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ELP Course Descriptions

Check here for information about when courses are offered, as well as additional course listing information.

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ELP 410U
Gandhi, Zapata and Topics in New Agrarianism (4)
What is the role of food, land and agriculture in the imagination of an ecologically sustainable, socially just, and bio-culturally diverse future? This course examines the legacies Mahatma Gandhi and Emiliano Zapata might have for the emergent local food economy in North America and in individual student's bioregion. While firmly grounded in the farms and gardens in the Portland Metro area, students review local, bioregional and global trends in production, distribution and marketing of food, and develop comparative perspectives.

ELP 410/510
Garden-Based Education Research (4)
This is an on-line course. Students interested in doing a literature review of the research on Garden Based Education and synthesizing the research around themes such as: food and nutrition, academic performance, health, social development, motivation and engagement., etc., are encouraged to sign up for the course.

ELP 410/510
Learning Gardens and Sustainability Education (4)
By now, many of us are familiar with the themes of "sustainability" and "sustainability education;" in fact, living and studying in the Northwest, it would be most surprising if our psyche were not shaped by concerns about the environment. What is not clear is whether we, as educators, community organizers, designers, and activists, know precisely how to devise curriculum, teach, learn, or prepare educators and leaders who could create a world that is livable, ecologically sustainable, bio-culturally diverse, and socially just. As the field of sustainability education is new and wide-open, this course will use the Learning Gardens framework to break new grounds for sustainability education.

ELP 410/510

LECL Naturalist Mentoring (2-4)
This course offers cutting-edge multi-sensory participation in our embodied ecosystems through which one learns the language of the more than human world by practicing arts, sciences, and crafts rooted in sustainable earth based cultures. Students are engaged in restoring the bond between people and the natural world in order to foster our sense of place and embrace this earth as our own home. This course returns to those hunting gathering roots of awareness and learning tested and refined through thousands of years of human survival.

ELP
410/510
Nonviolence and Gandhi's Educational Philosophy (4)
This course has a two-fold goal: to study the principle of nonviolence as defined by Gandhi and to examine how this principle may be applied in our daily lives, including educational and other work settings. We will explore the links between nonviolence and Gandhi's notions of community, sarvodaya (welfare of all), anekantvada (belief in many doctrines), labor, self-sufficiency, advaita (non-dualism), enoughness, yajna (sacrifice), and non-exploitative modes of living proposed by Gandhi. Throughout the course, we will extract this connection as we examine his educational program of nai talim (new education). This course adopts a unique approach to practicing nonviolence and conflict resolution in education. Daily, educators are bombarded with "new" strategies for dealing with conflicts and challenges. While we will search for and develop specific practical approaches to dealing with these challenges, the participants will ask "broader" questions related to what it means to be nonviolent. We will consider the contemporary relevance of Gandhi's nonviolence as a way of living focusing on key facets of Gandhian theory and practice for ecological sustainability.

ELP 410U/510
Spiritual Leadership (4)
This course focuses on traditional and modern perspectives of "religiousness" and what is often called the "spiritual." Students discuss how such notions are integrated with the "whole of living" including what it means "to be fully human." Students also probe into whether secular leadership of something spiritual is different from spiritual leadership of something secular, and if so, how. All projects and readings are designed to create an open inquiry into the question of "What is spiritual leadership?"

ELP 410/510
Permaculture and Whole Systems Design I (4)
Building on the work of permaculture co-originators Bill Mollison and David Holmgren, this course looks at the later development of these ideas by Patrick Whitefield, Lea Harrison, and other 2nd- and 3rd-generation permaculturists, the course presents permaculture as an ethically based whole-systems design that uses concepts, principles, and methods derived from ecosystems, indigenous peoples, and other time-tested systems to create sustainable human settlements and institutions. This course will explore permaculture in-depth while also reviewing the evolution of whole-systems design, and the application of self-organization design.

ELP 410/510
Permaculture and Whole Systems Design II (4)
This course builds upon the knowledge gained in Part I of Permaculture and Whole Systems, and explore, in-depth, methods of whole systems design, advanced pattern literacy, biomimicry, appropriate technology, energy systems, land use philosophy and practice, and education and teaching methods in permaculture. Much of the course will be presented through experiential learning exercises, group discussion and projects, and hands-on activities. A portion of this course is dedicated to a final design project, in which student teams will create a permaculture design for Learning Gardens Laboratory, JEANS Urban Farm, or other suitable sites. Prerequisite: Permaculutre and Whole Systems Design I

ELP 418/518
Educational Leadership in Public Schools (4)
Familiarizes students with the theoretical development, empirical studies, policies, and decision making processes of public schooling. Structured around a number of themes, including instructional leadership, moral leadership, democratic leadership, facilitative leadership, curricular leadership, constructivist leadership, and ethical leadership in education. Students explore the operational meaning of these perspectives through a combination of experiences including class discussions, case studies, guest speakers, and interviews and observations of school leaders at work.

ELP 429/529
Principles of Training and Development (3)
Examination of the principles of training and development with emphasis on applying adult learning theory to the training function. Essential principles include those related to developing training objectives, selecting training methods and resources, sequencing the learning experiences, and evaluating the training. Designed for trainers from a variety of work settings with a strong background in a content area who have little background in adult learning theory and its application to training and development practices.

ELP 430/530
Course Design and Evaluation (4)
Examination of the field of instructional program design for adult learners within the training and development field, in educational and non-educational organizational settings. Focus on learning to design and manage instructional activities in response to training needs and skills analyses. Students are required to select and use an appropriate design model, design a preliminary needs assessment, develop program goals and learning objectives, develop an instructional plan, develop a plan to assess student learning and evaluate the program, and critically review the design document. Major emphasis given to developing the instructional design document that demonstrates a student's ability to align and integrate effectively all aspects of the design process and to incorporate adult learning theory. Recommended prerequisite: ELP 429/529.

ELP 431/531
Contemporary Issues in Training and Development (3)
Building on competencies developed during previous courses in the training and development series, provides a culminating experience to the series. Provides an opportunity for students to examine national and local trends in training and organizational development and to prepare for ongoing professional growth in the context of contemporary issues in the field. Recommended prerequisites: ELP 429/529 plus two other courses in the series.

ELP 432/532
Training Methods (3)

Focuses on instructional strategies and effective delivery of training programs necessary for enhancing adult learning and professional development. Students will examine individual learning preferences and multiple types of active pedagogy for increasing transfer of learning. In addition, various techniques and tools for linking learning outcomes with organizational goals will be addressed. Prerequisite: ELP 429/529.

ELP 434/534
Leadership of the Training Function (3)
Focuses upon research-based, practical approaches for leading, managing, and evaluating the training and development function in organizations. It explores the role of training and development in achieving individual and organizational goals, as well as strategies and resources used in effective personnel development. Students analyze how to: develop, manage and evaluate the training function; identify strategies and resources for effective training management; and diagnose how the organization's culture and needs affect the selection and success of training management efforts. Prerequisite: ELP 429/529.

ELP 435/535
Organization Transformation through Training and Development (3)
Designed for managers of the training and development function in organizations, this course focuses on the role of training and development in organization transformation, improvement, and change. The course provides opportunities to bring real workplace examples into the classroom and to apply organization development and systems theory in the development strategies for organization improvement through the training and development function. Prerequisite: ELP 429/529.

ELP 444/544
Instructional Design for Online Based Training (3)
Examine the adult learning instructional strategies, interactive techniques, information architecture, and user-interface design principles used in online training. Analyze audience learning and experience preferences, training requirements, and content objectives and use that information to choose appropriate online training strategies and methods.  

ELP 445/545
Building Online Training (4)
Examine development methodologies/processes, principles of task identification, risk mitigation, technical architecture, creative tools, and project management strategies used in building online training courses. Apply learning theory and project management principles to development of online trainings.  

ELP 446/556
Early Childhood Education: Relationships with Home and Society (3)

Considers the sociology of families and communities in the development of cooperative relationships with programs for young children.

ELP 447/547
Administration of Early Childhood Programs (3)
Examines theory and practice informing the administration/leadership of early childhood programs to include: 1) organizational configurations, 2) leadership and the dynamics of the work group, 3) developmentally appropriate curriculum, 4) interaction with families of young children, and 5) significance of poverty, race, and gender for such programs.

ELP 448U
Introduction to Global Political Ecology (4)
This course surveys a broad range of topics at the convergence of thinking about ecology and globalization. Students examine how the emergence of a global economy along with its technological, financial, and institutional developments has impacted life for both human and non-human communities. To apply these concepts and personalize the historical material, the focus is on various "commodities" with which we interact, such as salmon, tomatoes, and oil. As a foil to the global aspect, this course emphasizes the relocalization approach and examine ways in which local communities are generating alternatives to those aspects of globalization that are seen to be unjust, disempowering, and even eco-cidal.

ELP 450U
Introduction to Leadership for Sustainability
This multi-media seminar course reviews, analyzes and critiques the history, politics and rhetoric of sustainability. Students are exposed to a variety of whole systems design in sustainability as well as examples from the grassroots including the growing conservation economy in the Pacific Northwest, and the issue of indigenous cultures and sustainability. Students apply these concepts in real life by developing a wildest dream project in sustainability and outlining social, natural and economic capital needed to implement it.

ELP 451/551
Social Foundations of Education (4)
Study of sociological theories that illuminate the effects of education on individuals and society. Problem areas in race, class, and gender are explored in the process of examining theories of socialization, certification, allocation, and legitimation and their application to historical and current educational situations.

ELP 452/552
History of Education (3)
A general review of the growth and development of education in relation to the civilization of the times; emphasis is placed upon the development of educational theories at various points in history.

ELP 453/553
History of American Education (4)
The historical development of the American educational system, from European backgrounds and colonial beginnings to the present time.

ELP 454/554
Philosophy of Education (4)
Study and comparison of the philosophical bases of educational ideas and of the educational implications of philosophical thought. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement.

ELP 455/555
Gender and Education (4)
Explores the significance of gender in educational work. The focus will be on the history of gender arrangements in educational organizations and the formation of gender roles in contemporary American society, particularly in the family, schools, and the economy. Students will examine differential socialization of males and females, ongoing practices in educational organizations that are gender-related and/or gender biased and the convergence of gender, race, and class in educational organizations. This course is cross-listed as WS 455, may only be taken once for credit. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement.

ELP 456/556
The Urban School and "at Risk" Status (4)
Draws upon theory, research, and practice for the examination of the conditions of being "at-risk" in urban schools. Explores the family, community, and school environments and their relationships in the hindrance of development of children and youth leading to their "at-risk" status. This course is cross-listed with Urban Studies. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement.

ELP 457/557
Cultural Pluralism and Urban Education (4)
This course is designed to explore the process of education policy development and implementation in culturally diverse, urban environments. The course is organized around several cultural pluralism perspectives; among the topics to be explored are the issues of socialization of the child, governmental operations, educational administration, teacher preparation and curriculum design. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement.

ELP 465/565
ELL School Community Relations (3)
Learn how to work with families to overcome barriers to setting-up support systems in and out of school. Access appropriate community resources that can be critical for ensuring classroom success with ELL students. Gain understanding about other culture's orientation to education and school. Learn strategies to build bridges between home, school, and the community.

ELP 466/566
Impact of Language and Culture in the Classroom (3)
Learn the importance of intercultural communication in working with children from a wide range of cultures in today's classroom. Survey the cultural, linguistic, educational, and ethical issues present in all classrooms today. Study the sociological and language issues and immigration history. Learn how to identify and appreciate cultural factors that affect social adjustment and learning.

ELP 467/567
ESL/Bilingual Program Design and Model (3)
Exemplary schools provide second language learners with a rich intellectual diet, not a remedial or basic skills curriculum. They expect all students to achieve high standards in literacy and other academic areas. Learn how these schools combine their understandings and apply the knowledge of local, state, and federal laws and policies along with pedagogical considerations to create effective programs. Participants will examine a variety of local, regional, and national program models for ESL and Bilingual instruction. This will create opportunities to develop expertise in assessing the critical components of programs serving pre-school through adults.

ELP 501
Theory and Practice of Sustainability (1-4)
This course offers a great addition to LSE core curriculum content by showing the application of theories and models in sustainability design, social justice, and bio-cultural diversity. Through lectures and hands-on workshops with and from about 3-5 visiting scholars each term, we explore real life examples of how these individuals and institutions have developed the vision and implemented that vision in various areas of sustainability. Invited visiting scholars are selected keeping in view the learning needs of LSE students as well as the diversity of fields and approaches, they represent.

ELP 503 LSE Thesis/ELP 506 LSE Culminating Project (2)
These courses are designed to help students define, develop and present a project or paper that demonstrates a satisfactory level of knowledge and skill related to their chosen LSE area of concentration. Students who have completed substantial amount of core courses take this course in three consecutive terms, usually fall, winter and spring quarters. Students need instructor's permission before enrolling in the course.

ELP 510
Introduction to Qualitative Methods (4)
This course is designed to familiarize students with the major qualitative modes of inquiry in education including ethnography, case studies, action research, grounded theory, historical resarch, and phenomenology.  Students will learn to differentiate between these research methodologies, and to identify stages of qualitative research, from design, conceptual framework, data collection, data analysis and finally writing.  Students will be taught how to become "good consumers" of educational qualitative research.  For those who work in higher education the course will clarify and give greater organization to analysis and assessment of qualitative studies in higher education.  For those who do not work in the field of higher education teh course endeavors to help students develop a tool that will help them convert theory and research findings into solid, progressive practice.  Finally, grading emphasis will be placed on completing analysis of qualitative research in higher education and participating in a conference style culminating experience.

ELP 510
Ecological Education in K-8 School (4)
Designed for the purpose of professional development for practicing K-12 principals and educators, this course researches principles of ecological education in K-8 schools through readings, class discussions, field study/observations, and curriculum development. In collaborative teams, participants revise, and revisit existing curriculum modules as well as develop curriculum to be used in K-12 classrooms.

ELP 510
Introduction to Service-Learning in Postsecondary Education
This course is an introduction to the fundamental principles and practices of service-learning in postsecondary education. Students will examine key concepts of service-learning, historical foundations of this approach, research trends and methodologies, and how service-learning relates to theories of adult learning and development. Other topics include an exploration of service-learning and civic engagement, along with an examination of race, class, gender, and other issues of power in service-learning. Students will be required to participate in a service-learning project that will serve both the community partner and provide practice in service-learning curriculum development.

ELP 510
Service-Learning in Educational Leadership and Policy
This course will focus on service-learning in the context of postsecondary educational institutions, their leadership, and policy. Students will explore the role of service-learning in different postsecondary institutions, from community colleges through graduate schools, and the varying ways in which service-learning is structured within those institutions through policy and organization. This course will also examine the challenges and opportunities of service-learning partnerships between academic institutions and community-based organizations, along with implications of these partnerships for students, clients, and social change. Students will be required to participate in a service-learning field project for this course.

ELP 510
Urban Education Farm: Food Policy, Curriculum Design, and Action! (1-4)
This course offers a facilitated learning experience in the theory and practice of developing and implementing theoretically-based, behaviorally driven curriculum for garden-based learning experiences that are tied to the Oregon state benchmarks. This course also develops standardized menu of garden-based learning curriculum that has been pilot tested for teachers and garden coordinators to choose from the Learning Gardens Project and the needs of individual students.

ELP 511, 512
Principles of Educational Research and Data Analysis I, II (4, 4)
Research paradigm; measurement and test characteristics; planning and evaluation; library resources; identifying research problems; planning research; types of research; research designs, central tendency, variability and relationships; sampling, sampling error, and hypothesis testing; crossbreaks; one, two, and multiple group, and multiple independent variable designs; computer applications; information systems. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 513
Advanced Research Designs and Data Analysis in Education (4)
Designs for multiple independent variables; equating designs for multigroups; designs for multiple dependent variables; follow-up procedures for multiple dependent variable designs; selected data collection methods, including questionnaires, interviews, observation, sociometry, and objective tests and scales; computer application in the use of selected designs. Prerequisite: ELP 512.

ELP 514
Educational Measurement and Assessment (4)
Minimum competency, norm-referenced, and criterion-referenced tests; classroom student assessment; characteristics and levels of measurement; reliability; validity; interpreting test scores; standardized tests; using performance standards; planning and constructing classroom selection; supply and performance tests; portfolio assessment; evaluating test items. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 515
Program Evaluation (4)
An examination of evaluation theory and approaches and their applications in educational settings. Emphasis is given to program evaluation and to understanding how the usefulness of evaluation results may be increased. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 516/616
Collaborative Ethnographic Research Methods (4)
Are there research methods that help us to gain knowledge, skills and worldviews that in turn help create a world that is livable, ecologically sustainable, socially just and bio-culturally diverse? Can research promote knowledge democracy, and give ownership to those whose knowledge it is and should own it. Methodologies covered are: different genres of qualitative methods, community-based planning and research, participatory action-research, Gaian participatory science, classical ethnography, auto-ethnography, ethnographic performance, life histories, feminist methodologies, and "dialogue circles."

ELP 517/617
Ecological and Cultural Foundations of Learning (4)
This course explores how we teach and learn ecologically and what constitutes ecological and cultural ways of knowing in environmental education, nature education, outdoors education, food and garden based education, place-based education and other such genres. This course is beyond simply justifying or advocating that our education should be grounded in ecological principles but explores the intersection of what Dr. Parajuli calls the "earthshed," "humanshed," and "learningshed." Building on works of David Abram, Jeannette Armstrong, Zenobia Barlow, Wendell Berry, Fritjof Capra, David Orr, Dilafruz Williams, Madhu Prakash, Greg Smith, David Sobel and others, this course engages in multi-sensory and interdisciplinary pedagogical inquiry.

ELP 519
Sustainability Education (4)
In order to build a robust theory and practice of sustainability education, this course covers local, national and global innovations in light of the UN decade for Education for Sustainability (2005-15). While critically assessing earlier traditions such as nature education, environmental education, outdoor education, place-based education, and ecological literacy; students are involved in developing curriculum and teacher preparation modules for K-12, higher education and or community organizations.

ELP 520
Developmental Perspectives on Adult Learning (4)
Explores professional applications of adult development theory and research to facilitating adult learning in a wide variety of contexts, including formal educational and training programs as well as general environments such as learning organizations. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement. Prerequisite: admission to a graduate program.

ELP 521
Adult Learning (4)
An examination of challenges facing those who plan, implement, and evaluate learning opportunities for adults; alternative approaches and designs. Issues reviewed from perspectives of educational program providers and adult learners. Relevant theory and research will be reviewed. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 522
Motivating Adult Learners (4)
An examination of the complex relationships between adult development, motivation, and learning. Attention is given to the intra- and interpersonal dynamics that motivate human behavior in general and adult learning and behavior within organizational contexts specifically. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 523
Assessing Adult Learning (4)
Introduction to the approaches, processes, and tools that can be used to assess adult learning. Emphasis is given to applications at the classroom and program levels and to practices that themselves contribute to adult learning. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 525
Student Services in Higher Education (4)
Provides an introduction to the professional field of student affairs within the context of colleges and universities, including its historical, philosophical, ethical, and theoretical foundations. Current and future issues for the profession are also critically examined. Course includes an additional concurrent 30-hour minimum field project requirement. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 526
Facilitating Student Success in Postsecondary Education (4)
Provides an introduction to theory and research related to factors and conditions that affect student success in postsecondary education and to assessment approaches and techniques in student services. Informed by theory, research, and practice, students develop an intervention proposal related to facilitating student success and a plan for assessing that intervention. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 527
Legal Issues in Higher Education (4)
Provides a general introduction to the law related to higher education and professional practice in colleges and universities. In addition to the substance of related law, the course explores how the law is applied to rules and policy and how ethical standards and principles impact that application. Course includes an additional concurrent 30-hour minimum field project requirement. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 528
Leadership in Postsecondary Education (4)
Examines emerging conceptualizations and forms of leadership and leadership development in postsecondary education. Ethical and value bases of leadership inform a focus on the creation of organizational and social change within postsecondary settings. Course emphasizes nonhierarchical models of leadership that value diversity and involve collaborative relationships and collective action. Application of leadership development issues within a variety of educational and social service organizations are explored. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement.

ELP 533
Planning and Budgeting in Postsecondary Education (4)
Provides an introduction to the planning and budgeting processes used in colleges and universities. Major emphasis is placed on key concepts, planning models, and applications to institutional cases. Strategies for linking planning and budgeting function will be explored. Students will examine and use various planning and budgeting tools and techniques. Budget reduction and the connection between planning and assessment will be examined. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 536
Postsecondary Curriculum (4)
Provides an introduction to the field of curriculum or program design for adult learners and introduces students to a process of program planning and development. Curriculum development or design is viewed as both a technical and political process. It also provides a historical and philosophical perspective on postsecondary curriculum, with attention given to review and analysis of current practices and issues, including life-long and collaborative learning. A comprehensive program planning model will be examined. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 537
Policy and Governance in Postsecondary Education (4)
An examination of theory and research that relates to how policy is formulated and implemented in postsecondary environments. The course focuses on the policy and governance role of faculty, administrators, and trustees at the single college or university level, and state and federal roles in postsecondary policy and governance. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 538
Contemporary Issues in Postsecondary Education (4)
The course is designed to provide students with an introduction to the study of postsecondary education using as the vehicle a focus on some of the more pressing issues currently facing postsecondary education. The course is designed to increase the capacity for the identification and analyses of issues and the development of positions relative to the issue. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 541
The Community College (4)
An introduction to the two-year college in the United States, with an emphasis on the public community college with a comprehensive educational program. Topics include: transfer studies; career education; general education; community services; basic skills education; and student development services. The purpose of the course is to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge relative to the history, philosophy, students, staff, services, and patterns of organization of the public community college.

ELP 542
Introduction to Service-Learning: Theoretical and Pedagogical Perspectives in Postsecondary Education (4)
Fundamental principles and practices of service-learning in postsecondary education. Service-learning pedagogy, its relationship to adult development, historical foundations in educational institutions, and civic education. Resources and organizations, and issues of race, class, gender, and power in service-learning. Required participation in a service-learning project provides practice in application of theories. 

ELP 543
Service-Learning and Community Based Learning in Postsecondary Educational Leadership and Policy: Domestic Issues (4) 
Service-learning in postsecondary educational institutions, their leadership, and policy. Role, organization, and policy of service-learning in different postsecondary institutions, from community colleges through graduate schools, and the varying ways in which service-learning is structured, researched, and assessed. Practical and theoretical concerns in an applied service-learning experience in the metro area. Challenges and opportunities of partnerships between academic institutions and community-based organizations. Implications of service-learning for students, faculty, partners, and the community in the context of civic engagement, social justice, and social change.

ELP 548
Global Political Ecology (4)
In order to grasp the emerging discipline of political ecology, we discuss the following: the impact of a globalized economy on human and non-human communities; the relationship between poverty, global inequity and environmental degradation, the distribution of resource use and conflicts between the global North and global South, the ecological processes, earth democracy and the relationship of these issues in our personal lives. Students apply these concepts in real life through a multi-media study and presentation of a chosen commodity in terms of its production, distribution and consumption.

 

ELP 550
Leadership for Sustainability (4)
This multi-media seminar course reviews, analyzes and critiques the history, politics and rhetoric of sustainability. Four key themes are covered within the rubric of leadership for sustainability: whole systems design in sustainability, the issue of "fairness in a fragile earth" surrounding the Johannesburg summit of 2002, the growing conservation economy in the Pacific Northwest, and the issue of indigenous cultures and sustainability. Students apply these concepts in real life by developing a wildest dream project in sustainability and outlining social, natural and economic capital needed to implement it.

ELP 558
Educational Leadership (4)
Analysis of leadership theories, skills, and techniques as applied to the organization and administration of public education. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 560
Supervision and Evaluation of Instruction (4)
The role of the supervisor in keeping education geared to the changing demands of society; theories of leadership; group processes and individual conference techniques; action research and related approaches to curriculum change; analysis of concrete supervisory problems.

ELP 561
Staff Development: Planning, Implementation, and Evaluation (4)
Staff development goals; characteristics of staff development programs; establishing a staff development organization; policy and decision-making; identifying and responding to the concerns of participants; assessing needs; planning and implementation of specific programs; networking; formal and informal methods of evaluation; models for staff development; program evaluation; management information systems; evaluating instructional effectiveness. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 562
School and Community Relations (4)
An intensive examination of the school and its environment. Major emphasis is on the linking mechanisms utilized by the school in interacting with parents, citizens, and special interest groups. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 563
Human Relations in Educational Organizations (4)
Issues and perspectives in group processes; models for studying groups; principles of group dynamics; human relations within educational organizations; strategies for group problem-solving and conflict management; application of group dynamics to leadership, communication, and decision-making within educational organizations; evaluating processes and production of educational groups. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 564
Administration of Curriculum (4)
Provides a broad and critical understanding of curricular matters that are relevant and important to administrators: 1) decision making about the choice of content; 2) politics of curriculum development; 3) implementation and monitoring of curriculum at building site; 4) testing and alignment of curriculum; and 5) evaluation of curriculum implementation. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 568
Educational Organization and Administration (4)
Examination of the role, functions, and responsibilities of the educational leaders and administrators; study of administrative and organizational theory and its application to the operation of educational programs and organizations in various settings, including school districts, higher education and educational divisions in private sector organizations. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

ELP 569
Introduction to Educational Administration (4)
Introductory course required of applicants to the Initial Administrator certificate program. Considers educational, social, political, economic, organizational, and cultural forces shaping U.S. public schools and their administration. Course includes an additional, concurrent 30 hour minimum field project requirement.

ELP 570
Human Relations and Educational Foundations (4)
Explores the historical, social, philosophical, and organizational foundations of public education. Examines the dynamics of human relationships, leadership, and community building in schools and educational settings. Analyzes public education goals and decision-making processes for achieving these goals. Prerequisites: admission to Initial Administrator program; ELP 569.

ELP 571
Teaching, Learning, and Curriculum (4)
Examines the complex relationships between staff evaluation, individual professional development, staff development, and effective teaching, learning, and curriculum. Students will examine those factors which make supervision and evaluation really work, i.e., contribute to the larger purpose of building an environment where teachers can deliver their best and children can learn most. Prerequisite: ELP 570.

ELP 572
Human Resource Development and Organizational Change (4)
Examines how the relationships between people and organizational structures, policies, and processes influence school culture and change efforts. Studies how school leaders secure and manage resources to improve teaching and learning for all within the school community. Prerequisite: ELP 571.

ELP 576
Education, Community, and Society (4)
A review of sociological theories and research that illuminates the social and economic functions of education in modern society, with special emphasis placed on application of the role of the practicing school administrator as instructional leader and manager. Race, class, gender, and differing ability levels are explored in the process of examining theories of socialization, certification, allocation, and legitimation and their application to historical and current educational situations, particularly in schools and school districts. 30-hours of field-based experiences are used to connect the theories and research covered in class to the practice of schooling and the work of a school administrator. Prerequisite: admission to Continuing Administrator licensure program or permission of instructor.

ELP 577
District and School Staff Supervision and Evaluation (4)
Advanced course in alternative approaches to district and school staff supervision and evaluation in an era of school reform, heightened accountability, and emerging state and national standards. Topics to be covered are dealing with the at-risk and incompetent staff and new directions in teacher evaluation. 30-hours of field-based experiences are used to connect the theories and research covered in class to the practice of schooling and the work of a school administrator. Prerequisite: admission to Continuing Administrator licensure program or permission of instructor.

ELP 578
Communication & Conflict Management in Educational Organizations (4)
Issues of communication within educational organizations and between educational organizations and various audiences. Definitions of conflict and models for peaceful resolution/management of conflict within educational organizations and with various other individuals and organizations. Attention to world view, cultural styles, positions, underlying needs, bargaining, reforming, and finding common ground. Strategies for group problem-solving, conflict management including collective bargaining and contract management, and community-building. 30 hours of field-based experiences are used to connect the theories and research covered in class to the practice of schooling and the work of a school administrator. Prerequisite: admission to Continuing Administrator licensure program or permission of instructor.

ELP 579
Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment Leadership (4)
An examination of standards-based reform, curriculum and instructional models, assessment models, school improvement strategies, and educational change theories. Emphasis is given to understanding how assessment information can be used to improve student learning and overall school performance within the context of Oregon's state reform framework. 30 hours of field based experiences are used to connect the theories and research covered in class to the practice of schooling and the work of a school administrator. Prerequisite: admission to Continuing Administrator licensure program or permission of instructor.

ELP 580
District Policy, Operations, Facilities, and Finance (4)
The role of the district superintendent and local school boards in planning, management, evaluation, and improvement of policies and programs related to school operations, personnel, facilities, and finance to meet school district needs. Examines state and federal laws, regulations, and the roles of ODE and the legislature in governing Oregon school finance, school budgeting, and school facilities. 30 hours of field-based experiences are used to connect the theories and research covered in class to the practice of schooling and the work of a school administrator. Prerequisite: admission to Continuing Administrator licensure program or permission of instructor.

ELP 581
U.S. and Oregon School Law and Policy (4)
Examines federal and Oregon school law governing educational practice and policy at the school and district levels; the relationships among these factors and their implications for effective communication with educational stakeholders, instruction and student learning, and effective organizational management of schools. 30 hours of field-based experiences are used to connect the theories and research covered in class to the practice of schooling and the work of a school administrator. Prerequisite: admission to Continuing Administrator licensure program or permission of instructor.

ELP 594
School Law (4)
Critical analysis of the legal framework governing school law in the United States, with emphasis on contemporary legal problems of education. Implications of landmark and current court decisions. Prerequisite: graduate standing.