Search Google Appliance


Climate


Coastal Climate

The most significant impact on Climate in the Oregon Coast farming region is its proximity to the Pacific Ocean. Moderate temperatures with relatively heavy precipitation characterize the area, with rising maritime air cooling, and condensing as it meets the coast range. A majority of this precipitation falls during winter months, while dense summer fog adds moisture. Western hemlock/Sitka spruce forests dominate in this region, making naturally cleared sites relatively sparse. This combination of unique climate and vegetation has lead to agricultural industries that require clearing of land or cultivation and harvest of moisture and shade tolerant crops. 

Other factors that influence crop growth are the region's sandy, coastal soils and the heavy influence of wind coming inland from the Pacific Ocean.

The coast has a relatively long growing season with ranging about 190-250 days. A north-south temperature gradient reveals a cooler climate in northern parts of Oregon, with increasing temperatures to the south. An elevational gradient is also present with the coast range sloping upward, gaining about 1 k in elevation from the northern part of the region to the south. 
Picture
Image courtesy of: http://imageshack.us

  • North Astoria Temperatures: Jan  ave. daily high ~ 48 degrees (F) and low ~36 (F); July high~67 degrees, and low ~53 degrees.
  • South Coast, Brookings: Jan ave. daily high~ 55 degrees, and low ~42 degrees; July~ 68 degrees, and low ~52 degrees.
Picture
Image courtesy of: http://www.unitedcountry.com