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Negotiating Memories: The Columbia River Treaty Remembered
Thursday, May 12, 2011 - 5:30pm

The Center for Columbia River History, in partnership with the Oregon Historical Society and with support from the James B. Castles Endowment presents

"Negotiating Memories: The Columbia River Treaty Remembered"

WHAT: An illustrated presentation of Negotiating Memories: The Columbia River Treaty Remembered, followed by response from the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and the Columbia Basin Trust

WHO: Dr. Jeremy Mouat, Professor of History and Chair of Social Sciences at the Augustana Faculty of the University of Alberta and currently a visiting Fulbright scholar at Arizona State University.

WHEN: May 12, 5:30 p.m.

WHERE: Oregon Historical Society, 1200 SW Park Ave., Portland

COST: Free

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION
The Columbia River treaty re-defined the river. This agreement between Canada and the United States on the development and operation of dams for power and flood control in the upper river basin established a management regime that continues to this day. Although signed in 1961 with additional provisions in 1964, American planners identified the need for Canadian water storage much earlier. Treaty negotiations provided the opportunity to fulfill these plans: to coordinate river basin management, maximize efficient power production at dams along the river, and to enable better flood control. In this illustrated talk, Dr. Jeremy Mouat will use the historical remnants of those who participated in shaping the agreement--memoirs, interviews and personal papers--to explore the treaty's intended meaning, Canadian-American relations, competing political jurisdictions, and regional, national and continental energy policies.

Dr. Mouat's talk will be followed by comments from John Shurts, General Counsel for the Northwest Power and Conservation Council and Kindy Gosal, Director, Water and Environment, for the Columbia Basin Trust.

This program is presented by the Center for Columbia River History in partnership with the Oregon Historical Society and with support from the James B. Castles Endowment

DR. JEREMY MOUAT
Dr. Jeremy Mouat is Professor of History and Chair of Social Sciences at the Augustana Faculty of the University of Alberta and currently a visiting Fulbright scholar at Arizona State University. A prolific author, Dr. Mouat has written three monographs as well as numerous articles and book chapters. Awards include the Tibesar Prize for the most distinguished article in the journal The Americas during 2009, the Louis Knott Koontz Memorial Award for the most outstanding article in the Pacific Historical Review in 2006, and the John M. Townley Award for the best article published in the Mining History Journal in 2003. His major research and teaching interests are in western Canadian history, the history of Canadian-American relations, and the history of technology.

This talk will be based on his current research at the North American Center for Transborder Studies, where he is researching the negotiation of the Columbia River Treaty (1961/1964) between Canada and the United States, up for possible renegotiation in 2014.

JAMES B. CASTLES ENDOWMENT PROGRAMS
The Castles Programs are funded through a generous endowment from the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust, of which James B. Castles was a founding trustee and twenty-year board member. Born in Montana, Jim Castles spent his life pursuing and promoting the art, culture, and heritage of the Columbia and the American West. He valued public, informal education that stimulated discussion about the history of the region he loved. The Castles Endowment programs bring regional and national specialists in Columbia River Basin history, literature, art, or politics to speak in various locations around the Basin.

The Center for Columbia River History (CCRH) is a regional consortium that includes the Washington State Historical Society, Washington State University Vancouver, and Portland State University.

CCRH offices are located on the Fort Vancouver National Site in Vancouver, Washington
and at Portland State University.