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A Pigeon & A Boy
Act 3 - Mainstage

A Day in the Life: I Shall Not Hate

Burying Man's Best Friend

Arabic Language Camp

Understanding Muslim Admirers of Japan's Shinto Emperor

The Sacred State in Turkish Political History

Empire State of Mind: Race, Music & Democracy Promotion 

Lunch & Learn: After the Image

A Day in the Life: Istanbul: Memories & the City

Lunch & Learn: Remaking 'Half the World'

Undergraduate Student Conference

The Arab Spring and Syria: Why Has it Gone So Wrong?

Poetry, Pomegranates, & Patriarchs


A Day in the Life: Daughter of Damascus

Fellowship & Scholarship Information Session

The Tomb Chapel of Menna

Do (Muslim) Girls Really Need Saving?

A Pigeon & A Boy
Act 2 - Footnotes

A Day in the Life: Lipstick Jihad

Lunch & Learn: After the Arab Spring

Teaching Arab Culture through Literature & Film

A Pigeon & A Boy
Act 2 - Footnotes

Lunch & Learn: Passing Through Istanbul


 




Download the Middle East Studies Center's Winter 2014 Calendar of Events
Click on past events to access summaries, audio podcasts, pictures, resources & more!

A Day in the Life: A is for Arab Exhibition

A Day in the Life: Reel Bad Arabs Film Screening

Re-Excavating Ancient Egypt

A Day in the Life: Girls of the Factory

A Day in the Life: Wordstock Festival 2013

A Day in the Life: Memory, Authenticity & the Genre of Memoir

Teaching Arab Culture through Literature & Film

Islamic Art: Mirror of the Islamic World 

Office of International Affairs Open House

Reflections on the Conflict in Syria

A Pigeon and A Boy
Act 1 - Chapter 1

 Ahmed Maher 

Fellowship & Scholarship Information Session

The Millionaire & the Mummies

A Day in the Life: The Language of Baklava

Prince Among Slaves 


 

Download the Middle East Studies Center's Fall 2013 Calendar of Events

Panel on Turkish Protestshttp://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

America in an Arab Mirror http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Author Discussion: Come with Me from Jerusalem

16th Annual World Beat Festival

Summer Institute: The Arab Uprisings

Understanding the Arab Uprisings

From the Revolution to the Grind: Music & Politics in the Arab Uprisings 

Forgotten Fortress: Excavating Egypt’s Ancient Empire

14th Annual Iranian Festival

Art: The Middle East & Islamic World


 

In the Realm of the Ancient Egyptian God Montu: Temples & Rituals

The Ideal Warrior in the Persian Book of Kings  http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Lunch & Learn: Iran: Modern & Medieval  http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Israel in Motion: An Evening of Contemporary Israeli Dance

Iranian Women: From Ancient to Modern Times

Minorities & the Arab Revolutions  http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Minorities of the Modern Middle East Workshop

Women, War & Human Rights: Lessons from Afghanistan, Iraq & Palestine http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Seth: Ancient Egypt’s Evil God of Power & Might

Film Screening: Caramel

Landscapes of the Late Byzantine Village & Monastery

Iranian Women: From Ancient to Modern Times

About In an Antique Land   http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

 

Download the Middle East Studies Center's Spring 2013 Calendar of Events

Middle East Education Abroad & FLAS Information Session

Art & Nonviolent Resistance in Syria http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Celebrating Muslim Journeys at PSU: A Collection of Resources about the Muslim World

FLAS Information Session: Submitting a Strong Application

Beyond Zionism: A New Paradigm for Peace in Palestine http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Women Writers of Iran: Past & Present  http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Electoral Politics in Tunisia: A Panel Discussion http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

'Hasht Bihisht': the Garden of the Eight Paradises - the place of the garden in early Mughal culture http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

The Arab Spring & Women's Political Rights http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Undergraduate Student Conference on the Middle East

Film Screening: Marína of the Zabbaleen

Film Screening: Garbage Dreams

Download the Middle East Studies Center's Winter 2013 Calendar of Events.

 

Tutankhamun’s Last Secret http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Lunch & Learn:
Gulf Cities: Sidewalk Stories: Informal Urbanism in Dubai
http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Gulf Cities: From Pearls to FIFA: Architecture & Urbanism in Qatar http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Sport in the Middle East: A Workshop for Educators on Global Education through Film

Film Screening: Offside (Iran, 2006)

Faces of Love: Ahava, Agape, Ishq

Film Screening: Forerunners (Israel, 2004)

Middle East Education Abroad & FLAS Information Session

Lunch & Learn:
Arab Israeli Conflict & Cooperation: The Question of Water
http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Film Screening: Words of Witness

Memoirs of a Mujaheed & Thoughts on Algeria Today, a Panel Discussion

Conventional Wisdoms of the Arab Spring: Algerian and Tunisian Exceptionalism?http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Lunch & Learn:
(Post-)Revolution Tunisia
http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Ancient Egypt: The Greatest Discoveries You Have Probably Never Heard Of

Download the Middle East Studies Center's Fall 2012 Calendar of Events

 


 

Maharajan Arab Festival

Saturday, September 22 from 11 am - 4 pm | Portland Community College-Sylvania Campus

Arab American Cultural Center of Oregon (AACCO) is pleased to announce this year's Mahrajan – the largest celebration of Arab heritage and culture in the state – to be held in the lobby and outdoor courtyard of the PCC Sylvania Performing Arts Center. Delicious Arab cuisine from Aladdin’s Cafe and Taste of Lebanon, Arabic coffee, tea and refreshments from Sesame Donuts, an Arab souq (bazaar), arts and crafts for children, henna painting, cooking demonstrations, music from Ali Bourji and Company, dancing, a fashion show of Arab attire from throughout the Middle East, an art show, and a raffle for prizes…the list goes on and on!


Dean Obeidallah for Vice President Comedy Tour: Comedy for the 99.3%

Saturday, September 8 | 8 pm Mission Theater, 1624 NW Glisan

This show is a mix of politics, pop culture, and Middle Eastern themed comedy and features world renowned comedian Dean Obeidallah.  Dean is a co-founder of the New York Arab-American Comedy Festival and participant of Comedy Central's Axis of Evil Comedy Tour, a winner of countless awards, and is a contributor and guest on prime time and local television and radio including NPR, Dateline NBC, etc. He is also featured in the acclaimed PBS television documentary Stand Up: Muslim American Comics Come of Age. His opinion editorials, political and electoral commentaries, and satires frequent the HuffingtonPost, CNN, and elsewhere. The show also features Arab-American comedian 'Khaled the Comic,' and Iranian-American comedian and actress Melissa Shoshani

Co-sponsored by the University of Oregon Arab Student Union.


Lunch & Learn: A Checkpoint Effect? Evidence from a Natural Experiment on Travel Restrictions in the West Bank http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Wednesday, August 22 | 12 pm Smith Memorial Student Union, room 296, 1825 SW Broadway

Middle East Studies Center Lunch & Learn: A Checkpoint Effect? Evidence from a Natural Experiment on Travel Restrictions in the West Bank

Checkpoints are a centerpiece of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, yet remain understudied. How do they affect Palestinian preferences towards violence? What role do they play in the Peace Process and regional security? Some analysts contend that checkpoints defend against violence, while others say they perpetuate it. Which is it, and how can we tell? In this paper we exploit a natural experiment, based on an Israeli decision in 2009 to remove several checkpoints. We randomly sampled within two population clusters (n=599) before and after this intervention. These results are then compared with an independent panel survey (n=1200) conducted in three waves between 2007-2009. Both studies suggest that checkpoints make Palestinians more likely to support violence - suggesting a rethinking of Israeli security policy, as short-term concerns over Palestinian movement may be compromising Israel’s long-terms security interests. This argument has policy implications for conflicts worldwide, most notably in contemporary US-occupied Iraq.

Daphna Canetti (Ph.D., University of Haifa) is an associate professor with tenure at the School of Political Science. She is a political psychologist who specializes in the psychology of intergroup relations amidst protracted conflicts. She uses controlled randomized field experiments, spatial analysis, and experimental surveys to her bio-political research of immunity and inflammation resulting from war and terrorism exposure. With $2.25M recently granted by the US Institutes of Health, and grants by the Israel Science Foundation and United States - Israel Binational Science Foundation, and Yale's McMillan Center and Yale's Institution for Social and Policy Studies, the START project, she studies the effects of existential threat on intergroup conflict, and on war and peace attitudes. Her articles were published in journals such as Political Behavior, Political Psychology, Psychiatry - Interpersonal and Biological Processes, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Political Studies, Political Research Quarterly, Armed Forces & Society, Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Electoral Studies, and the Journal of Peace Research. She has been serving on the editorial board of Democracy and Security and Political Psychology. Her papers won numerous prizes such as the Roberta Sigel Award for the best paper presented at the International Society for Political Psychology. She was a Fulbright Fellow, the Helen Kellogg Institute for International Studies Visiting Fellow, and the Rice Family Foundation Visiting Professor at the Council on Middle East Studies, the MacMillan Center and the Department of Political Science, Yale University.

View Dr. Canetti's powerpoint presentation.


What Maritime Archeology Reveals about Ancient Egypthttp://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Thursday, August 9 | 7:30pm Smith Memorial Student Union, room 294, 1825 SW Broadway

Middle East Studies Center lecture series: What Maritime Archeology Reveals about Ancient Egypt

Pearce Paul Creasman is Assistant Research Professor of Dendrochronology at the University of Arizona, Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research

Dr Pearce Paul Creasman holds a number of positions with the University of Arizona:  Director of the University’s Egyptian Expedition; Assistant Research Professor of Dendrochronology; Curator of the Laboratory of the University’s Tree Ring Research collection; and assistant editor of the publication Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections.  He is also president and founder of the Institute for Maritime Research and Discovery. He currently serves as President of ARCE/Arizona Chapter. He obtained his Ph.D. in Nautical Archeology/Anthropology at Texas A&M University. He has an avid interest in underwater exploration and is a leading researcher on the timber of ships and shipwrecks in an effort to better understand the relationship between the ancient Egyptian people and their culture/environment.

Presented by the Oregon Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt, a private, nonprofit organization that supports research on all aspects of Egyptian history and culture, fosters broader knowledge among the general public, and strengthens American-Egyptian cultural ties.


13th Annual Iranian Festival

Saturday, August 4 | 10:00am South Park Blocks, Portland State University

13th Annual Iranian Festival

Come to enjoy: Iranian food and desert – Wine and beer – Iranian ethnic costumes, live music, dance performance and dance lessons, arts and carpet – Local business vendors, and non-profit exhibits – Children’s activities – Games and more


Beaverton International Celebration 2012

Saturday, July 28 | 11 am Howard M Terpening (HMT) Recreation Complex, 158th & Walker Road, Beaverton 

Beaverton International Celebration 2012

Beaverton's 2nd annual International Celebration hosted by Tualatin Hills Park & Recreation District's (THPRD) Party in the Park and the City of Beaverton. 

Visit the Middle East Cultural Tent hosted by the Portland State University Middle East Studies Center and the Arab American Cultural Center of Oregon


Kan ya Ma Kan, Beyrouth
(Once Upon a Time, Beirut, 1995, Lebanon)

Saturday, July 21, 9 pm | PSU Park Blocks

Middle East Studies Center film series: Kan ya Ma Kan, Beyrouth (Once Upon a Time, Beirut, 1995, Lebanon)

Distraught over their city’s recent destruction during the Lebanese Civil War, Yasmine and Leila embark on a journey in search of Beirut’s past glory. They carry with them two rare, unreleased film prints which help them land a meeting with the reclusive and eccentric film connoisseur, Monsieur Farouk.

Through the magic of cinema, the three travel back in time on a mythical, history-laden tour of the city. Here, Once Upon a Time: Beirut shines as the travelers visit the Beirut of the French-directed films of the 1930s. Next they explore the Beirut of the 1960s as seen through the sense of Arab filmmakers and finally they visit the Beirut of the large-scale American studio efforts of the 1970s.


London 2012: The French Revival of the Modern Olympics and the British Display of the Elgin Marbles... Are Greek Temples Religion or Loot?http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Saturday, July 21, 2012 | 1 pm Cramer Hall, room 250, 1721 SW Broadway

The Modern Olympic Games are without question the most popular and arguably the most successful cooperative international endeavor in the modern world. Revived in Athens in 1896 and returned there in 2004, the history of the rich traditions that led to the Olympic revival have already been forgotten in the century since their re-inauguration. Yet this history is vital to understanding what the Modern Olympics were originally designed to be. The ancient Games held quadrennially in Olympia were profoundly religious for the ancient Hellenes who invented them. The sanctuary and the Games were shut down by order of the Roman emperor Theodosius in 393 CE, once again for clear religious reasons. Amazingly, the revival of the Olympics in 1896 was also religious, and an examination of how this revival was justified in the popular mind can tell us a great deal about how both religion and Hellenism were being re-conceived in the later 19th century.

This lecture was presented by Dr. Louis A Ruprecht, Jr., William M. Suttles Chair in Religious Studies at Georgia State University. Professor Ruprecht is also a permanent Research Fellow at the Vatican Library and Secret Archives, where he spent eight years researching a book on the creation of the Vatican’s First "Profane Museum" in 1761. He is also a staff writer for Religion Dispatches, and blogs for the Huffington Post.

Co-sponsored by the Portland State University Hellenic Studies Program and the Middle East Studies Center


Summer Institute: Global Education Through Filmhttp://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Friday, July 20 - Sunday, July 22  Portland State University

Summer Institute: Global Education Through Film

International films transport an audience to new lands and provide viewers with unique insight into other cultures. Through this three day workshop, teachers increased their understanding of film as an education tool to inspire interdisciplinary learning about world history and cultures, current events, and other global concepts.

Presented with cosponsorship from the Portland State University Institute for Asian Studies, University of Oregon Center for Asian and Pacific Studies, and the Oregon Council for Social Studies


Bacheha-Ye Aseman (Children of Heaven, Iran, 1997)

Thursday, July 19 | 7:30pm 5th Avenue Cinema, 510 SW Hall Street

Middle East Studies Center film series: Bacheha-Ye Aseman (Children of Heaven, Iran, 1997)

When Ali loses his sister Zahra's school shoes, this young pair dream up a plan to stay out of trouble: they'll share his shoes and keep it a secret from their parents! But if they're going to successfully cover their tracks, Ali and Zahra must carefully watch their step on what rapidly turns into a funny and heartwarming adventure!

The screening featured a Q&A with Professor Masoud Kheirebadi following the film

In Persian with English subtitles


Shakespeare Iraq: An evening with the American University of Iraq-Sulaimani Shakespeare Company

Monday, July 9 | 7:30pm Artists Repertory Theatre, Morrison Stage, 1515 SW Morrison, Portland

Shakespeare Iraq: An evening with the American University of Iraq-Sulaimani Shakespeare Company

Join us for a brief presentation followed by a Q&A with this daring troupe of student Shakespeareans from Iraq.

Shakespeare Iraq is a group of students from the American University of Iraq, Sulaimani. They are a mix of North and South, Sunni and Shia, Arab and Kurd - representing extremely different communities in an astoundingly diverse nation.

Co-sponsored by the Portland State University Middle East Studies Center and the Portland Shakespeare Project with additional support from the Artists Repertory Theatre and the Oregon Shakespeare Festival

 


Download the Middle East Studies Center's Spring 2012 Calendar of Events

 

The Making of a Minority: Christians in Palestine

Wednesday, May 23 | 7 pm Smith Memorial Student Union, room 333, 1825 SW Broadway

Laura Robson (Ph.D. 2009, Yale University) is Assistant Professor of History at Portland State University. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and fellowships.

Dr Robson’s book, Colonialism and Christianity in Mandate Palestine (University of Texas Press, 2011) draws on a rich base of British archival materials, Arabic periodicals, and secondary sources and brings to light the ways in which the British colonial state in Palestine exacerbated sectarianism. By transforming Muslim, Christian, and Jewish religious identities into legal categories, Laura Robson argues, the British ultimately marginalized Christian communities in Palestine. Robson explores the turning points that developed as a result of such policies, many of which led to permanent changes in the region’s political landscapes. Cases include the British refusal to support Arab Christian leadership within Greek-controlled Orthodox churches, attempts to avert involvement from French or Vatican-related groups by sidelining Latin and Eastern Rite Catholics, and interfering with Arab Christians’ efforts to cooperate with Muslims in objecting to Zionist expansion. Challenging the widespread but mistaken notion that violent sectarianism was endemic to Palestine, Colonialism and Christianity in Mandate Palestine shows that it was intentionally stoked in the wake of British rule beginning in 1917, with catastrophic effects well into the twenty-first century.

Co-sponsored by the Portland State University Department of History, the Middle East Studies Center, and Friends of History


Devotional Selves: On Art & Identity in Byzantium

Friday, May 18 | 10 am Art Building, room 200, 2000 SW Fifth Avenue

Picture of Devotional Selves: On Art & Identity in Byzantium

Ivan Drpic (Ph.D., Harvard University) is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Washington

Dr Drpic’s areas of research and teaching interest include the art, architecture, and material culture of the medieval Mediterranean and Europe, with an emphasis on Byzantium; the nexus of aesthetics, anthropology, and religion; theories of the image; and the intersection of the verbal and the visual. In his current book project, Drpic explores the relationship between art and epigrammatic poetry in the last centuries of Byzantium, taking as his focus the realm of personal piety and its artistic arsenal. The project is grounded in a close examination of the corpus of Byzantine epigrams, or verse inscriptions, on art objects produced from around 1100 to around 1450. Drpic uses this rich and largely neglected evidence to offer a novel account of the aesthetic and devotional parameters of art-making in later Byzantine society. He has also begun a second project on Byzantine enkolpia, a broad category of objects, ranging from miniature reliquaries to crosses and engraved gems mounted in precious metal, worn suspended on the chest. Proceeding from a detailed analysis of these diminutive and often highly intricate objects and of an array of textual sources that illuminate various aspects of their use and circulation, Drpic addresses a cluster of larger issues, among them the interplay between artifice, materiality, and the body; the convergence of optic and haptic forms of perception; and the role of devotional artifacts as social agents and instruments for negotiating personal and group identities. Being a native of Serbia, a special interest of Dr Drpic’s remains the art and culture of the Slavic Balkans.

Co-sponsored by the Hellenic Studies Program


http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Islamic Finance & Investments

Wednesday, May 16, 2012 | 7:00 pm Smith Memorial Student Union, room 327

Islamic Finance & Investments

A panel discussion featuring Ambassador Patrick N. Theros, President & Executive Director of the US-Qatar Business Council and Mohammad S. Rahman, founder of the Institute of Halal Investing & adjunct faculty, School of Business Administration, Portland State University

One of the latest revelations in the modern banking industry has been the introduction of Islamic finance and investment activities, referring to transactions that are compliant with Sharia Muslim law. Since its introduction in the late 20th century, Islamic banking has grown into an expanding global industry, and it is predicted that Shariah-compliant asset holdings will reach four trillion dollars by 2020. Muslim investors have also expanded Islamic finance activities into non-Muslim countries, often facing myths and misconceptions about the sector. In this panel discussion, Ambassador Patrick Theros and Mohammad S. Rahman will discuss the history, principles, and political atmosphere surrounding Islamic finance and investments.

Ambassador Patrick Theros is the President and Executive Director of the US-Qatar Business Council. He assumed this position after a 36-year career in the U.S. Foreign Service, serving as Ambassador to the State of Qatar; Political Advisor to the Commander in Chief Central Command; Deputy Chief of Mission and Political Officer in Amman; Charge d’affaires and Deputy Chief of Mission in Abu Dhabi; and Economic and Commercial Counselor in Damascus.

Mohammad Saeed Rahman is the founder of the Institute for Halal Investing as well as several business ventures and non-profit organizations. He is also an adjunct professor at the School of Business Administration at Portland State University. He was a member of the Reuters panel on Islamic finance in Singapore. Mr. Rahman has 25 years experience in the financial industry as Senior Vice President and Portfolio Manager at Wachovia and Vice President for Private Clients at Merrill Lynch.

Co-sponsored with the US-Qatar Business Council and the Institute of Halal Investing


Doing Business with Qatar: the World’s Fastest Growing Economy

Wednesday, May 16, 2012 | 7:15 am Multnomah Athletic Club, 1849 SW Salmon, Portland

Picture of Doing Business with Qatar: the World’s Fastest Growing Economy

This panel discussion, moderated by Ambassador Patrick Theros, President of the US-Qatar Business Council and former US Ambassador to Qatar, will provide an overview of the bilateral economic relationship between the US and Qatar. Panelists will highlight areas of economic opportunities, provide insight on the business climate and offer solutions to common challenges facing US firms looking to expand in Qatar.

  • Continental breakfast: 7:15 am
  • Presentation: 7:45 – 9 am

General Admission: $20 | Event sponsors & Portland State ID holders: Free

Co-sponsored with the US-Qatar Business Council & the School of Business Administration. This event is presented as a part of Portland’s World Trade Week


http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

The Deep-Roots of Modern Greece: Burden or Opportunity?, a lecture by Carol Thomas

Monday, May 14, 2012 | 1 pm East Hall, room 109, 632 SW Hall Street

Picture of The Deep Roots of Modern Greece:Burden or Opportunity?, a lecture by Carol Thomas

Carol Thomas (Ph.D., Northwestern University) is Professor of Greek History and Director of the Hellenic Studies Program at the University of Washington and author of Citadel to City State: The Transformation of Greece (Indiana University Press). For more information, click here.

Co-sponsored by the Hellenic Studies Program at Portland State University


Discoveries in the tomb of Senneferi, Pharaoh’s Chancellor

Saturday, May 12, 2012 | 5:30 pm Memorial Student Union Browsing Lounge (238), 1825 SW Broadway

Picture of Discoveries in the tomb of Senneferi, Pharaoh’s Chancellor

A slide-illustrated lecture on the story of the excavation of an 18th dynasty private tomb and the findings that reveal the life of the noble Senneferi by Dr. Nigel Strudwick, Visiting Professor, University of Memphis.

Senneferi’s career as an important official coincided with the middle to later reign of Thutmose III. Originally from the Delta, he was brought to Thebes to be in charge of the local administration and finances. His tomb on the West Bank has been rather neglected until the Cambridge Theban Tombs project began work on it in 1992. This lecture will look at the man himself, his family, and what his tomb tells us about the history of tomb use and reuse in Thebes. In addition to the discovery of painted walls, beautiful ceilings, pottery, statues, papyri and textiles, Dr. Strudwick’s archeological fieldwork reveals how elite tombs were symbolically and physically designed. Visit Dr. Strudwick’s website to learn more.

Dr Nigel Strudwick obtained his Ph.D. at the Department of Egyptology at the University of Liverpool, England and a B.A. in Ancient Egyptian and Coptic, Keble Collage, Oxford, England. He has been Assistant Keeper, Department of Ancient Egypt and Sudan, British Museum, London since 1978. He has written extensively on ancient Egypt, including scholarly works on Egyptian grammar and translations, as well as popular books such as Thebes in Egypt: A Guide to the Tombs and Temples of Ancient Luxor; Masterpieces of Ancient Egypt, which highlights the British Museum collection; and Hieroglyph Detective: How to Decode the Sacred Language of the Ancient Egyptians.

Presented by the Oregon Chapter of the American Research Center in Egypt, a private, nonprofit organization that supports research on all aspects of Egyptian history and culture, fosters broader knowledge among the general public, and strengthens American-Egyptian cultural ties.


Workshop: Arabic Calligraphy

Thursday, May 10 | 3 pm

Millar Library, room 170, 1875 SW Park Avenue

Workshop: The Art of Arabic Calligraphy

Kanaan Kanaan is Middle East Student Advisor at Portland State University. He is also an active artist, regularly participating in both solo and group shows.

Co-sponsored by the Portland State University Library.

Please visit The Gift of the Word, an exhibition of recent acquisitions to the Portland State University Special Collections | April 2, 2012 – June 20, 2012 | Millar Library, First Floor


http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Lunch & Learn: US-Iran Relations: To Bomb or Not To Bomb

Thursday, May 3 | 12 noon

East Hall, room 109, 632 SW Hall Street

Middle East Studies Center Lunch & Learn: US-Iran Relations: To Bomb or Not To Bomb

An informal conversation with Masoud Kheirabadi, adjunct faculty for International Studies, Geography, and Sociology at Portland State University.

Presented with funding from the Portland State University Internationalization Council Minigrant Program


Love: Just A Coincidence (2010)

Saturday, April 28 | 7 pm
5th Avenue Cinema, 510 SW Hall Street

Set in 1970s Ankara, Turkey, this film follows two star-crossed lovers whose lives are intertwined by a series of coincidences.

Featuring an introduction with Pelin Basci, Associate Professor of Turkish Language & Literature, Portland State University


Jewel of the Palace: Pearls as Markers of Elite Status in the Late Antique World

Friday, April 27 | 10 am
Art Building, room 200, 2000 SW Fifth Avenue

Joel Walker (Ph.D., Princeton University) is Associate Professor of History and Director of Persian and Iranian Studies in the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations at the University of Washington. Dr Walker is the author of The Legend of Mar Qardagh: Narrative and Christian Heroism in Late Antique Iraq (Transformation of the Classical Heritage) (University of California Press, 2006); his research and teaching focus on Late Antiquity, Byzantium, and the Early Middle Ages.

This talk will examine the role of pearls as objects of adornment and spirituality in the Roman Empire, early Christianity, Byzantium, the Sasanian Empire, and early Islam.

Presented by the Middle East Studies Center and co-sponsored by the Hellenic Studies Program


http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Revolt and Reform: Electoral Politics in the New North Africa

Tuesday, April 24 | 7 pm
Smith Memorial Student Union, room 294, 1825 SW Broadway

A panel discussion with Lindsay Benstead, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Portland State University and Ellen Lust, Associate Professor of Political Science, Yale University.

North Africa is a relatively understudied region in the Muslim world, yet it has been at the center of the Arab Spring. The Jasmine Revolution began in Tunisia in December 2010, leading to the ouster of President Ben Ali and unleashing a wave of popular discontent through the Middle East and beyond. North Africa stands at a crossroads, with Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Libya, and Egypt holding parliamentary, and in some cases, presidential elections in 2011 and 2012. Yet, the future of reform is uncertain and its results likely to be varied.

Lindsay J. Benstead (Ph.D. 2008, Public Policy and Political Science, University of Michigan—Ann Arbor) is Assistant Professor of Political Science in the School of Government where she teaches courses on Middle East and North African politics and research methods.

Ellen Lust’s research concerns the dynamics of political opposition, the formation of political institutions, and the links between foreign policy and domestic crisis, focusing on the Middle East. Her articles have appeared in International Interactions, Middle Eastern Studies, and edited volumes.


Mohsen Namjoo: Live in Concert

Friday, April 20 | 6 pm
Portland State University Lincoln Recital Hall, Room 75, 1620 SW Park Avenue

Mohsen Namjoo: Live in Concert

Hailed as “the Bob Dylan of Iran” by the New York Times, Mohsen Namjoo is a visionary artist who speaks for and touches the souls of today’s youth. Seamlessly blending the Classical with the Modern, the Eastern with the Western, the ancient with the current, Mohsen Namjoo is a musical maverick. A Non-conformist who not only takes on the centuries old traditions of Persian music, but also his own approach to composition, style and sound.

Presented by Persian Studies at Portland State University with funding from PARSA Community Foundation. Co-sponsored by the Department of World Languages & Literatures. Presented as part of the Spring 2012 International Performing Arts Series


Invoking the Secret Names of God: How Ethiopian Magic Scrolls Work for Protection and Healing

Wednesday, April 4 | 4 pm
Millar Library, room 170, 1875 SW Park Avenue

Invoking the Secret Names of God: How Ethiopian Magic Scrolls Work for Protection and Healing

An Old Testament scholar and a theological educator since 1979, Delamarter has facilitated learning in several Christian colleges and seminaries. Since 1993 he has been professor of Old Testament at George Fox Evangelical Seminary in Portland, Oregon. A fellow of the John Templeton Oxford Seminars on Science and Religion, Delamarter has an interest in the integration of science and faith and teaches a course on “Cosmology and Spiritual Formation.” He and his wife, Beth Habecker, a neuroscientist at Oregon Health and Sciences University, give presentations on “DNA and the Place of Humans in the Created Order.” In addition to being an amateur astronomer, Delamarter is an amateur musician, and has a small recording studio in his home. In recent years his research interests have focused on the digitization and cataloguing of more than 600 Ethiopic manuscripts that have come to North America.

Co-sponsored by the Portland State University Library and the Portland Center for Public Humanities

Please visit The Gift of the Word, an exhibition of recent acquisitions to the Portland State University Special Collections | April 2, 2012 – June 20, 2012 | Millar Library, First Floor

 


Download the Middle East Studies Center's Winter 2012 Calendar of Events

 

Content-Based Language Instruction Workshop

March 17, 9 am – 5 pm | March 18, 9 am – 12 n
Smith Memorial Student Union, Cascade Room (236), 1825 SW Broadway

The Portland State University Middle East Studies Center proudly hosts the Western Consortium of Title VI National Resource Centers for Middle East Studies’ Spring 2012 workshop.

This workshop will focus on content-based instruction for Arabic, Hebrew, Persian and Turkish languages and will draw on expertise from around the country as well as University resources, including Portland State’s Russian Flagship Program. Content-based instruction is among the cutting-edge areas of research in critical and less-commonly taught languages and Portland State University is well-positioned to lead pedagogical initiatives in the field. This conference has important practical consequences for a better understanding of pedagogical techniques and their application in the classroom; it will also provide scholars with a unique opportunity to meet, exchange and confront their views and methodologies.


Undergraduate Student Conference: the Middle East

Friday, March 9 | 9 am – 12:30 pm
Smith Memorial Student Union rooms 333 & 338, 1825 SW Broadway

The Portland State University Middle East Studies Center proudly hosts a conference on the Middle East for undergraduate students in the Portland area. The conference offered a unique opportunity for students with an interest in the Middle East to meet and learn more about the region from their peers. Much of the program will be devoted to student presentations. Attendees are invited to lead a session or to listen and participate in discussion.


Migration and Resettlement in the Assyrian Experience

Friday, March, 9 | 12 – 1:30 pm
Neuberger Hall 407

Migration and Resettlement in the Assyrian Experience

This paper, presented by Dr. Laura Robson, explores the regional and global ramifications of the League of Nations’ plan to resettle the Assyrian community of Iraq in the aftermath of the 1933 massacre.

Laura Robson is Assistant Professor of Modern Middle Eastern History at Portland State. She received her doctorate from Yale University in 2009, and is the author of Colonialism and Christianity in Mandate Palestine (University of Texas Press, 2011).

Co-sponsored by the Middle East Studies Center with the Portland Center for Public Humanities as part of their Faculty Lunch & Lecture series.


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Modern Art in Iraq: From the pioneers of the 1930s to the looting of 2003

Monday, February 27 | 7 pm
Smith Memorial Student Union 238, 1825 SW Broadway

Modern Art in Iraq: From the pioneers of the 1930s to the looting of 2003

Salam Atta Sabri is an Iraqi artist and the founder and Director of the Iraqi Pioneers Committee in Baghdad. Following the looting of 2003, he published a partial list of the artwork missing from the Museum. In addition, he founded a non-governmental organization that works to preserve the history and artworks of the pioneers of modern Iraqi fine arts (one of whom was his father).

Presented with co-sponsorship from The American Academic Research Institute in Iraq and the Council of American Overseas Research Centers, with funding from Carnegie Corporation of New York; Portland Community College’s Internationalization Initiative; the MA in Critical Theory and Creative Research at the Pacific Northwest College of Art; and the Portland State University Department of Art

Download Mr. Sabri’s presentation here.

Listen to Mr. Sabri’s lecture below or download the MP3.


http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Lunch & Learn: The Withdrawal of U.S. Military Forces from Iraq

Thursday, February 23 | 12 n
Smith Memorial Student Union Cascade Room (236), 1825 SW Broadway

Lunch & Learn: The Withdrawal of U.S. Military Forces from Iraq

On December 18, 2011, all U.S. military troops withdrew from Iraq, leaving behind an uncertain and undoubtedly fragile state. Steve Niva, member of the faculty at the Evergreen State College, will share his thoughts on the current state of Iraq.

Presented with funding from the Portland State University Internationalization Council Minigrant Program

Listen to Dr. Niva’s lecture below or download the MP3.


Iranian Women: A Film Series

Sunday, February 5 – Sunday, February 19
George C. Hoffmann Hall & 5th Avenue Cinema

Film Series: Iranian Women

The Middle East Studies Center and the Persian program in the Department of World Languages & Literatures at Portland State University are pleased to announce Iranian Women: A Film Series. The series will include screenings of the following Iranian films: Women Without Men (2010), Pearls on the Ocean Floor (2011), 20 Fingers (2004), and The Unwanted Woman (2005).

Presented with funding from Roshan Cultural Heritage Institute

All of the films screened in this series are available for borrowing from the MESC Resource Library.


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The Iraqi Refugee Experience

Thursday, February 9 | 7 pm
Smith Memorial Student Union, Cascade Room (236), 1825 SW Broadway

The Iraqi Refugee Experience

This talk will focus on displacement and the psychological and socioeconomic conditions that influence the transition of Iraqi refugees in Portland.

Baher Bhutti earned his PhD in Psychiatry from Baghdad University. He worked in Iraq as a psychiatrist, activist, and prolific writer until 2006 when his community activism made him a target of the emerging Iraqi militias. He found refuge in Portland, Oregon in 2007, was joined by his wife and children by 2009, and has since been working as a counselor, Iraqi refugee advocate, and community activist. In addition to working for the Lutheran Community Services, he serves on the Boards of the Center for Intercultural Organizing, Arab-Americans Cultural Center of Oregon, Advisory committee of Colored Pencils Art group, and is the founder of the Iraqi Society of Oregon.

Yasmeen Hanoosh is Assistant Professor of Arabic Language and Literature, Portland State University. She received her PhD in Arabic Language and Literature from the University of Michigan (2008) and specializes in the literatures and history of ethno-religious minorities in the Middle East, and also in Arabic literary translation.

Co-sponsored with Better-Life USA & the Iraqi Society of Oregon

Listen to the discussion below or download the MP3.


Middle East Education Abroad & FLAS Info Session

Wednesday, February 8, 2012 | 1:30 pm
East Hall, Room 109, 632 SW Hall St.

Join the Middle East Studies Center, Education Abroad advisors, and World Languages & Literatures faculty for an information session about studying abroad in the Middle East. This session will cover the basics of how PSU students can pursue education in a Middle Eastern country and scholarships for Middle East language and area studies. Information will also be given about the Foreign Language & Area Studies fellowships.


Scheherazade, Tell Me A Story

Friday, February 3 | 7 pm
Hollywood Theatre, 4122 NE Sandy Blvd

Scheherazade, Tell Me A Story

A 2009 film by one of Egypt’s foremost directors, Yousry Nasrallah, that dramatically captures the fusion of oppressive politics, repression, and the desire for freedom and creativity that have fueled the Arab Spring. Framed like The Arabian Nights and set in modern-day Cairo, the film centers on a popular talk-show host named Hebba. When pressured by her husband to tone down government criticism in her show so he can get a much-desired government job promotion, she turns her show’s attention to the lives of ordinary women. The results are not at all what her husband or his bosses expected. 135 min. In Arabic with English subtitles.

Presented as part of the 22nd Annual Cascade Festival of African Films Co-sponsored by Associated Students of Portland Community College (ASPCC) and Portland State University Black Studies Department, International Studies Department, and International Students.


Café Baghdad

Monday, January 30 | 7 pm
Food for Thought Cafe, Smith Memorial Student Union Basement, 1825 SW Broadway

Café Baghdad

Have Arab coffee with a Jew in the New York City of the Middle East. Through a collage of stories culled from memoirs, primary sources and poetry, this theatrical performance will introduce the audience to Jewish life in Baghdad in 1928. A conversation with local scholars will follow the show.
Presented by the Jewish Theatre Collaborative and co-sponsored by the Harold Schnitzer Family Program in Judaic Studies, Lewis & Clark Student Activities, the Congregation Ahavath Achim, and the Sephardic Cultural Center of Oregon

Listen to a clip below or download it.


Lunch & Learn: The Egyptian Revolution One Year Later

Thursday, January 26 | 12 n
Smith Memorial Student Union Browsing Lounge (238), 1825 SW Broadway

Lunch & Learn: The Egyptian Revolution One Year Later

Asmaa Taha is an Arabic Language Scholar at Reed College. She will share her thoughts on the current state of post-Mubarak Egypt. Presented with funding from the Portland State University Internationalization Council Minigrant Program. Co-sponsored by the Oregon Chapter, American Research Center in Egypt


http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Japan’s Global Claim to Islam: Transnational Nationalism & World Power 1900-1945

Wednesday, January 18 | 7 pm
Smith Memorial Student Union, Browsing Lounge (238), 1825 SW Broadway

Cultural Interactions Between Japan & the Middle East at the Turn of the 20th Century

The history of Imperial Japan’s interplay with the Muslim world reflects a history of transnational nationalism that is part of the inception of twentieth century world power behavior. By using the Islam card primarily through diaspora transnational actors, the pre-war Japanese global claim to Islam reflects the interlacing of intellectual history with that of intelligence in global strategic ambitions. Ayşe Selçuk Esenbel is Graduate Student Advisor in the Department of History at Bogaziçi University. Esenbel completed her undergraduate degree in History in the International Christian University (Japan) and George Washington University. She received her master’s degree from the Department of Japanese Language and Linguistics at Georgetown University and a PhD in Japanese history from Columbia University. She is a Professor in the Department of History at Bogazici University.

Presented by the Centers for Japanese and Middle East Studies. Co-sponsored by the Center for Turkish Studies and the Department of History

Listen to Dr. Esenbel’s lecture below or download the MP3.


http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Media Wars: Journalists, Generals and Jihadis

Tuesday, January 10 | 7 pm
Smith Memorial Student Union, room 328/9, 1825 SW Broadway

Picture of Media Wars: Journalists, Generals and Jihadis

Media drove the Arab Spring and it is a tool in the global spread of terrorism. Now governments are striking back. In this talk, Dr. Lawrence Pintak will explore the battle for hearts, minds and the computer. Lawrence Pintak is the founding dean of The Edward R. Murrow College of Communication at Washington State University He is a veteran of more than 30 years in journalism and the media business on four continents who now writes and lectures on America’s relationship with the Muslim world, the role of the media in shaping global perceptions and government policy, the future of journalism in a digital/globalized world, and the responsibilities of reporters covering conflict and social injustice.

Listen to Dr. Pintak’s lecture below or download the MP3.

 


Download the Middle East Studies Center's Fall 2011 Calendar of Events

 

http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpg

Dr. Nohad Toulan on Tahrir Square Three Hundred Days Later: Did the Revolution Really Succeed?

Tuesday, December 6, 2012 | 1:00 – 2:30 pm
Smith Memorial Student Union, Browsing Lounge (SMSU 238), 1825 SW Broadway

Picture of Tahrir Square Three Hundred Days Later: Did the Revolution Really Succeed?

Nohad A. Toulan is Dean Emeritus of Portland State University’s College of Urban & Public Affairs and Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the School of Urban Studies & Planning, and is an internationally recognized urban planner who contributed extensively to the development of major urban and regional plans in the U.S., the Middle East, North and West Africa. Dr. Toulan has been an adviser to the United Nations Development Program and to local and foreign governments on development issues. A native of Cairo and Alexandria, Dr. Toulan recently visited Egypt to witness firsthand the country’s “Second Revolution.”

Dr. Toulan will provide an update on the political and economic conditions in post-Mubarak Egypt. He will also report on the demands of the movement that overthrew the government and what changes the interim government has made in response to those demands since Mubarak’s departure.

Presented by:
· Toulan School of Urban Studies & Planning
· Center for Turkish Studies
· International Studies Program
· Middle East Studies Center
· Portland Center for Public Humanities

Listen to Dr. Toulan’s lecture below or download the MP3.


http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpgPost-Colonial Criticism & Muslim-Christian Relations in the Late Ottoman Empire

Wednesday, November 30, 2011 | 7 pm
School of Business Administration, room 140, 631 SW Harrison

Vangelis Kechriotis is Assistant to the Chair in Boğaziçi University Department of History. He holds a Ph.D. from the University of Leiden. His research interests include late Ottoman political and cultural history, Christians and Jewish communities, nationalism, the Balkans, port-cities, imperial ideology

Presented by the Portland State University Centers for Hellenic, Middle East and Turkish Studies and the Departments of History and World Languages & Literatures.

Listen to Dr. Kechriotis’s lecture below or download the MP3.


Sister Joanna from Mt. Sinai to Present Free Film on Contemporary Life at St. Catherine’s Monastery

Saturday, November 19 | film: 7pm, concert: 8pm
St. Mary’s Cathedral, 1739 NW Couch Street

Picture of Sister Joanna from Mt. Sinai  to Present Free Film on Contemporary Life at St. Catherine’s Monastery

Sr. Joanna is an Orthodox nun from the ancient Red Sea hermitage of Hammam Mousa (Springs of Moses), where the Hebrew people camped during the Exodus following the miraculous crossing of the Red Sea. She will give a free presentation one hour prior to the concerts by Cappella Romana of Mt Sinai Frontier of Byzantium.

Sister Joanna will begin with a video presentation called “Simplicity of Soul.” The film contemplates the mystery of simplicity of soul, which captivated the ascetic saints of the Sinai desert as requisite to the ultimate Christian goal of union with God. Stepping “off the grid” into a forbidding environment of granite mountains which offered neither protection from the elements nor basic dietary sustenance, these early monastics discounted extreme privation in order to experience divine revelation, which they recorded in famous works such as The Ladder of Divine Ascent, by St. John Climacus of Sinai, universally considered the most important spiritual manual in the history of the Christian tradition, secondary only to the Bible. Video and audio from the present day Monastery environs and worship services, images of the Burning Bush, ancient Monastery spiritual treasures, and the view from the Holy Summit of Sinai where Moses received the Decalogue (the Ten Commandments), would seem to indicate that modern life in Sinai has changed little since the massive present day fortress was raised by the Byzantine emperor Justinian in the 6th century.


Lunch & Learn: Humanitarian Aid in Libya: A Personal Account

Friday, November 18, 2011 | 12 n
East Hall, room 109, 632 SW Hall Street

Picture of Lunch & Learn: Omar Reda

Omar Reda is Assistant Professor of Psychiatry at Oregon Health and Science University; he will share his experiences from recent medical missions to Libya.


An evening with Peter Tomsen, author of The Wars of Afghanistan

Thursday, November 10, 2011 | 7 PM
Smith Memorial Student Union, room 294, 1825 SW Broadway

An evening with Peter Tomsen, author of The Wars of Afghanistan

Peter Tomsen was President George H. W. Bush’s Special Envoy on Afghanistan with the rank of Ambassador from 1989 to 1992. Tomsen entered the Foreign Service in 1967 and served in Thailand, Vietnam, India, China, and the Soviet Union. He was United States Deputy Chief of Mission in China from 1986 to 1989, deputy Assistant Secretary for East Asian Affairs from 1992 to 1995, and the American Ambassador to Armenia from 1995 to 1998. He lives in Virginia with his wife.

Co-sponsored with the World Affairs Council of Oregon and Mercy Corps Action Center


Middle East Education Abroad & FLAS Info Session

Tuesday, November 15, 2011 | 1:30 pm
East Hall, Room 109, 632 SW Hall St.

Join the Middle East Studies Center, Education Abroad advisors, and World Languages & Literatures faculty for an information session about studying abroad in the Middle East. This session will cover the basics of how PSU students can pursue education in a Middle Eastern country and scholarships for Middle East language and area studies. Information will also be given about the Foreign Language & Area Studies fellowships.


An evening of Palestinian Hip Hop

Friday, November 4, 2011
Salmon Street Studios, 109 SE Salmon St Portland
Slingshot Hip Hop Film: 5:30 pm
DAM Performance: 8:00 pm

An evening of Palestinian Hip Hop

The documentary film Slingshot Hip Hop (2008), screened as part of the Middle East Studies Center Film Series, braids together the stories of young Palestinians living in Gaza, the West Bank and inside Israel as they discover Hip Hop and employ it as a tool to surmount divisions imposed by occupation and poverty. From internal checkpoints and Separation Walls to gender norms and generational differences, this is the story of young people crossing the borders that separate them. The event will feature a discussion with the film’s Director, Jackie Reem Salloum and the Palestinian hip hop group, DAM

Based in Lod, Israel, Palestinian Hip Hop Artist DAM was founded in 1999 by brothers Tamar and Suhell Nafar and their friend Mahmoud Jreri, and their songs are largely about the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and poverty. The group’s name is the Arabic verb for “to last forever/eternity” (دام) and the Hebrew word for “blood” (דם), but can also be an acronym for “Da Arabian MCs.”

These all ages events are free and open to the public. Both are co-sponsored by the Portland State University Arab Persian Student Organization and Students United for Palestinian Equal Rights


Nicola Camerlenghi on Architectural History as Told by Transformations

Friday, November 4, 2011 | 11:30 am
Shattuck Hall Annex, 1914 SW Park Ave

Nicola Camerlenghi on Architectural History as Told by Transformations

Nick Camerlenghi is Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Oregon. He specializes in the study of early Christian and medieval art and architecture with particular focus on the city of Rome. His larger interests extend to the interplay between nature and architecture and the history of gastronomy. Prior to receiving his Ph.D. from Princeton University in 2007, he earned a Master of Architectural Studies from MIT and a Bachelor of Arts from Yale. His dissertation on the architectural renovations to the Basilica of San Paolo fuori le Mura in Rome is now being revised for book-length publication. In addition to this important study of one of Rome’s most significant buildings, Prof. Camerlenghi has turned his attention to broader questions that address scholarly approaches to buildings with long and complex histories, and to the development of domes across the medieval Mediterranean. His courses span from early medieval to Renaissance architecture. This talk focused on the Hagia Sophia.


Lunch & Learn: Implications of the United Nations Vote on Palestinian Statehood

Friday, October 28, 2011 | 12:00 n – 1:00 pm
East Hall, room 109, 632 SW Hall Street

Picture of Lunch & Learn: Implications of the United Nations Vote on Palestinian Statehood

  • Panelist Lindsay Benstead is Assistant Professor of Political Science in the School of Government where she teaches courses on Middle East and North African politics. Professor Benstead also examines gender-related dimensions of legislatures, public opinion, and survey methodology in the Middle East
  • Panelist Steve Niva teaches International Politics and Middle East Studies at the Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington. His primary areas of research and writing include the Israeli-Palestinian conflict; U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East; asymmetric warfare, counterinsurgency and political violence; and critical sovereignty studies
  • Panelist Laura Robson is Assistant Professor of Middle Eastern History at Portland State University. Her research and teaching focus on the history of religious and ethnic minorities and imperialism and decolonization in the modern Arab world
  • Moderator James Grehan is Associate Professor Middle Eastern History and Director of the Middle East Studies Center at Portland State University. He teaches courses on the history of the early modern and modern Middle East (since 1500), world history, Ottoman history, early modern and modern Islam, and popular culture & popular religion

An evening of laughs with stand-up comedians Amer Zahr & Max Amini

Saturday, October 29, 2011 | 7:30 pm
Smith Memorial Student Union Ballroom, 1825 SW Broadway

Amer Zahr is an Arab-American stand-up. Drawing on his experiences growing up as a child of Palestinian refugees, he finds the humor is everyday cultural situations. As a Palestinian, politics also fall victim to his comedic ways. He has performed in festival, and produced and headlined in 2 of his own comedy tours, “1001 Laughs Comedy Tour” & “We’re Not White!” Amer also writes and speaks widely on political and social affairs, and has appeared on radio and television, including ABC’s “Politically Incorrect with Bill Maher.” He has performed throughout North America & the Middle East.

Max Amini was born in Tucson Arizona, from an Iranian heritage. He was raised on the East Coast and graduated from UCLA’s school of Theater, Film and Television in 2004. Max began his stand-up comedy career in 2002 at the LA Improv. The show was his final class in a comedy workshop, and despite being the self-described “worst kid in class” by the end of his performance the audience was in awe of his act. For nine years Max has performed the world over, expressing his views on family and cultural topics through his spectacular theatrics and energetic humor. He was chosen as one of the finalists for NBC’s Diversity Showcase in 2009, and he developed a stand-up comedy tour named “Exotic Imports” featuring second-generation Americans coming from diverse cultural backgrounds.

Co-sponsored with the Portland State University Arab Persian Student Organization


Rami Khouri on Diplomatic Stalemate and Democratic Revolts

Thursday, October 20, 2011, reception & exhibits from 6:00pm; presentation at 7:30pm
Westminster Presbyterian Church, 1624 NE Hancock

Picture of Rami Khouri on Diplomatic Stalemate and Democratic Revolts: Making Sense of a Middle East in Transit

Rami George Khouri is a Palestinian-Jordanian and US citizen whose family resides in Beirut, Amman, and Nazareth. He is the Director of the Issam Fares Institute of Public Policy and International Affairs at the American University of Beirut as well as editor-at-large of the Beirut-based Daily Star newspaper. He is an internationally syndicated political columnist and author. Rami was a visiting scholar at Stanford University in October 2006, and in November 2006, he was the co-recipient of the Pax Christi International Peace Award for his efforts to bring peace and reconciliation to the Middle East.

Presented by the Institute for Christian Muslim Understanding co-sponsored with Portland Community College, the Westminster Presbyterian Church, and the Portland State University Center for Turkish Studies


An Evening with Ken Ballen, author of Terrorists in Love

Wednesday, October 19, 2011 | 7:30 pm
Powell’s City of Books, 1005 W Burnside

In the world of Ken Ballen’s Terrorists in Love (Free Press), a boy’s dreams dictate the behavior of warriors in battle, a young couple’s only release from forbidden love is death, and religious extremism, blind hatred, and endemic corruption combine to form a lethal ideology that can hijack a man’s life forever. A former federal prosecutor and congressional investigator, Ballen offers an intimate and enlightening window into the heart of Islamic fundamentalism, providing a glimpse into the lives, loves, frustrations, and methods of those whose mission it is to destroy us.

Co-sponsored by the Middle East Studies Center with Powell’s City of Books


Iraq Today: A Roundtable on Current Events

Monday, October 17, 2011 | 7 pm
Smith Memorial Student Union, room 298, 1825 SW Broadway

Join us at this roundtable event featuring Dr. Yasmeen Hanoosh, Assistant Professor of Arabic Language and Literature at Portland State University, and Dr. Bridget Guarasci from the University of Michigan. The panel will be moderated by the Middle East Studies Centers director, James Grehan.

Co-sponsored by the Portland Center for Public Humanities


http://www.pdx.edu/middle-east-studies/sites/www.pdx.edu.middle-east-studies/files/Podcast_0.jpgPeople, Power, and Protest: Teaching about the Occupied Palestinian Territories

Friday, October 14, 2011 | 9:30 am – 4:30 pm
Urban Center 710, Portland State University, 506 SW Mill St

People, Power, and Protest: Teaching about the Occupied Palestinian Territories

Join the Middle East Studies Center for an educators’ workshop on how to teach about the occupied Palestinan territories. The workshop will focus on the use of hip hop music and art to teach about social and political protest in the occupied Palestinan territories.


Impacts of 9/11: Two Free Webinars for Educators

The U.S. & Afghanistan: September 26, 2011 | 4:30 – 5:30 pm
The U.S. & Iraq: October 6, 2011 | 4:30 – 5:30 pm

Impacts of 9/11: Two Free Webinars for Educators

Join teachers from around the country for this webinar on Iraq. Focus for it will be on addressing how the involvement of the US in Iraq after the 9/11 attacks can be used to teach about World History II, Contemporary Events, US Foreign Policy, Middle East Studies, Conflict Resolution; Gain new teaching resources and techniques for classroom application from other teachers.

Cosponsored by The Choices Program, Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University, Harvard Center for Middle Eastern Studies Outreach Center


Out of Cordoba Film Screening

Saturday, September 24 | 8 pm
Portland State University Lincoln Recital Hall, Room 75, 1620 SW Park Avenue

A documentary about Averroes the Muslim, and Maimonides the Jew, the two leading thinkers of Islamic Spain. The film explores the historical importance of these two “wise men of Cordoba,” as well as their contemporary impact on today’s Jews, Muslims, and Christians, and interfaith relations. Featuring a discussion with the film’s Director, Jacob Bender

Co-sponsored by the Muslim Educational Trust with funding from Oregon Humanities, the Archdiocese of Portland in Oregon, St. James Lutheran Church, Jewish Voice for Peace, the World Affairs Council of Oregon, Portland State University Sociology of Islam & Muslim Societies, & the Institute for Christian-Muslim Understanding


Radwan Ziadeh on the Damascus Spring: Syria’s Struggle for Democracy

Wednesday, September 21, 2011 | 7 pm
Smith Memorial Student Union, Browsing Lounge, room 238, 1825 SW Broadway

Radwan Ziadeh is a Visiting Scholar at the Institute for Middle East Studies at the Elliot School of International Affairs at George Washington University. He is the founder and director of the Damascus Center for Human Rights Studies in Syria and co-founder and executive director of the Syrian Center for Political and Strategic Studies in Washington, DC. He has written ten books and edited five. His most recent book is Power and Policy in Syria: Intelligence Services, Foreign Relations and Democracy in the Modern Middle East (2011).

Co-sponsored by the World Affairs Council of Oregon


Resource Library Open House

Tuesday, September 20, 2011 | 5 – 6:30 PM
East Hall Rm. 121, 632 SW Hall St.

Please join the Middle East Studies Center in celebrating the launch of the new Resource Library. There is an extensive lending library of curricular materials, teaching resources, books for K-12 students, maps, posters, teaching materials and DVDs. Resources may be borrowed at no cost.

 


 

Experience Ramadan

Wednesday, August 24, 2011 | 7-10pm
Portland State University Multicultural Center, Smith Memorial Student Union, room 228, 1825 SW Broadway

Muslims mark the holy month of Ramadan by giving up food, drink, smoking, and other physical needs from dawn to dusk as a way of spiritual purification. Communities gather together after sunset for Iftar, the meal to break the fast.

Featuring a Panel Discussion: Personal Stories of Ramadan, Maghrib (evening prayer), and Iftar

Co-sponsored by the Portland State University Muslim Student Association, Saudi Student Club, UAE Student Group, and Arab Persian Organization


12th Annual Portland Iranian Festival

Saturday, August 6th | 10:00 AM
South Park Blocks, Portland State University

Come to enjoy: Iranian food and desert – Wine and beer – Iranian ethnic costumes, live music, dance performance and dance lessons, arts and carpet – Local business vendors, and non-profit exhibits – Children’s activities – Games and more

For more information call Andisheh Center at 971-400-8268


People, Power, and Protest: Teaching About Iran

Friday, August 5, 9:00 AM
Urban Center, Rm 212G at PSU

This workshop will prepare K-12 educators to teach about current forms of protest in Iran including the 2009 Green Revolution, the use of social media, and various forms of pop culture. Through interactive and participatory sessions, teachers will increase their knowledge about Iran and explore teaching strategies that encourage students to think critically. Educators will receive a wide range of resources to support their teaching.


Lunch & Learn: The Changing Middle East: Revolution in Egypt, Libya and Beyond

Wednesday, July 27 | 1:30 pm

 

PSU Office of International Affairs and Middle East Studies Center Present:
THE CHANGING MIDDLE EAST: REVOLUTION IN EGYPT, LIBYA AND BEYOND
An informal conversation with Abeer Etefa, Senior Regional Information Officer for the Middle East, UN World Food Programme


White Meadows

Saturday, July 16, 2011 | 9:00 PM and Sunday, July 17, 2011 | 7:00 PM
Whitsell Auditorium, 1219 SW Park Avenue

Rasoulof’s enigmatic feature tells the story of Rahmat, an elderly man who collects the tears of souls in pain in a tiny pitcher—remaining all the while a nonjudgmental witness to the absurd havoc wreaked by the powers that be. Traveling by boat to scenes of sorrow through a seascape dotted with salty white islands and cliffs, he encounters a woman consigned to the sea for rejecting an unwanted marriage, an artist punished for his choice of colors, a young virgin drowned as a sacrifice to the gods in hopes of rain, and other unfortunates. An allegory for government persecution of artistic expression, this elegant, poetic feature is both timely and timeless. Like the waters Rahmat sails, the tears of the grief-stricken, which are said to turn to pearls, are expansive.


World Beat Festival

June 25 and June 26, 2011
Riverfront Park, Salem

Salem Multicultural Institute Presents “Salem World Beat Festival’’. The weekend extravaganza includes three processions and more than 120 performances, demonstrations and workshops, plus a hundred cultural vendors and exhibitors. The 23-acre park is covered with nine performance areas and five World Villages, each with a children’s cultural tent with free activities. The Festival features music from around the world, cultural arts, dance and food including Middle Eastern and North African Dance and drumming. Be sure to visit the Middle East Tent hosted by the Portland State University Middle East Studies Center and the Arab American Cultural Center of Oregon. For more information please visit the World Beat website.