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Heejun Chang

 

Heejun Chang 
  Professor & Chair of Geography                 503.725.3162  changh@pdx.edu 

   Office Hours

Web page

Integrated land and water use planning

Education
Ph.D. Geography (2001),
 Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA
M.A. Geography (1996),
 Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea
B.A. Geography (1994),
 Seoul National University, Seoul, Korea

Research Interests: Hydrology and water resources, with focus on human modification of the hydrologic system and interactions among climate change, land use change, and water management as they affect water quantity, quality, demand, and hydrologic ecosystem services.


Courses Taught

GEOG 210 Physical Geography
GEOG 310U Climate and Water Resources
GEOG 340U Global Water Issues and Sustainability
GEOG 4/514 Hydrology
GEOG 4/547 Urban Streams
GEOG 4/594 GIS for Water Resources
GEOG 4/597 Spatial Quantitative Analysis

Graduate Students
 Ryan Bonnette: Effects of scale variation on urban water use studies
 Alexis Cooley
 Zbigniew Grabowski: (SOE PhD, co-advised with Elise Granek): The influence of ecological and environmental  values in guiding urban development pathways 
 Harvey Hembree: Using spatial statistics to predict and model stream temperature om urbanizing basin
 Luong Hue (SOE PhD)
 Daniel Larson (SOE PhD) 
 Alexander Nagel 
 Jeff Ramsey: Spatial analysis of ecosystem services provided by urban trees


Publications & Presentations & Media

Britt Crow-Miller, Heejun ChangPhilip StokerElizabeth A. Wentz (2016) Facilitating Collaborative Urban Water Management through University-Utility Cooperation, Sustainable Cities and Society  doi:10.1016/j.scs.2016.06.006

S. Ahilan, M. Guan, A. Sleigh, N. Wright and H. Chang  (2016) The Influence of Floodplain Restoration on Flow and Sediment Dynamics in an Urban River, Journal of Flood Risk Management DOI: 10.1111/jfr3.12251

May 26, 2016- Graduate Student Eric Watson presented poster  "Examining Landscape: Stream temperature relationships using spatially explicit indicators" at Johnson Creek Science Symposium

Hossein Parandvash and Heejun Chang (2016) Analysis of Long-Term Climate Change on per Capita Water Demand in Urban Versus Suburban Areas in the Portland Metropolitan Area, USA, Journal of Hydrology, 574-586 

 Jonathan Straus, Heejun Chang, Chang-yu Hong, 2016, An Exploratory Path Analysis of Attitudes, Behaviors and  Summer Water Consumption in the Portland Metropolitan Area, Sustainable Cities and Society

 Using spatially explicit indicators to investigate watershed characteristics and stream temperature relationships        Science of The Total Environment: Volume 551-552, 376-386, May 2016 Authors: Zbigniew J. Grabowski, Eric  Watson and Heejun Chang 

 February 8, 2016 - Urban Ecology and Conservation Symposium, Portland, OR 
  • Seong Yun Cho and Heejun Chang
    Poster: "Assessment of urban flood vulnerability using an indicator-based approach – a case study for Portland, Oregon

 November 24, 2015 - Heejun Chang gave an invited presentation titled "Climate change and stream temperature:  Implications for fish habitat" at the US Geological Survey. 

Recent Grants & Awards

Heejun Chang received an award from National Science Foundation (co-PI), Analyzing the Effects of Spatial Autocorrelation in Geospatial Databases $ 336,478.00. May 2016

 Heejun Chang is a co-PI on a $500,000 grant "CC*DNI Networking Infrastructure: Research and Innovation Network  for Portland State University” from the National Science Foundation for the period 9/1/2015 to 8/31/2017. This  project will improve the network infrastructure at PSU and help support faster and more secure data transfers that  are needed for big-data science. 

 Heejun Chang received funding of $99,678 from the Institute for Sustainable Solutions for the project "Climate  change and floodrisk in Portland". The project will run from August 10th 2015 to August 10th 2017

 Heejun Chang is a member of the 12M NSF sponsored Urban Resilience to Extremes Sustainablity Research Network  to study the effects of extreme climate events on urban infrastructure. July 2015