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Fall 2012 Chiron Studies Courses

Chiron Studies is offering the following courses during the Fall 2012 term. They are all IST (Interdisciplinary Studies) 199 classes. Register for Chiron Studies Courses as you would any other official university course. See the FAQ at the top of this page if you have more questions about Chiron Studies, or write to chironstudies@pdx.edu. We hope that you will take one or more of our classes and consider proposing a course for a future term.

Harajuku Cool (4 credits)

Tuesdays & Thursdays 14:00-15:50     Instructor: Emily Connelly     CRN: 15115

Vampires, punks, dancing Elvises, and living dolls: welcome to Harajuku. "Harajuku style," as it is sometimes branded outside of Japan, is one of the largest exports from the current Japanese popular culture boom. Commonly characterized by outsiders for bright, clashing colors, a bubblegum punk sensibility, and its "outrageous" excesses, this moniker usually refers to a pastiche of not one, but many extraordinary youth cultural movements maintaining a visible public profile in the Tokyo neighborhood, Harajuku. In this class, we will explore this culture through film, television, magazines, manga, and more.

 

Radical Home Economics (4 Credits)

Thursdays 17:30-21:10     Instructor: Jared Rhea     CRN: 15116

What is Home? Who is the economy for? This course begins with seemingly simple questions; we will attempt to unravel the many answers. Home Economics (also referred to as Consumer Sciences) was initially conceived of as a means of bringing women into the academy and of training young women in a skill set that many believed would make them better homemakers. In an age where many women now seek paid work outside of the home, where traditional skills once held by women and men are being lost, replaced by consumer products or performed by service professionals, can reclaiming those skills through the discipline of Home Economics become a means of living more sustainability? This course will be an attempt to get to the root of Home Economics, interrogate the influence of consumerism in U.S. American culture, and to experiment with ways of gaining skills that can allow us to live more sustainably in accordance with our individual and collective values.