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Inventory & QA/QC

Inventory. The first step is to identify what bicycle and pedestrian count data you have.  If you’re not aware of any bicycle and pedestrian count programs in your area, ask around.  Bicycle and pedestrian count data can be found in some of the most unexpected places.

QA/QC. Unfortunately, much of the bicycle and pedestrian count data available today has received little or no quality assurance and quality control (QA/QC).   Here we provide some guidance on how to set up such a program.

Resources:

Lindsey and others summarize the bicycle and pedestrian count inventory process conducted in three states.

 

 


GUIDANCE FROM THE TRAFFIC MONITORING GUIDE 2013, SECTION 4.4.1

4.4.1 STEPS 1 AND 2: REVIEW THE EXISTING CONTINUOUS COUNT PROGRAM; DEVELOP AN INVENTORY OF AVAILABLE CONTINUOUS COUNT LOCATIONS AND EQUIPMENT

The first two steps are to inventory, review, and assess what your agency currently has (in regard to permanent monitoring locations and equipment). This may be a short exercise for some agencies, as permanent continuous counts are much less common than short-duration pedestrian and bicyclist counts.

However, these first two steps should not be bypassed simply because your own agency does not have permanent count locations. Because non-motorized traffic levels are typically higher on lower-volume and lower functional class roads/streets as well as shared use paths and pedestrian facilities, city and county agencies and metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) have often been more active than State DOTs in monitoring non-motorized traffic.

Therefore, if a State DOT traffic data collection program will monitor non-motorized traffic, they should coordinate with local and regional agencies as they inventory and review existing continuous counts. Additionally, they should inquire with departments other than the transportation or public works department. The following lists possible agencies and/or departments that may have installed permanent pedestrian and bicyclist counters:

  • City or county parks and recreation department (e.g., on shared use paths);
  • National or State parks (e.g., on internal or connector paths);
  • Public health departments (e.g., monitoring physical activity);
  • Retail or business associations (e.g., on pedestrian malls or plazas); and
  • Pedestrian and/or bicyclist advocacy groups.

The process outlined in Section 3.2.1 for motorized traffic volume is equally applicable for non-motorized traffic.