Search Google Appliance


Doug Deur

Dr. Douglas Deur

Associate Research Professor
PhD, Louisiana State University

deur@pdx.edu

Dr. Deur's research interests include cultural and political ecology, ethnobiology, cultural landscapes, contested spaces, applied research, cultural perspectives on natural resource management and restoration, resident communities’ interests in national parks and protected areas, ethnohistory, and Northwestern North America.

Dr. Deur's areas of focus include contested spaces and resources, such as the study of Native American communities’ responses to the effects of contemporary development on places or resources of unique cultural significance. As part of this work he has been providing training for Native American and Native Alaskan communities on how to document places of cultural significance as those communities seek to articulate their concerns regarding the effects of tourism, mining and energy development within their traditional territories. He also provides research support to the National Park Service throughout the western United States relating to Native American and Alaska Native interests in park lands, in support of NAGPRA repatriation efforts, Traditional Cultural Property studies, dispute resolution efforts relating to resource access, and other management challenges. He also directs ethnobotanical studies for tribes and agencies across the West.

Dr. Deur’s recent publications include a special section of the journal Human Ecology, co-edited with Dr. Thomas Thornton (PSU & Oxford), addressing traditional management of salmon, clam beds and other marine resources among the Kwakwaka'wakw and Tlingit - co-authored with Chief Kwaxistalla Adam Dick, Kim Recalma-Clutesi, Dr. Nancy Turner, and Herman Kitka Sr. Other recent publications include articles in BC Studies on traditional plant management practices, and on colonial displacement of Northwest Coast indigenous peoples from traditional estuarine root gardens,  His Pacific Northwest Foraging – a popular guidebook to edible plants of the Northwest – has recently appeared on the New York Times Best Sellers List.

Select Publications: