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PSU Professor Robert Strongin Partners with Boulder Diagnostics
PSU Professor Robert Strongin Partners with Boulder Diagnostics

Portland State University's office of Innovation & Intellectual Property (IIP) has focused on innovations from the lab of Dr. Robert Strongin, Professor of Organic Chemistry, since his arrival at PSU. After several years and many projects, IIP is proud to highlight and announce the execution of an exclusive patent licensing agreement with a diagnostics development company. Boulder Diagnostics and PSU are partnering to further develop Dr. Strongin’s new organic and organometallic reagents into diagnostic tests that may have a profound impact on the diagnostic capabilities of health service centers throughout the United States, as well as in underdeveloped and underserved markets across the world where such technologies are desperately needed.

Current methods for the detection and diagnosis of conditions such as cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer’s, and neural tube defects are, where they exist, expensive and reliant on fragile biological materials that are difficult to store and deliver in many parts of the world. Dr. Strongin’s solution to this problem is a simple test, easily stored and with a long shel-flife, that employs organic dyes capable of detecting molecules of biological importance that are indicative of specifically targeted conditions. “The groundbreaking technology of Professor Strongin and his team can form the basis for a new line of products,” said Wolfgang Pieken, CEO of Boulder Diagnostics in a recent press release.

In his own words, Dr. Strongin and his team at the Strongin Research Group specialize in “relatively nonpolar, small molecules that are disease biomarkers.” Using the new dyes and test strips, in a method described as being similar to pH testing, Dr. Strongin stated that without using “expensive instrumentation and complex methods, you can look at the color or fluorescence change, and based on that change and its intensity [you could] know how much of one type of specific disease marker you have.” Developed entirely in Dr. Strongin’s lab at Portland State University, these new technologies may have an impact on the ability of doctors and clinicians to make diagnoses and provide long-term as well as preventative healthcare.

Working with Innovation & Intellectual Property and Boulder Diagnostics, Dr. Strongin’s new organic and organometallic reagents technologies are in the process of being patented and having their many applications developed. The potential for these technologies to save lives, change lives, is one not to be overlooked, and is why Dr. Strongin and his team are some of Portland State University’s most compelling innovators.