various cultural, linguistic and socioeconomic backgrounds
Research in techniques to infuse anti-bias awareness

Policy design supporting both a variety of beliefs and program philosophies

Design of policies and programming sensitive to family goals, traditions, lifestyles and cultures

Research on biases of assessment tools

Critical examination of personal values, attitudes, beliefs, and biases

Working with prejudice and bias in the program and community

Family structures in various cultures

Sharing culturally responsive child development information with families

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Families & Community Systems

Knowledge of the complex characteristics of the children’s families and communities. Establishing respectful relationship and communication with family and community members.

 

Key Concepts:

  • Understanding and valuing the importance and complex characteristics of families and communities are important.
  • Providers respond empathetically and knowledgeably to families’ feelings and concerns regarding child care, guidance, and their child’s development. Communication is in the home language whenever possible.
  • Good family relations are established by respecting, supporting, and empowering families. This can be done by expressing interest in their culture, concerns, and accomplishments, and by involving families in the program.
  • Relationships are developed with other disciplines and specialties in related fields.

Supporting Explanations:

Childhood care and education programs are an integral part of the community. Understanding and valuing the importance and complex characteristics of families and communities enables everyone to work together. Programs which benefit children and youth play a key role in working with families to ease school transitions and provide access to community resources and services.

A provider’s role may also be spokesperson, advocate and/or community leader for children, youth and their families. Developing and maintaining relationships with other disciplines and specialties in related fields can strengthen the services provided for the children, youth and families in the community.

Families & Community Systems Standards

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Awareness of characteristics of family and/or community systems Exploration of theories of family development and community systems Research on family development, family systems, and/or community systems
Identification of family stress factors, such as violence, substance abuse, economic insecurity, and mental health issues Exploration of strategies to support families in stress In-depth study of research and programs to support families in stress
Basic principles of partnerships with families and/or community systems Application of techniques to develop positive partnerships with families and/or community systems Critical examination, comparison, or development of practices that involve families in programs and/or community systems
Identification of ways to respect, support, and empower families Development of strategies to respect, support, and empower families Critical analysis of research and theories of family support and empowerment
Awareness of community resources to support families and/or childhood care and education programs Utilization and coordination of community resources to support families and/or childhood care and education programs Critical analysis or development of community systems to support families and/or childhood care and education program
Identification of opportunities to network with professionals from other programs that support children, youth and/or families Application of techniques to develop links with other programs, agencies and specialties to form community systems that support children, youth and/or families Critical examination, research, or evaluation of techniques to form community systems that support children, youth and/or families
Identification of opportunities to connect children, youth and/or families with community systems and resources Application of strategies to connect children, youth and/or families with community systems and resources Critical analysis of programs and initiatives to connect children, youth and/or families with community systems and resources

Families & Community Systems Sample Topics

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Principles of families and community systems

Identify systems and settings that make up a community

Childhood care and education from the family’s perspective

Families as primary care provider and educator

Family orientations, home visits, and conferences

Working with parents to ease school transitions

Effective communication skills with families and community partners

Ethics of confidentiality

Maintaining communication and connection with families

Services available to assist children/youth and families

Maintaining continuity between home and childhood programs

Involving families in the program respectfully

How families’ attitudes influence children’s ability and interest to learn

Stress factors affecting families

Community resources as a source for curriculum and/or program enrichment

Sense of community within and beyond the childhood care and education program

Impacts of substance abuse and/or domestic violence

Introduction to community and family support systems, such as criminal justice system, faith-based communities, foster care programs, mental health programs, adoption agencies, services for special needs
Examination of families and community systems

Effects of family and community factors on development and learning

Developing and maintaining relationships with other disciplines and specialties

Including families in program components

Incorporating family and resources into curriculum

Volunteerism in childhood care and education programs

Strategies to involve different families in different ways

Ethical commitments to families and communities

Discussions and decisions with family regarding children/youth, program, and philosophy

Sharing knowledge of child development with families

Variations in parenting styles

Using adult learning principles in family meetings and parent education groups

Assisting families in discovering resources and developing skills

Creating program evaluations for families and using results for program planning

Factors that impact families and their ability to nurture their children and youth

Evaluating family stressors and crises

Making referrals based upon family strengths

Establishing community and professional partnerships

Strategies to connect families to community support systems
Research in families and community systems

Interrelationships of systems that support children, youth and families

Role as spokesperson, advocate and community leader for children/youth and their families

Families as collaborating decision-makers

Innovative ideas and actions to promote communication

Public awareness activities

How family and community systems impact individual thought and child rearing beliefs and practices

Ethical dilemmas in relationships with families, community and society

Supporting families in various stages of parenting

In-depth examination of current theory and research on family relationships

Theories of family development and dynamics in pluralistic cultures

Study of strengths-based, family-centered early intervention approaches

Involving families in child assessments

Community resources and agencies as sources of research and information

Collaborating to improve programs and practices for children, youth and families

Research on effectiveness of community systems to support families

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Health, Safety & Nutrition

Knowledge of basic health, safety, and nutrition principles and practices. Knowledge of child abuse and neglect prevention, identification, reporting procedures, and therapeutic care. Promoting healthy choices and safety awareness with children and youth.

 

Key Concepts:

  • Keeping children, youth and staff safe and healthy requires the implementation of laws, practices and routines in all aspects of the program.
  • An understanding of nutrition supports positive growth and development of children and youth.
  • Advocating for policies and procedures that affect the nutritional welfare of the individuals in the program and in the broader community is an important role.
  • Recognizing signs and symptoms of abuse and neglect and domestic violence—and knowing the proper course of action to take in these situations—is required as a mandatory reporters.

Supporting Explanations:

The health and safety of community members, especially the children and youth, is a number one priority. Children and youth need a safe place to stay.

Knowledge of health and safety laws, practices, and routines (such as adequate supervision, routine care and maintenance of materials and equipment, and other risk management plans) contributes to a family’s sense of comfort and a child’s health and welfare.

A child’s nutrition strongly affects his/her physical, social, emotional and cognitive development.

Familiarity with the causes, results and treatments for abuse and neglect of children and youth, and domestic violence makes the reporting process easier for all parties involved.

Health, Safety & Nutrition Standards

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Identification of safe and healthy activities for children, youth, families, and/or professionals Development of safe and healthy activities for children, youth, families, and/or professionals Analysis and synthesis of research on practices and procedures to promote health and safety of children, youth, professionals, and/or families
Identification of safe and healthy physical and/or psychological environments for children, youth and adults and/or unsafe, unhealthy environmental factors Exploration and application of safe and healthy practices in daily lives and/or examination of the effects of unsafe, unhealthy practices Analysis, synthesis, and implications of research on safe and healthy environments and/or the effects of unsafe, unhealthy environments for children, youth and/or adults
Introduction to nutrition Exploration and application of sound nutritional and feeding practices and/or the effects of unhealthy nutritional and feeding practices Examination of nutrition research and its implications for childhood care and education practices for children, youth and/or families
Fundamentals of child abuse, and neglect, and required reporting procedures for mandated reporters Examination of the effects of child abuse and neglect and/or domestic violence on brain development, attachment, and behavior Critique of programs for the prevention and remediation of effects of child abuse, stress, neglect, trauma, substance abuse, and/or domestic violence
Definitions of domestic violence and/or substance abuse and awareness of programs for prevention and treatment Examination of the effects of domestic violence and/or substance abuse on the well-being of children, youth and adults Critique of programs for the prevention and treatment of effects of domestic violence and/or substance abuse
Identification of ways to balance work and play in daily lives Exploration and application of health and wellness activities Development of health and wellness policies and programs for children, youth and/or professionals


Health, Safety & Nutrition Sample Topics

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Principles of safety, health and nutrition

First Aid, CPR and Food Handlers training

Recognizing and reporting child abuse and neglect

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

Preparing staff and children/youth for drills and emergencies

Effects of child nutrition on development

Child safety and supervision

Procedures for sanitation such as hand washing, diapering, or preventing cross contamination

Laws, regulations, standards, practices, and/or routines that promote healthy, safe environments

Effects of environmental toxins on human development

Keeping health records and reporting hazards

Effects of drug abuse

Effects of domestic violence

Informing families of health, safety, and nutritional best practices

Burn-out, stress

Mental health

Mind body connection

Alternative health practices

Effects of “screen time” on health

School violence, bullying

Communicable diseases
Theories on safety, health, and nutrition

Compliance with state and national health and safety standards

Developing health, safety, and nutrition policies

Infectious disease control practices

Choosing healthy bodies/lifestyles/ environment curriculum

Menu evaluation regarding nutritional value and balance, cultural preferences, individual allergies, and special needs

Links between health, safety, and nutrition practices and children/youth’s development and individual needs

Health records, communication, and confidentiality

Health resources for families

Causes, results, and treatments for child abuse and neglect

Treatment programs for preventing and treating drug abuse in children, youth and/or families

Programs for children/youth affected by domestic violence

Burnout stress
Research in safety, health, and nutrition

Code of ethics as a monitoring tool for compliance with regulations

Design and implementation of curriculum promoting healthy bodies/ lifestyles/environment

Analyze policies to minimize staff and child illness and injury

Policies and procedures affecting health, safety, or nutritional welfare of the broader community

Meeting the health care needs of individual children/youth

Effective relationships with families regarding health issues

Policies and procedures for continuous monitoring and adjustments of health and safety practices

Affect of regulations on program quality

Designing and evaluating emergency preparedness plans

Developing programs and practices supportive of abused and neglected children and youth

Developing programs for prevention and treatment of drug abuse in children, youth and/or families

Developing programs and treatments for children/youth affected by domestic violence

Developing and implementing a reporting plan for child abuse and neglect

Developing and implementing programs for the prevention of bullying and/or school violence

 

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Human Growth & Development

Knowledge of social, emotional, cognitive, and physical growth and development. Using developmentally appropriate practices and principles in programs for children and youth.

Key Concepts:

  • Knowledge of human growth and development is based on major principles, theories, and research.
  • All areas of human growth and development are interrelated and are linked to how humans learn.
  • Humans grow and develop socially, emotionally, cognitively, and physically.
  • Children/youth’s healthy growth and development is influenced by environmental, biological, and social factors.

Supporting Explanations:

An understanding of human growth and development enables the professional to recognize typical and atypical behavior and development. This information also guides daily childhood care and education practices and influences work with individual children and youth.

When designing programs for children and youth, it is important to be knowledgeable of all developmental areas and optimal periods of development.


Human Growth & Development Standards

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Overview of major principles, theories, and/or research on growth, development and education of children, youth and/or adults Examination or application of major principles, theories, and research on growth, development and education of children, youth and/or adults Focused critical examination of, or comparison between, major principles, theories, and research on growth, development, and education of children, youth and/or adults or their implications
Discussion of how all areas of development are interrelated and are linked to how humans learn Examination or application of how all areas of development are interrelated and are linked to how humans learn Analysis or theoretical and practical study of how all areas of development are interrelated and are linked to how humans learn
Introduction to social, emotional, cognitive, and/or physical development Exploration or application of social, emotional, cognitive, intellectual, and/or physical development theories and principles to child care practices Focused critical examination of social, emotional, cognitive, intellectual, and/or physical development or their implications
Description of children/youth constructing their own understandings of the world around them through active learning Examination of how children/youth construct their own understandings of the world around them through active learning or application of practices supporting this concept Theoretical and practical study of how children/youth construct their own understandings of the world around them through active learning or the implications of this idea
Overview of how healthy development is influenced by environmental, biological, and social factors Examination of how healthy development is influenced by environmental, biological, and social factors or application of practices that support this concept Theoretical and practical study of how healthy development is influenced by environmental, biological and social factors or evaluation and implications of various practices
Fundamentals of Developmentally Appropriate Practice Application of the principles of Developmentally Appropriate Practice Critical examination of Developmentally Appropriate Practice and how it reflects current research


Human Growth & Development Sample Topics

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Principles and milestones of human growth and development: physical, social, emotional and/or cognitive

Domains and stages of development

Overview of research on temperaments

Links between development and learning

Practices that support all areas of growth and individual needs

NAEYC’s Developmentally Appropriate Practice guidelines

Individual differences in growth, development, and learning

Optimal periods of development

Importance of play and active learning in growth and development and/or school readiness

Effects of stress, separation, and transition on development

Developmental indicators of special needs

Basic principles of resiliency

Bonding and attachment

Brain development
Theories in human development and learning

Influences on growth and development

Typical and atypical behavior or development

Links between theories of human development and learning

Links between culture and learning and development

Individual and group programs based on human development and learning

Construction of knowledge through children/youth’s active learning and social interactions

How to implement NAEYC’s Developmentally Appropriate Practice guidelines in program activities

Examining the development of resiliency
Research in human development and learning

Interrelationships among theories, domains of development, culture, and learning

In-depth study of theories of human development and learning

Program design based upon theory and research in human development and learning

Affect of development and learning on individual capacities, temperament, and life experiences

Comparison of current research with current Developmentally Appropriate Practice guidelines and practices

Theories, implications and/or programs to support development of resiliency

 

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Learning Environments & Curriculum

Knowledge of the relationship between physical space, activities, experiences, and materials with child behavior, growth and development. Creating developmentally appropriate and culturally appropriate learning environments and curricula to foster optimum growth and development of children and youth.

Key Concepts:

  • It is important to know, understand, and use a wide variety of effective approaches, strategies, and tools to positively influence children’s and youth’s development and learning.
  • When planning learning experiences, it is important to consider: program philosophy and goals; family and community expectations; developmental stages, needs, interests, cultures, abilities; quality and content standards. Smooth, predictable routines and transitions, as well as a good balance in scheduled activities, are also important.
  • It is important to organize space that is predictable, appropriate, flexible, orderly, and aesthetic. It can encourage active involvement, initiative, responsibility, creativity, and a growing sense of autonomy.
  • All supplies, equipment, and materials reflect children’s and youth’s development, diversity of ability, culture, families, circumstances, and community. They also support all areas of learning and development.
  • Selection and use of materials are guided by individual learning styles, varying developmental levels, special needs, and the languages and cultures of the people in the group.

Supporting Explanations:

Curriculum is experience that allows learners to acquire, construct, and practice skills, concepts, creative expression, attitudes, and dispositions through interactions with others and through carefully selected materials and thoughtfully planned activities.

Learning environments include all of the relationships with people and all of the various interactions with materials in all of the settings in which people grow and learn. Children and youth vary in prior experiences, rates of development, learning styles, and interests. An environment that maximizes the potential for each person to acquire and construct knowledge, skills, and understandings includes a variety of opportunities.

As individuals grow and learn, the specific areas of content may become the focus of study. It is important to know, understand, and use a wide variety of effective approaches, strategies, and tools to positively influence children’s and youth’s development and learning. Children and youth need opportunities and support to understand, acquire, and use verbal, nonverbal, written, and spoken communication. Print- and conversation-rich environments help children and youth develop language skills, self-expression, vocabulary, and early literacy skills.


Learning Environments & Curriculum Standards

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Overview of major principles, theories, models and research on curriculum Examination or application of major principles, theories, models, and research on curriculum and curriculum development Comparison between major theories, models, and research on curriculum and curriculum development
Introduction to effective ways to integrate language, literacy, the arts, science and technology, mathematics, social sciences, health, physical education, and/or life skills Exploration or application of effective approaches, strategies, and tools integrating language, literacy, the arts, science and technology, mathematics, social sciences, health and physical education, and/or life skills Evaluation of effective approaches, strategies, and/or tools integrating language, literacy, the arts, science and technology, mathematics, social sciences, health and physical education, and life skills and the implications of each
Overview of major principles, theories, and research on learning environments Examination or application of major principles, theories, and research on learning environments Comparison between major theories, and research on learning environments and their implications
Introduction to environmental choices based on individual learning styles, varying development levels, special needs, and/or language and cultures of the people in the group Examination or application of environmental choices based on individual learning styles, varying development levels, special needs, and/or language and cultures of the people in the group Critical examination, comparison, or evaluation of environmental choices based on individual learning styles, varying development levels, special needs, and/or language and cultures of the people in the group
Description of routines and transitions that support development Exploring approaches, strategies, and tools to promote development and learning. Designing and evaluating learning experiences consistent with program philosophy
Identification of types of play Examination of theories of play In-depth study of research and theories of play
Discussion of Early Childhood Foundations as a basis for program development Application of Early Childhood Foundations to program development Content analysis and/or comparison of state early learning standards


Learning Environments & Curriculum Sample Topics

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Principles of curriculum components

Principles of learning environments

Promoting creative expression

How materials and equipment can support child development

Routines and transitions that support development

Promoting positive group participation skills

Outdoor activities for development and learning

Introduction to types of play

Introduction to literacy and language development and practices

Teacher as facilitator and play partner

Ways to modify curriculum to meet a child’s individual needs

Creative expression as necessary to the development of the whole child

Experiences, activities and interactions that allow children/youth to construct their own knowledge

The importance of each content area in children’s/youth’s learning

The importance of each developmental domain in children’s/youth’s learning

Making developmentally appropriate toys and games

Changing curriculum and environments to change behaviors

Arranging effective and appropriate learning centers

Selecting equipment and materials

Arranging equipment and space to promote development and learning

Program tours

Playing with blocks

House corner or dramatic play area

Table toys and manipulatives

Music and Movements

The mathematics curriculum

The science curriculum

The value of art activities

Planning, designing, and setting up learning centers

The basic ingredients of planning

Baby signs

Oregon’s Early Childhood Foundations
Curriculum theories and frameworks

Theories in learning environments

Reflection of program philosophy in curriculum and environment

Choosing approaches, strategies, and tools to promote development and learning

Intermediate study of literacy and language theory, research and practices

Developmentally and functionally appropriate individual activities, small group, and large group activities

Theories of play

Co-operative learning methodology and techniques

Developmentally effective approaches to teaching and learning

Curriculum content areas and concepts

Linking curriculum and environment to assessment results

Curriculum and environment reflecting children’s/youth’s needs and interests

Learning centers that promote growth in multiple subjects and developmental domains

The role of repetition and reflection in refining thinking and skills

Analysis and selection of commercial toys, games and software

Planning service-learning and leadership activities for school-aged children and youth

Comparing curricula and environments

Development of training sessions/ training curricula for adults

Productive environments for adult learning
Research in curriculum theory and learning environments

Designing and evaluating learning experiences consistent with program philosophy

Effects of environmental factors on development, diversity, temperament, stress, and sensory integration dysfunction

Evaluating books and materials for literacy, listening, and drawing

Advanced study of literacy and language theory, research, and practices

Advanced study of research and theories on play

Designing, implementing, and evaluating curriculum and environments for comprehensive development and learning opportunities

Researching, designing, implementing and evaluating group experiences for individual growth, group management, and co-operative learning activities

Changing curriculum and environments in response to assessment results

Major theories, research, and controversies related to content areas, curriculum models, and teaching methodologies

Strategies supporting child-directed curriculum planning

Researching claims of commercial toys, games and software

 

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Observation & Assessment

Knowledge of observation techniques, assessment tools, and documentation procedures for children and youth. Using observation and assessment to individualize learning experiences, improve the effectiveness of the learning environment, and support referrals for specialized services.

Key Concepts:

  • Observations and assessments can be used to learn to know each person as an individual.
  • There are many observation, record-keeping and assessment tools and procedures available.
  • Which tool is selected and used depends on who is being assessed and why the assessment is being conducted. It also depends on the compliance of the tool with established criteria and standards.
  • Observation and assessment procedures are used in a manner that promotes and demonstrates communication between colleagues, families, and specialists in planning, coordinating, implementing, and evaluating program support for children, youth and staff.

Supporting Explanations:

Observation and assessment aid in understanding and responding to children’s and youth’s personal, cultural and developmental needs. Observation and assessment also help to improve the effectiveness of environments and programs.

The right assessment methods, whether formal or informal, written or verbal, provide valid, reliable, accurate and helpful information regarding programs, curricula, environment, children, youth, and staff.

A collaborative approach in observation and assessment improves communication with stakeholders (parents, specialists, staff, etc.). Collaboration makes the assessment more effective and decisions regarding further referrals to specialists more responsive to everyone involved.


Observation & Assessment Standards

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Overview of basic techniques and methods for useful observation, assessment, and record keeping Exploration or application of techniques and methods of observation, assessment, and recordkeeping to the care and education setting Comparison and critique of various instruments and procedures used for observation, assessment, and record keeping
Overview of tools used for observation, assessment, and record-keeping Selection of instruments and tools that promote authentic, developmentally appropriate and culturally appropriate assessment Selection of instruments and tools that promote and demonstrate communication and collaboration among staff, families, and referral specialists
Techniques for sharing observations with families and specialists Development of communication systems for sharing observations and assessments with families, specialists, and community Development of systems for program accountability through authentic assessment and evaluation
Protection of confidentiality in the context of ethical conduct Responsible use of observation and assessment. Critique of national models of program evaluation and effectiveness research.
Discussion of use of observation and assessment for program planning Links between authentic observation and assessment, individualizing curriculum and developing programs Analysis of models for connecting observation and assessment to program outcomes


Observation & Assessment Sample Topics

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Principles of observation and assessment

Recording factual and descriptive observations

Observation procedures

Interpreting observations

Tools for observing, recording, and record-keeping

Sharing observations and records with professionals, families, and/or specialists

Protecting privacy in the observation and record-keeping process

Procedures and purposes of child assessment

Early Childhood Foundations Assessment

Ethical responsibilities for communicating and supporting families with assessment results
Strategies for observation and assessment

Appropriate and inappropriate use of assessment methods

Assessing programs, environment, curriculum, children, youth, and/or staff

Applying human development theory to observation

Program planning and curriculum implementation based on observations and assessments

Involving families in assessment and planning

Communicating and documenting assessment information

Selecting observation and assessment tools

Authentic assessment methods

Pairing authentic assessment and formal assessment

Culturally appropriate assessment tools and strategies
Research in observation and assessment

Assessment tools that respect diversity and ability

Evaluation of observation and assessment tools and techniques

Choosing and improving observation and assessment tools

In-depth interpretation of assessment information

Establishing documentation methods for assessment

Integrating assessment procedures throughout the program

Assessment follow-up

Research regarding developmental screening tests and assessments

Assessment tools as a method of communicating with colleagues, families and specialists

Critical analysis of assessment tools and strategies for developmental and/or cultural appropriateness

Analysis of the results of using the Early Childhood Foundations Assessment

 

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Personal, Professional & Leadership Development

Knowledge of childhood care and education as a profession with an identified body of knowledge, professional standards, professional ethics, and established systems. Participating in leadership, advocacy, personal growth, and professional development activities.

Key Concepts:

  • Professionals consider themselves as professionals and their work as a professional field of learning and practice.
  • Professionals pursue learning opportunities that help to fulfill a personal and professional development plan.
  • Professionals take advantage of opportunities to improve competence for personal and professional growth and for the benefit of the children, youth and families.
  • Professionals value reflection on teaching and learning and use a variety of reflective activities, such as staff interaction, training/education, and journals.
  • Professionals value the professional action of putting into practice new knowledge that is gained.
  • Professionals understand the history, issues, trends and philosophies of the childhood care and education profession and the career development system of Oregon that give validity to the field.
  • Professionals develop a philosophy, value-system, rationale, and organizational climate for their work.
  • Professionals participate in professional development activities, childhood professional organizations, mentoring, and advocacy.
  • Professionals have strong personal character traits and follow ethical standards.
  • Professionals follow applicable federal, state, and local standards, policies, regulations and laws.
  • Professionals use scientific research and resources relevant to childhood care and education, and the families and community related to their programs.

Supporting Explanations:

In order to provide high quality childhood care and education, those who care for children and youth must be professionals and be recognized as professionals.

People working in the field place high quality as a priority. Established standards for the profession define what is necessary to promote a high quality of care and education.


Personal, Professional & Leadership Development Standards

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Identification or discussion of factors in personal, professional and leadership development Exploration and application of professionalism and leadership Study of professionalism and leadership in the childhood care and education field from a comparative perspective
Overview of applicable federal, state, and local standards, policies, regulations, and laws Exploration and application of applicable federal, state, and local standards, policies, regulations, and laws Critical examination, comparison, or evaluation of applicable federal, state, and local standards, policies, regulations, and laws
Fundamentals of and supports for professional and/or leadership development Examination and application of professional and/or leadership development supports and strategies Analysis or evaluation of professional development and implications for the field
Overview of the history, issues, trends, and philosophies of the childhood care and education profession and the career development system of Oregon Examination of the history, issues, trends, and philosophies of the childhood care and education profession and the career development system of Oregon Theoretical and practical study of the history, issues, trends, and philosophies of the childhood care and education profession and the career development system of Oregon and their implications
Fundamentals of a professional code of ethics Application of professional code of ethics to professional practice in relationship to children, youth, families, colleagues, and community Critical analysis of code of ethics in relationship to best practice, current research, and professional trends
Identification of leadership roles and work in childhood care and education Exploration of qualities, values, methods, and skills in leadership Analysis of various educational theories and their relationship to concepts and practices of leadership
Introduction to effective training and mentoring strategies and techniques to support personal, professional and leadership development Exploration of effective training and mentoring strategies and techniques to support personal, professional and leadership development In-depth study and development of models for training and mentoring to support personal, professional and leadership development
Fundamentals of advocacy Examination and application of effective advocacy practices In-depth study and development of models for advocacy
Discussion of stress and burnout and their effects on personal, professional and/or leadership development Exploration of strategies to minimize the effects of stress and burnout Research and theory on stress and burnout as it relates to the field


Personal, Professional & Leadership Development Sample Topics

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Principles of personal, professional, and leadership development

Child care as a profession

Applying ideals and principals to serving children, youth, families, communities, and society

Legal and regulatory requirements for establishing safe, nurturing, inclusive, and enriching programs

Starting a professional development plan

Introduction to the Code of Ethics

How to be a self-directed learner

Introduction to the childhood care and education profession and Oregon’s career development system

Introduction to resources and professional organizations in childhood care and education

How to stay up-to-date in the field

Recognizing burnout and stress

Techniques of public speaking

Introduction to advocacy

What does research tell us?

Professional resources and /or organizations

Balance of work and play
Theories of personal, professional and leadership development

Organizational and community leadership

Reflective practices

Relationship between theory and practice

Introduction to collaborating with professional disciplines

Establishing a professional climate that fosters development, learning, and positive relations within the organization and community

Developing and implementing personnel practices that promote professional development for self and staff

Developing a professional development plan

Using the Code of Ethics to make professional decisions

Re-evaluating and updating a professional development plan

Intermediate study of the childhood care and education profession and Oregon’s Professional Development System

Choosing a childhood care and education philosophy that works for you

Factors contributing to quality in childhood care and education

How to read a scientific study

Putting scientific research into practice

Effective training, coaching, and mentoring strategies

Planning and implementing advocacy strategies


Research in personal, professional, and leadership development

Establishing a system for following standards, policies, regulations, and laws

Leadership and advocacy in the profession

How to be an effective board and committee member

How to work with the media

Evaluating and implementing staff training and development plans

Personal philosophy of childhood care and education based on knowledge of child development and best practices

Evaluation of current trends in childhood care and education

Program decision-making based on professional standards

How to conduct action research

Application of current educational research to planning and decision-making

Legislative and advocacy processes that impact children, youth and their families

Promoting an environment encouraging reflection and self-directed learning

Promoting a strong code of ethics in the program

Models of personal, professional and/or leadership development and promoting professional growth for others

Advanced study in the childhood care and education profession and professional development systems

Developing advocacy campaigns

 

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Program Management

Knowledge of accepted business practices, legal and regulatory requirements, financial obligations, and record keeping. Developing or implementing program policies, communication strategies, management plans, and sound financial practices.

Key Concepts:

  • The relationship between the program’s philosophy and daily practice, to the professional guidelines and mandates guiding the program is important.
  • Managing a program entails designing program policies that support the financial needs and the program’s goals.
  • Balance in a program necessitates meeting legal and regulatory requirements while advocating for children, youth, families, staff, and board.
  • Promoting the philosophy and the needs of the program and responding to the needs of the community provides balance in a program.
  • It is important to incorporate evaluation, planning, implementation, and management procedures into comprehensive programming and individual activities that match learner needs, diversity issues, and inclusion of children and youth with special needs. This includes acquisition, inventory, and evaluation of curriculum, equipment and materials, and other resources (financial, personnel, time).
  • It is important to provide strong leadership and visionary direction by planning for, recruiting, hiring, orienting, supporting, valuing, training, supervising, and evaluating the growth and development of staff and volunteers.
  • Program success depends on good public relations and marketing, and understanding how the program relates to the larger community.

Supporting Explanations:

Program management means knowing, understanding and affecting all components of the program. Building an effective program requires the ability to carefully observe, listen to, motivate and challenge key people, such as staff and volunteers.

Competent and committed program staff and volunteers receive acknowledgement and support.

Building partnerships with families, colleagues, and community agencies creates more awareness and access to resources available in community. Good will goes a long way in retaining enrollment and affecting morale of professionals and families.


Program Management Standards

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Fundamentals of accepted business practices Examination or application of accepted business practices Theoretical and practical study of accepted business practices and their implications
Identification of legal and regulatory requirements Examination or application of legal and regulatory requirements Theoretical and practical study of legal and regulatory requirements and their implications
Discussion of the importance of promoting the philosophy of the program Examination of the philosophy of the program and how to promote it Evaluation of the philosophy of the program.
Discussion of public relations, marketing and/or external communications Examination of how the program relates to the larger community through public relations, marketing and/or external communications Theoretical and practical study of public relations, marketing, and/or external communications
Discussion of positive internal communications and work climate Development of strategies to enhance internal communications and work climate Critical examination, comparison or evaluation of communication methods and/or systems
Overview of recruiting, hiring, orienting, supporting, valuing, training, supervising, and evaluating the growth and development of staff and volunteers Examination or application of recruiting, hiring, orienting, supporting, valuing, training, supervising, and evaluating the growth and development of staff and volunteers Critical examination, comparison or evaluation of accepted practices for recruiting, hiring, orienting, supporting, valuing, training, supervising, and evaluating the growth and development of staff and volunteers and their implications
Fundamentals of building partnerships with families, colleagues, and community agencies Exploration or application of practices to build partnerships with families, colleagues, and community agencies Critical examination, comparison or evaluation of accepted practices for building partnerships with families, colleagues, and community agencies and their implications


Program Management Sample Topics

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Principles of program planning, evaluation, personnel management, and financial management

Basic business practices

Roles and responsibilities (such as accountability, confidentiality, custody, child abuse and neglect, anti-discrimination laws, labor laws, contracts, liability, insurance, public health codes, tax codes, accounting practices)

How to be a leader and a team player

Communication and positive interactions among staff, families, professionals, and community members

Maintaining records and documentation

Tax responsibilities

Inventory and maintenance of equipment and materials

Basic advertising techniques

Introduction to computers and software programs

Insurance and liability

Identifying your leadership style

Budgets, fees and tuition

Interviews and contracts
Theories of program planning, development, and evaluation

Frameworks for management of personnel, finances, programs

Comparison of program philosophies and frameworks

Reflection of program philosophy in curriculum and environment

Review and implementation of laws and legal issues

Program quality indicators, evaluation, and best practices

Interrelationships between program philosophy, daily practice, professional guidelines, and mandates

Staff recruitment, hiring and retention

Effective communication among staff, families, and administrators

Staff and volunteer supervision and meetings

Professional development of staff

Programs and partnerships to make families feel welcome and participatory

How the program can respond to community needs

Budget-planning to maintain financial solvency, accounting principles, staffing costs

Links between program resources, children’s/youth’s and families’ needs, and program goals

Development and use of appropriate community resources and collaborations

Facility maintenance

Basic marketing and public relations techniques

Policies and procedures for conflict resolution

Establishing and maintaining positive work climates

Putting your leadership style to work
Research and policy on program planning, evaluation, personnel, and financial management

Critical review and application of research and best practices for program design

Strategic planning and goal setting

Comprehensive program design and implementation

Program philosophy and daily practices within the boundaries of professional guidelines and mandates

Program evaluation

Critical examination of laws and legal issues

Relationships between early childhood and school age programs

Constructive relationships with host agencies, funders, or sponsors

Relationships between program and community

Implications of staffing and enrollment patterns on program income and quality

Design and implementation of job descriptions, evaluations, and procedures

Personnel development programs

Hiring, supervision, and evaluation with vision

Public relations strategies

Strategies for leadership development

 

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Special Needs

Knowledge of disabilities and other special needs, related resources, and regulations/laws. Implementing an inclusive and sensitive practice with children and youth in partnership with families.

Key Concepts:

  • Children and youth are persons first regardless of abilities or disabilities.
  • Awareness of, knowledge about, and sensitivity to children and youth with special needs are key to providing high quality care and education for all.
  • Children and youth with special needs can be supported by making changes to the program, materials and environment.
  • It is important to develop daily activities in which all children and youth can participate.
  • Families need clear and understandable information about their child’s abilities and special needs.
  • Families need information about available resources and the child and family’s legal rights to services.

Supporting Explanations:

Children and youth with special needs develop within a broad range of human growth and development.

An understanding of special needs allows professionals to identify the resources and develop appropriate programming.

Developing an inclusive child care program provides for individualized, high quality care and education for all children and youth in the program.

Both parents and professionals have specialized knowledge about children and youth with special needs that must be shared.

Knowledge of available special needs resources assists in meeting the specific needs of children, youth and families.

Clear and understandable information about abilities, disabilities, services, and rights supports the professional, the parents, and the child.


Special Needs Standards

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Overview of special needs within the ages and stages of human growth and development Examination of the distinctions, similarities, and differences among the types of special needs In depth study of the underlying factors associated with the various types of special needs
Fundamentals of inclusive child care Taking the necessary steps to create an inclusive child care program Evaluating the effectiveness of different strategies in operating an inclusive child care program
Introduction to partnering with parents of children/youth with special needs Development of polices and procedures for communication and collaboration with parents of children/youth with special needs Evaluation of effectiveness of communication systems and opportunities for family involvement in providing services to children/youth with special needs
An introduction to the team approach to services for children/youth with special needs Understanding and implementing Individual Education Plans (IEP) and Individual Family Service Plans (IFSP) for children/youth with special needs Exploration of various educational theories underlying specialized services to children/youth with special needs
Basic principles of making adaptations to programs, materials, and environments Selecting specific program, material, and environmental adaptations Evaluation of effectiveness of program, material, and environmental adaptations for specific children/youth with special needs
Understanding laws and regulations regarding services to children/youth with special needs Examination of program policies and procedures for meeting the needs and rights of children/youth with special needs Intensive examination of and advocacy for children, youth and/or family’s legal right to services


Special Needs Sample Topics

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Developmental indicators of special needs

Purpose and implementation of Individual Education Plans (IEPs) and Individual Family Service Plans (IFSPs)

Implementing behavior support and management plans

Health, safety, and nutrition for children/youth with special needs

Risk of child abuse in special needs populations

Feeding issues for children/youth with special needs

Appropriate use of adaptive equipment

Exploring curricula and environments sensitive to special needs

A survey of intervention strategies

Collaboration with specialists to develop and implement special needs plans

Collaborating with families of children/youth with special needs

Working with talented and gifted children/youth

Program’s legal requirements and family’s legal rights

Sign language

All children/youth have special needs

Inclusive practices

Behavior as a special need

Mental illness as a special need

Americans with Disabilities Act and requirements
Theories of special needs and inclusion

Potential impacts on families who have a child with special needs

Implementation of behavior support and management plans

Inclusion of all children/youht into group activities

Developing IEPs/IFSPs using strength-based, family-centered approaches

Environmental and program adaptations to support children/youth with special needs

Linking human service knowledge and strategies to intervention strategies

Planning curricula to meet IEP objectives and IFSP outcomes

Planning curricula to meet needs of talented and gifted children/youth

Referrals and follow-up using a family-centered approach

Knowledge and implementation of laws for early intervention, early special education, and special education

Planning inclusive programs
Research in special needs and inclusion

Implementation of appropriate health appraisal procedures

Designing behavior support and management plans

Americans with Disabilities Act compliance and staff training

Developing alternative and augmentative communication systems

Developing plans to meet health care needs

Working with family members who have special needs

Designing, implementing, and evaluating curricula and environment for inclusion

Advocacy for children’s/youth’s and families’ rights for services

 

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Understanding & Guiding Behavior

Knowledge of developmentally appropriate and culturally appropriate guidance theories, principles and practices. Providing positive guidance to foster self-esteem, self-regulation, constructive behavior, and positive relationships for children and youth.

Key Concepts:

  • Knowledge about understanding and guiding behavior is based upon current principles, theories, and research.
  • Understanding developmentally appropriate guidance and discipline strategies come from knowledge of both human development and positive relationships.
  • It is important to understand behavior in the context of personal factors, such as developmental stages, individual temperaments, and learning styles.
  • It is important to understand behavior in the context of environmental and social factors, such as families, cultures, and other external influences.
  • Cooperative strategies of guidance are based upon practices that foster self-esteem, self-regulation, and constructive behavior.

Supporting Explanations:

An understanding of how children and youth develop and knowledge of guidance and discipline theories will lead to strategies that foster self-esteem, self-regulation, constructive behavior, and positive relationships.

A positive regard for children and youth by nurturing adults, in an environment of mutual respect, promotes healthy learning and development. Pro-social behavior can be learned through modeling of appropriate behaviors by others.

When designing programs that support pro-social behavior, it is important to be knowledgeable of both developmental and environmental-social factors, such as diverse values, cultural influences, individual needs, abilities, and learning styles. The end result will be developmentally and culturally appropriate guidance and discipline.


Understanding & Guiding Behavior Standards

Set One Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Standards
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Overview of major principles in understanding and guiding behavior Examination or application of major principles and theories in understanding and guiding behavior Focused critical examination and comparison between major theories and research on understanding and guiding behavior
Discussion of how developmentally appropriate guidance and discipline strategies come from knowledge of development and relationships Examination or application of various guidance and discipline strategies to promotion of healthy development and relationships Analysis and practical research in developmentally appropriate guidance and discipline strategies
Introduction of theory on guidance and behavior Exploration or application of theory and research on guidance and behavior Focused critical examination of theory and research on guidance and behavior
Description of behavior in context of personal factors, such as developmental stages, temperaments, and/or learning styles Examination of behavior in context of personal factors, such as developmental stages, temperaments, and/or learning styles Theoretical and practical research on behavior in context of personal factors, such as developmental stages, temperament
Description of behavior in context of environmental factors, such as families, cultures, and/or other external influences Examination of behavior in the context of environmental factors, such as families, cultures, and/or other external influences Theoretical and practical research on behavior in context of environmental factors, such as families, cultures, and/or other external influences


Understanding & Guiding Behavior Sample Topics

Set One Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7
Set Two Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9
Set Three Sample Topics
for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10
Principles of guiding behavior

Appropriate guidance techniques based on human development

Developing guidance strategies with families

Facilitating the development of self-control and empathy in children

Facilitating trust, security, and independence in children

Cooperative strategies of guidance

Modeling and promoting positive, warm, nurturing relationships

Reflecting respect for self and others

Supporting children/youth in the process of maturation

Appropriate adult supervision

Natural consequences

Behavior in the context of temperaments

Self regulation

Brain development and self regulation

Behavior and environment
Theories in guiding behavior

Cooperative strategies that demonstrate realistic expectations

Relationship between trust, security and independence

Interactions among guidance, human development, and positive relationships

Theories of child development applied to individual and group management techniques

Instruction and guidance that address individual differences

Development of individual guidance plan

Supportive climates that encourage open communication

Individual behavior problems related to stress

Responding to different temperaments
Research in guiding behavior

In-depth study of interactions between guidance, human development, and positive relationships

In-depth study of interactions among guidance, learning environment, and curriculum

Guidance programs that respect diversity

Development of individual and group guidance policies

Analysis of cooperative strategies of guidance

Intervention and conflict resolution in children’s playing and learning

Strategies for positive adult-child and child-child communication

Research in individual guidance and group management techniques

 

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Glossary

Core Body of Knowledge
The basis for the training and education essential for on-going professional development in the childhood care and education profession; a foundation for both the Oregon Registry and the Oregon Registry Trainer Program

Core Knowledge Category (CKC)
Ten specific core knowledge categories make up the Core Body of Knowledge for Oregon's Childhood Care and Education Profession: Diversity; Families & Community Systems; Health, Safety & Nutrition; Human Growth & Development; Learning Environments & Curriculum; Observation & Assessment; Personal, Professional & Leadership Development; Program Management; Special Needs; and Understanding & Guiding Behavior

Key Concepts
The big ideas in each core knowledge category

Sample Topics
Examples of topics a professional may look for in training sessions, or topics a trainer may use to plan training sessions, workshops, seminars, and other professional development activities that would meet the requirements for core knowledge in the Oregon Registry

Set One, Set Two, and Set Three
A progression of increased depth and breadth of knowledge within each core knowledge category. Each set provides increased knowledge on how to place that knowledge into practice in professional work. The three sets of knowledge are Set One (Introductory Knowledge) for Oregon Registry Steps 1-7, Set Two (Intermediate Knowledge) for Oregon Registry Steps 7.5-9, and Set Three (Advanced Knowledge) for Oregon Registry Steps 9.5-10.

Standards
What the professional is learning within each core knowledge category and within each set of knowledge

Steps
The sequence from Enrollment through Step 12 in the Oregon Registry. Each step represents increased training and education in the Core Body of Knowledge

Supporting Explanation
An explanation of how the key concepts in each core knowledge category relate to best practices and to the everyday work with children, youth and families

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Appendix A: THE PROFESSION

The Profession

The profession of Childhood Care and Education is:

  • A vital industry with jobs, productive workers, a tax base, and purchases of goods and services.
  • A critical workforce allowing many families to work or to gain education necessary to work.

The profession of Childhood Care and Education includes all types of care and education for young children, and before/after school, and summer care programs for school age children and youth. Work in the profession involves care, nurturance, education, relationships, environments, and experiences.

Children and youth are the foundation for the future. Infants become toddlers, toddlers become preschoolers, preschoolers become youth, youth become young adults, and young adults become adults. Children become elementary, high school, and college students, citizens, the core of society, and the future workforce.

Children and youth benefit from high quality experiences, relationships, and environments provided by highly trained and educated professionals.

The Professional

The Childhood Care and Education professional possesses personal attributes appropriate for working with children, youth and families, achieves training and education in an identified core body of knowledge, translates knowledge into practice, accumulates experience in the field, has a strong commitment to professional ethics, and follows professional practices.

Childhood Care and Education professionals are individuals working in many settings and positions within the profession. Childhood Care and Education professionals also use core skills and knowledge in positions within other professions working with children, youth, and families.

Childhood Care and Education professionals work in a variety of settings: family child care homes, child care centers, for profit or corporate programs, not-for-profit or faith-based programs, early intervention or special education programs, Head Start or preschool programs, kindergarten through 3rd grade classes, teen parent or relief nursery programs, and before/after school or summer programs for youth. Individuals may work as family child care providers, child care center staff, teachers, aides, assistants, program staff, coordinators, and specialists.

Childhood Care and Education professionals work in support programs such as: resource and referral agencies, state agencies, independent consulting businesses, professional organizations, and higher education programs. Individuals may provide services for professionals as instructor, trainer, mentor, certification specialist, registration specialist, administrator, director, program support staff, and program management staff.

Professional Development

Professional development is training and education combined with quality professional experience that leads to increased knowledge and quality practice.

Professional development can include many venues and may follow either a college course credit and community-based training path, or a degree and certificate path. Opportunities for professional development may include: individual college credit classes at a community college, university, or private college; community based training sessions; distance learning opportunities; professional organization conferences; state certification or credential programs, and national credential programs.

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Appendix B: THE SYSTEM

The Infrastructure

The State of Oregon, Employment Department, Child Care Division has developed an infrastructure to achieve four core outcomes in child care:

  • Safety – children and youth are safe and healthy while in care
  • Accessibility - parents can find the child care they need when they need it
  • Affordability - parents spend less than 10% of household income on child care
  • Quality - child care prepares children and youth to succeed in school and life

These core outcomes are joined together and supported by state level policy. Long term planning for each of these core outcomes has strategies for accomplishment and sustainable programs, some of which are funded and some of which exist as known gaps in service. Each of these core outcomes also has indicators of achievement.

One of the strategies in the State of Oregon’s plan and infrastructure to achieve quality is the development and operation of a Professional Development System.

Professional Development System

The Oregon Professional Development System is a framework that weaves the profession together.

A Professional Development System includes:

  • Core body of professional knowledge
  • Professional development pathways leading to achievement of that knowledge
  • Professional standards and qualifications
  • Professional certifications and credentials
  • Trainer and training approval and evaluation systems
  • Professional, personal, and leadership development opportunities
  • Multiple delivery methods for professional development
  • Access to and outreach for professional development opportunities
  • Mentoring, coaching, advising, and peer support
  • Quality practices
  • Research and evaluation
  • Public engagement efforts and initiatives
  • Funding for professional development
  • Scholarships
  • Compensation and retention initiatives
  • Quality rewards and reimbursements

 

The National Picture

Oregon is connected to the two primary resources for the development and implementation of state professional development systems.

The National Child Care Information Center (NCCIC), a service of the Child Care Bureau, provides professional development system information and resources, development of a national core knowledge crosswalk, and links to other federal initiatives.

The National Registry Alliance (NRA) is a professional organization of administrators of state professional development systems. The National Registry Alliance provides information and support for state professional development systems, national leadership, and the opportunity for connection to and collaboration with other states.

The Oregon Center for Career Development in Childhood Care and Education

The Oregon Center for Career Development in Childhood Care and Education (OCCD) works as part of the state infrastructure to set professional standards, develop systems for professional development, and provide support through professional development programs and services.

In carrying out its work, OCCD values national leadership and research, follows the state plan and infrastructure, and within that infrastructure acts as a coordinating agency in collaboration with partners. In developing programs, OCCD assures stakeholder input and feedback, uses pilot programs and field tests, implements proven practices, and conducts annual reviews.

Programs and Supports for Professionals

There are many programs operated by agencies within the state infrastructure, which support quality. Some of the programs and supports that are connected to professional development include:

Oregon Registry: Pathways to Professional Recognition in Childhood Care and Education
Oregon Registry Trainer Program
Oregon Statewide Scholarship Program
Oregon Child Care Resource and Referral Network and Programs (OCCRRN)
Oregon Statewide Mentoring Program
Oregon Statewide Training Initiatives
Oregon AfterSchool for Kids (OregonASK)
Oregon Inclusive Child Care Program
Oregon Professional Organizations and Conferences
Oregon Child Care Training Calendar
Oregon Child Care Quality Indicators

Benefits and Results

The benefit and result of a state professional development system and a variety of programs and supports for professionals is a well trained and educated workforce in the field of childhood care and education.

A quality workforce results in high quality programs and services for children, youth, and families.

High quality programs and services for children, youth and families result in the positive growth and development of children and youth and a stronger social, educational and economic future.

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Appendix C: THE PROCESS

Development of the Core Body of Knowledge for Oregon's Childhood Care and Education Profession

This document is a result of many hours of team effort and in-depth research.

The Professional Development Registry Work Group and the Trainer Standards Work Group of the Training and Quality Committee of the State Childhood Care and Education Coordinating Council developed the core knowledge categories and the professional steps. The subsequent Implementation Work Group reviewed a model for the standards and sets for each level professional development step and each core knowledge category.

The Core Body of Knowledge was developed after studying childhood care and education professional core knowledge and standards from many other states such as Iowa, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Kentucky, Hawaii, Colorado, Missouri and Kansas. Other documents that contributed to the Core Body of Knowledge were: NAEYC criteria for program accreditation, Oregon Early Childhood Foundations learning standards, Oregon K-12 Content and Benchmark Standards, Rating Scales, and Bloom’s Taxonomy for educational objectives.

The Core Body of Knowledge was reviewed and minor revisions were made in Fall of 2007 with guidance from Oregon Registry Trainers, Oregon Registry Review Teams, mentors, Professional Development Standards Subcommittee, Sponsoring Organizations, resource & referral program staff and other state and local partners.

The Importance of the Core Body of Knowledge

The Core Body of Knowledge is a cornerstone of Oregon’s Professional Development System.

  • The Core Body of Knowledge provides a foundation for the Oregon Registry and the Oregon Registry Trainer Program.
  • The Core Body of Knowledge outlines what a childhood care and education professional is learning within each core knowledge category and within each set of knowledge.
  • The Core Body of Knowledge provides guidance for best practices in order to provide high quality care and education for children and youth.
  • The Core Body of Knowledge provides guidance for the content and depth of professional development activities provided to those professionals who work with children and youth.

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