Search Google Appliance


Events

Farming the Waters: Japanese Oyster Growers in Willapa Harbor, Washington
Tuesday, September 7, 2010 - 12:00pm to Wednesday, September 8, 2010 - 7:00pm

To CLAS: the Center for Columbia River History is a consortium that includes PSU, Washington State University Vancouver, and the Washington State Historical Society. The director, Dr. Katrine Barber, is a professor in the History Department at PSU.

Center for Columbia River History
Date: August 19, 2010

Contact: Center for Columbia River History
Donna Sinclair, Program Manager
360-258-3289
info@ccrh.org, www.ccrh.org

The Center for Columbia River History Presents
"Farming the Waters: Japanese Oyster Growers in Willapa Harbor, Washington"

WHAT: Illustrated presentation

WHO: Katy Fry, recipient of the Center for Columbia River History 2009 James B. Castles fellowship

WHEN AND WHERE:
Tuesday, September 7, 2010, 12:00 p.m., at Washington State University Vancouver, Multimedia Center 22. Directions and a campus map are available at http://www.vancouver.wsu.edu/community/campus-map-directions-and-parking...

Wednesday, September 8, 2010, 7:00 p.m., at Columbia Pacific Heritage Center, Ilwaco, Washington. Directions are available at http://columbiapacificheritagemuseum.org/plan-your-visit/

COST: Free

Washington State's oyster industry has never received the same iconic status as other natural resource industries. Consequently, the story of an important group of oyster laborers also goes unnoticed. When Pearl Harbor was bombed in 1941, six of the eight most important oyster packing houses almost exclusively employed Japanese and Japanese Americans. Almost half of the oysters opened in Willapa Harbor in the southeast corner of the state occurred in Japanese American owned businesses. These companies played an instrumental role in creating and sustaining the oyster industry in Willapa Harbor, with important cultural and economic reverberations in the greater Columbia River Basin. This illustrated talk illuminates the lives of Japanese American oysterers, how they interacted with the surrounding community, and their fate upon America's entrance into World War II.

Katy Fry is a doctoral candidate in the History department at Washington State University in Pullman, where she also received her Master's degree in the American Studies department (2006). Her work revolves around issues of immigration and labor in the American West. Her dissertation project, a portion of which she will present at WSU Vancouver and at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum, explores the intersection of race/ethnicity, labor, and the environment in Washington State's oyster industry history.

This program is presented by the Center for Columbia River History in partnership with the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum and with support from the James B. Castles Endowment

JAMES B. CASTLES FELLOWSHIP

The Castles fellowship supports original scholarly research that contributes to public understanding of Columbia River Basin history. During her year as Castles fellow, During her year as Castles fellow, Fry conducted research at Pacific County Historical Society, Wing Luke Asian Museum, Oyster Bay, Mason County Historical Society, Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum and the Washington State Archives and Library. As part of the fellowship, Fry will present this public talk at WSU Vancouver and at the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum in Ilwaco, Washington.

The Castles Programs are funded through a generous endowment from the M.J. Murdock Charitable Trust, of which James B. Castles was a founding trustee and twenty-year board member. Born in Montana, Jim Castles spent his life pursuing and promoting the art, culture, and heritage of the Columbia and the American West. He valued public, informal education that stimulated discussion about the history of the region he loved. The James B. Castles Endowment fund supports free public programming by the Center for Columbia River History.

The Center for Columbia River History (CCRH) is a regional consortium that includes the Washington State Historical Society, Washington State University Vancouver, and Portland State University. CCRH offices are located on the Fort Vancouver National Site in Vancouver, Washington and at Portland State University.