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Course Descriptions

All online classes are capped at 35. Face-to-face classes are capped at 100 for 100-level courses, 50 or 75 for 300-level courses, 20+10 for 400/500-level courses, and 20 for 500-level courses. Courses marked with a * are not offered every year.

The following list of courses is also available in the PSU Bulletin.

Anth 101 INTRODUCTION TO BIOLOGICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
The biological side of anthropology: primate paleontology, human evolution, modern human variation, and primate behavior.

Anth 102 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY (4)
The study of ancient cultures of the world. Introduction to the theories and techniques of archaeological investigation.

Anth 103 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL/CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
Study of modern and recent societies in cross cultural perspective. Focus on methods for understanding social and cultural differences and similarities.

*Anth 300 THE MODERN WORLD IN ANTHROPOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE (4)
Examination of anthropological approaches to cultural diversity in a global context. Include cultural contact between the Fourth World and the industrialized world; health, nutrition, and poverty in different world areas; ecocide and ethnocide; political movements in the Fourth World; racism; and sexism.

Anth 301 CULTURE AND ETHNOGRAPHY (4)
Cultural diversity and contemporary social issues examined through a series of ethnographic studies that highlight the methodology and efficacy of ethnographic research. Topics may include, but will not be limited to, issues of identity formation, gender, political economy, and transnational culture flows.

Anth 304 SOCIAL THEORY (4)
Examines social organization at various levels, from the family on up to the global economy. Theoretical perspectives span classic social theory, the ethnographic tradition, and hybrid approaches used by present-day anthropologists. Topics include power, identity, agency, social change, and globalization, with an emphasis on understanding contemporary social issues in cross-cultural perspective. Designed for anthropology majors and minors. Note: This course is not approved for distribution credits. Recommended prerequisite: Anth 103.

Anth 305 CULTURE THEORY (4)
Explores the historical development of the concept of culture within anthropology and examines how this concept and the theories based on it have shaped both fieldwork practices and production of ethnographic texts. Designed for anthropology majors and minors. Note: This course is not approved for distribution credits. Recommended prerequisite: Anth 103.

*Anth 311 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF LATIN AMERICA (4)
Introduction to the peoples and cultures of Latin America, including Mexico, Central and South America, and the Caribbean. Course topics include religion, ecology, race and ethnicity, gender, urbanization, conflict, and social change.

*Anth 312 SOUTHEAST ASIAN SOCIETIES AND CULTURES (4)
Introduction to the societies and cultures of Southeast Asia, the area encompassed today by the nations of Burma (Myanmar), Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Indonesia, and the Philippines. Course topics explore the religious and cultural diversity of the area, as well as historical and cultural themes that traverse this region. Recommended prerequisite: Anth 103.

*Anth 313 INDIAN WHITE RELATIONS (4)
Consideration of North Americans since 1500: Problems of social and cultural survival and change, as well as changing governmental policies, population, non-Indian conceptions of "The Indian."

*Anth 314 NATIVE AMERICANS (4)
Ethnographic survey of North American Indian cultures from simple hunter gatherers to complex empires illustrating the patterns of adaptations to the variety of landscapes and historical processes.

*Anth 315 AMERICAN CULTURE (4)
Central beliefs and core values of modern American society are examined from an anthropological perspective. Considers: value of constructs such as individualism and conformity; creation of public images; kinship and friendship; privacy; schools and neighborhoods; and conflicts involving ethnicity, social class, and gender. Questions the role of culture in our own lives, thereby gaining a greater understanding of social experience and of the concept of culture.

*Anth 317 PEOPLES AND CULTURES OF SOUTH ASIA (4)
Introduction to the peoples and cultures of South Asia, the area encompassed by India, Pakistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bangladesh, Butan and the Maldive Islands. Topics include cultural diversity, religious traditions, the caste system, class and gender hierarchies, and social change.

*Anth 318 ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE (4)
Explores the contemporary experiences of Asian immigrants to the United States, focusing on issues of migration, family adjustments, community formations, and identity constructions among diverse groups of Asians including Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, Vietnamese, South Asians, and others. Recommended prerequisite: students are strongly encouraged to complete Anth 103.

*Anth 319 TRADITIONAL CULTURES OF AFRICA (4)
A survey of the culture history and characteristics of the traditional (before Western influence) cultures of African peoples.

*Anth 320 NATIVE AMERICANS OF THE NORTHWEST COAST (4)
Native Americans of the Pacific Northwest coast are among the most affluent, diverse, and complex hunting-gathering peoples in the world. This course examines the unity and diversity of these cultures from Alaska to the Oregon-California border by tracing their historical evolution and responses to contemporary problems. Topics include: subsistence economies and resource tenure, social identity, art, ceremonial and spiritual life, culture change and revitalization, and modern indigenous-state relations. Recommended prerequisite: Anth 103, 313, or 314.

*Anth 325 CULTURE, HEALTH, AND HEALING (4)
Introduction to the field of medical anthropology. Biocultural aspects of disease and healing. Comparison of healers and healing professions in Western and non-Western societies. Interactions among culture, social relations, environment, and health. Topics include healers and healing roles, ethnomedicine and medical pluralism, clinical medical anthropology, and nutritional anthropology.

*Anth 330 ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOLKLORE (4)
Review of folklore - including legend, folktales, music and dance - and its role in society. Emphasis will be on the study of folklore by anthropologists in both western and non-western contexts. Explores how folklore can reveal social relations, conflict and resistance, social change and gender relations.

*Anth 333 ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD (4)
Explores biological and cultural aspects of past and present human food systems. Topics include nutrition, the cultural significance of food, domestication of plants and animals, archaeological records fo competitive feasting, global movement of foods during the colonial period, new revolutions in food technology, the politics and economics of contemporary food systems, and eating disorders such as obesity, anorexia, and bulimia.

*Anth 335 ANTHROPOLOGY OF SPACE AND PLACE (4)
Space and place are foundational to human cognition, emotion, and experience, and yet we often take them for granted. This course examines the origins, development and contemporary variation of human senses of space, place, and environment in a variety of cultural settings around the world. Recommended prerequisite: Anth 102 or 103.

*Anth 345 PRACTICING ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
Introduction to applied anthropology as a tool to address real world problems related to development, environment, human health, cultural resource management, conflict, and more. Includes creation of a personalized career plan which will assist in the transition from education to profession following the completion of an undergraduate degree in anthropology. Expected preparation: Anth 101, 102, 304, and 305.

Anth 350 ARCHAEOLOGICAL METHOD AND THEORY (4)
A survey of current techniques and conceptual models applied in the discovery and analysis of archaeological materials. The fundamentals of archaeological research design, field survey, excavation, dating, cultural reconstruction, and the application of interdisciplinary studies. Recommended prerequisite: Anth 102.

*Anth 355 HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE ORIGINS OF THE MODERN PACIFIC NORTHWEST (4)
Explores the origins of the modern Pacific Northwest from fur-trade/indigenous contacts to the present using theories and methods of historical archaeology in North America and elsewhere. Topics include heritage, history, and interpretation; the archaeology of the fur trade; the industrial revolution and industrial archaeology; slavery and inequality; and military sites archaeology.  Expected preparation: Anth 350.

*Anth 357: ARCHAEOLOGY IN POPULAR CULTURE
Study relationships between archaeology, archaeology in popular culture, and modern society. Build knowledge of science in archaeology through analysis of archaeological representations in popular culture (e.g. films, television).

*Anth 361 THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF EUROPE (4)
Methods and results of the study of ancient cultures of Europe from the earliest traces until the advent of written records. Expected preparation: Anth 350.

*Anth 362 AFRICAN PREHISTORY (4)
Methods, sources of evidence, and the results of the study of prehistoric cultures of Africa from the earliest traces until the first written records; it includes human origins (physical and cultural evolution), the earliest civilization, peopling of Africa, migrations, earliest settlements, origins of agriculture and metallurgy. This is the same course as BSt 362 and may be taken only once for credit.

Anth 363 EGYPTIAN ARCHAEOLOGY: FROM EARLIEST PEOPLES TO THE PYRAMID AGE (4)
A survey of the archaeological record of Egypt beginning with the earliest evidence of human occupation to the Pyramid era, with an emphasis on the period from 6000 BCE to the end of the Old Kingdom period (ca 2000 BCE). Lectures and readings will focus on how archaeological materials are used to reconstruct events in Egypt’s past.

*Anth 364 THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST (4)
A survey of the ancient cultures and societies of northwestern North America from its earliest peoples to the arrival of Europeans. Expected preparation: Anth 350.

Anth 365 THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF NORTH AMERICA (4)
A survey of the ancient cultures and societies of North America north of Mexico, from the first ancient migrant populations and early hunter-gatherers to the complex agricultural societies encountered by 15th and 16th century European explorers. Expected preparation: Anth 350.

*Anth 366 THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF MESOAMERICA (4)
Early cultures of Mesoamerica with an emphasis on the domestication of plants and animals and the development of civilization, focusing on the Maya and Highland Mexico. Expected preparation: Anth 350.

*Anth 367 THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF EAST ASIA (4)
The archaeology of China, Japan, and Korea from about 1 million years ago to the establishment of the Yamato State in Japan. Focuses on developments during the past 18,000 years, including the domestication of plants and animals, the spread of agriculture, and the development of civilization and regional states. Expected preparation: Anth 350.

*Anth 368 THE ARCHAEOLOGY OF OCEANIA (4)
Reviews issues related to the peopling of Australia about 40,000 years ago, and subsequent voyaging and colonization of all parts of the South Pacific. Examines prehistoric cultural developments in Hawaii, New Zealand, Easter Island, and island groups in Micronesia. Examines evidence of human modification of island ecosystems. Expected preparation: Anth 350.

Anth 370 PALEOANTHROPOLOGY (5)
Method and theory in paleoanthropology. A study of hominoid and human evolution from the Miocene to modern times. Emphasis will be placed on the fossil record and the interactions between biology and culture in the evolution of the human species. Four hours lecture and one biweekly laboratory. Recommended prerequisite: Anth 101. Corequisite: Anth 370L.

Anth 372 HUMAN VARIABILITY (4)
The causes and significance of biological variation in contemporary human populations-genetic, environmental and cultural factors. Recommended prerequisite: Anth 101.

*Anth 373 PRIMATE ECOLOGY AND BEHAVIOR (4)
Study of origins, diversity, ecology, behavior, and conservation of living non-human primates. Primate ecology and behavior are explored from a comparative and evolutionary perspective. Emphasis is on primates in natural habitats rather than in captive settings, spanning apes, monkeys, and prosimians. Recommended prerequisite: Anth 101.

*Anth 379 PRACTICING FORENSIC SCIENCE (4)
Survey of topics in forensic science: DNA, drug chemistry, toxicology, firearms, and latent prints. Focus on forensic anthropology and taphonomy, including assessment of age, sex, population-based skeletal variation, and effects of peri-/post-mortem environmental processes on forensic investigation. Course clarifies popular media misinformation with fact-based overview of real forensic analysis. Prerequisites: Anth 101 or permission of instructor.

Anth 399 SPECIAL STUDIES (Credit to be arranged.)

Anth 401/501 RESEARCH (Credit to be arranged.) Consent of instructor.

Anth 404/504 COOPERATIVE EDUCATION/ INTERNSHIP (Credit to be arranged.)

Anth 405/505 READING AND CONFERENCE (Credit to be arranged.) Consent of instructor.

Anth 407/507 SEMINAR (Credit to be arranged.) Consent of instructor.

Anth 409/509 PRACTICUM (Credit to be arranged.) Consent of instructor.

Anth 410/510 SELECTED TOPICS (Credit to be arranged.) Consent of instructor.

Anth 412/512 RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
Methods and techniques of research involving primary contacts with people, institutions and communities. The initiating and developing of projects designed to produce data for basic ethnographic, as well as applied, anthropological research. Recommended prerequisite: 12 credits in anthropology (Anth 304,305 strongly recommended).

*Anth 414/514 CULTURE AND ECOLOGY (4)
A critical analysis of the interrelations of culture, social structure, and human ecology. Social organization as influenced by characteristic patterns of resource exploitation. The uses of natural environment from the viewpoint of the members of societies. Recommended prerequisites: Anth 304, 305.

Anth 415/515 APPLIED ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
The application of anthropological knowledge to various kinds of projects and action programs in which cultural factors are critical elements. An examination of problems produced by rapid technological, social and cultural change, conflicts of values, and unequal access to resources in multi ethnic societies and "developing" nations; research leading to possible solutions is considered. Recommended prerequisite: 8 credits in anthropology (Anth 304, 305 strongly recommended).

*Anth 416/516 URBAN ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
Cross cultural examination of urban phenomena including: variability in cultural and institutional patterning of cities, acculturation processes affecting urban populations, migration and social accommodation of rural and tribal peoples to urban settings, and the varieties of new subcultures that emerge in urban society. Recommended prerequisite: 8 credits in sociocultural anthropology or allied social science (Anth 304, 305 strongly recommended).

*Anth 417/517 ADVANCED TOPICS IN NATIVE AMERICAN STUDIES (4)
In-depth examination of a current scholarly topic in the anthropology of native North America, especially in relation to colonialism and native resistance. Course will cover appropriate theory, as well as ethnographic and ethnohistorical materials. Recommended prerequisites: Anth 313 and 314 or two courses on Native Americans in any department.

*Anth 418/518 ENVIRONMENTAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
What can anthropology teach us about contemporary environmental problems? Emphasizing key issues of environmental change, adaptation, conservation and sustainability, biocultural diversity, resilience, political ecology, and environmental justice, this course examines how the cross-cultural study of human-environmental relations can improve our understanding of contemporary environmental problems and their solutions. Recommended prerequisites: Anth 102, 103, 301 or 304, 414/514.

*Anth 422/522 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN INDIAN POLICY (4)
An examination of current federal, state, and tribal law and policy pertaining to Indian affairs, including tribal government organization, government-to-government relations, economic development, natural and cultural resource management, health care, welfare, and education. Both reservation communities and the Portland metropolitan Indian community are considered. Student research is based on reading, field trips, and interviews with tribal officials and other policy professionals. Recommended prerequisites: Anth 313, 314.

*Anth 425/525 PERSPECTIVES IN MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
Examination of critical, interpretive, and ecological perspectives in medical anthropology. Anthropological study of practice of biomedicine in the United States, and response to global diseases, including AIDS. Topics include the new medical technologies, social meanings of the body, bioethics, and the medicalization of social problems. Recommended prerequisite: Anth 325 or 8 credits of sociocultural anthropology (Anth 304, 305 strongly recommended. Anth 101 helpful).

*Anth 426/526 TRANSNATIONALISM AND MIGRATION (4)
In-depth exploration of globalization, transnationalism, and migration. Topics include colonialism and the history of world connections, the global economic system, cultural imperialism, nationalism and identity, migration, refugees, tourism, and the commodification of local cultures. Recommended prerequisite: 8 credits in socio-cultural anthropology (Anth 304, 305 strongly recommended.)

*Anth 428/528 POLITICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
Survey of major anthropological approaches to politics and power. Coverage includes structural functionalism, evolutionism, action theory, structuralism, political economy, and post structuralism. Ethnographic cases include both primitive politics and contemporary ethnic, class, and gender struggles in heterogeneous societies. Recommended prerequisites: 8 credits sociocultural anthropology (Anth 304, 305 strongly recommended).

*Anth 430/530 MYTH, RITUAL, AND SYMBOL (4)
A critical examination of both classic and recent anthropological theories in the cross cultural study of symbolic forms. Recommended prerequisite: 8 credits in sociocultural anthropology (Anth 304, 305 strongly recommended).

*Anth 431/531 ADVANCED TOPICS IN LATIN AMERICA (4)
In-depth exploration of a current topic in Latin American anthropology, especially in relation to the study of social change. Course materials will cover both theory and ethnography. Recommended prerequisite: either Anth 311 or two courses related to Latin America.

*Anth 432/532 GENDER IN CROSS-CULTURAL PERSPECTIVE (4)
A cross cultural examination of sex roles and gender beliefs including political, social, economic, and ideological aspects of the position of the sexes. Recommended prerequisites: upper division standing and at least one basic course in sociocultural anthropology (Anth 103, 304, or 305).

Anth 435/535 VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
Examination of visual representation and visual research in Sociocultural Anthropology with a focus on photographic images, ethnographic films, and mass media. Recommended prerequisites: 8 credits of sociocultural anthropology (Anth 304, 305 strongly recommended). Upper-division standing required.

*Anth 446/546 CHINESE CULTURE AND SOCIETY (4)
Examines recent issues in contemporary Chinese culture and society including rural and urban transformations, minority representations, gender shifts, religious and resistance movements and other trends. Most years will focus on PRC but may also include Hong Kong and Taiwan.
Recommended prerequisite: 8 credits in sociocultural anthropology (Anth 304 and 305 strongly recommended).

*Anth 447/547 ADVANCED TOPICS IN SOUTH ASIAN ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
In-depth exploration of a current topic in South Asian anthropology, especially in relation to social change, nationalism and conflict, colonialism, or modernization. Course materials will cover both theory and ethnography. Recommended prerequisite: Either Anth 317 or two related courses in Asian studies (Anth 304, 305 strongly recommended.)

*Anth 451/551 HISTORY OF ARCHAEOLOGY (4)
A chronological survey of developments in the field of archaeological inquiry: major schools of thoughts, innovations in method and theory, key personalities and their contributions. Also offered for graduate-level credit as Anth 551 and may be taken only once for credit. Prerequisites: Anth 350. Graduate standing or instructor permission for 500-level course. 

*Anth 452/552 ARCHAEOLOGICAL LAB METHODS (4)
The theory and practice of contemporary archaeological field investigation-research design, survey and reconnaissance, site excavation, sampling and recording techniques, cultural resource management. Also offered for graduate-level credit as Anth 553 and may be taken only once for credit. Prerequisites: Anth 350. Graduate standing or instructor permission for 500-level course.

*Anth 453/553 ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD METHODS (4)
The theory and practice of contemporary archaeological field investigation research design, survey and reconnaissance, site excavation, sampling and recording techniques, cultural resource management. Prerequisites: Anth 350. Graduate standing or instructor permission for 500-level course.

Anth 454/554 ARCHAEOLOGICAL FIELD SCHOOL (6)
Scientific excavation of archaeological sites or reconnaissance, survey and mapping of sites during a summer field project. Approximately 40 hours of field work per week, with a week of laboratory work. Also offered for graduate-level credit as Anth 554 and may be taken only once for credit. Prerequisites: admission to course is by permission of instructor via an application process. 

*Anth 455/555 ANALYSIS OF FAUNAL REMAINS (5)
Reviews issues of recovery, identification, quantification, and interpretation of archaeological faunal remains. Seminar component involves discussion and critical review of recent faunal studies. Laboratory component introduces student to skeletal anatomy of vertebrates (with focus on fishes and mammals) and basic procedures used in faunal analysis. Also offered for graduate-level credit as Anth 555 and may be taken only once for credit. Prerequisites: Anth 350. Graduate standing or instructor permission for 500-level course.

*Anth 456/556 ISSUES IN CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (4)
Examines the current cultural, legal and regulatory issues, problems, and frameworks affecting the management of cultural resources in North America and elsewhere in the world. Course coverage will include such topics as the laws affecting antiquities trafficking, and the relationships between indigenous peoples and archaeologists. Also offered for graduate-level credit as Anth 556. Prerequisites: Anth 350. Graduate standing or instructor permission for 500-level course.

*Anth 457/557 HUNTER-GATHERERS (4)
An investigation of the economic and social diversity among modern and ancient hunter-gatherers and the theories and methods used by archaeologists to investigate and explain that diversity. Examines topics such as the evolution of hunting and gathering, hunter-gatherer settlement and mobility strategies, social complexity among hunter-gatherers and hunter-gatherers in the modern world. Also offered for graduate-level credit as Anth 557 and may be taken only once for credit. Prerequisites: Anth 350. Graduate standing or instructor permission for 500-level course.

*Anth 458/558 PAST HUMAN-ENVIRONMENT INTERACTIONS
This course introduces students to major theoretical approaches and topics within the archaeological study of past human-environment interactions, including application of archaeological research to contemporary human-environment issues. Also offered for graduate-level credit as Anth 558 and may be taken only once for credit. Prerequisites: Anth 350. Graduate standing or instructor permission for 500-level course.

*Anth 461/561 ADVANCED TOPICS IN ARCHAEOLOGY (4)
 In-depth exploration and analysis of a major current problem in archaeology. Problems may be substantive or theoretical. Also offered for graduate-level credit as Anth 561. Prerequisites: Anth 350. Graduate standing or instructor permission for 500-level course. 

*Anth 464/564 TOPICS IN NORTHWEST ARCHAEOLOGY (4)
In-depth exploration of current problems in the study of Northwest Prehistory, particularly as it articulates with general theories of hunter-gatherer adaptations and cultural evolution. Also offered for graduate-level credit as Anth 564. Prerequisites: Anth 350. Graduate standing or instructor permission for 500-level course. Expected preparation: Anth 364. 

*Anth 471/571 ADVANCED TOPICS IN PALEOANTHROPOLOGY (4)
In-depth exploration and analysis of current problems in the study of Paleoanthropology. Emphasis on articulation of evolutionary theory with fossils and other relevant evidence. Recommended prerequisites: Anth 370.

*Anth 472/572 POPULATION DYNAMICS (4)
The study of the principles of Mendelian and population genetics as they apply to the evolution of human populations and the maintenance of diversity in modern populations. Emphasis also is placed on the articulation of genetic methods with evolutionary theory. Recommended prerequisites: Anth 372; 2 years of high school algebra or equivalent; Bi 341 as a pre- or co-requisite.

Anth 477/577 PRIMATOLOGY FIELD METHODS (4)
Focus on methods for collecting behavioral and ecological data on free-ranging primates through a combination of field exercises and lectures. Curriculum includes development of ethnograms, sampling methods and recording rules, mapping, and estimating resource availability. Students learn methods within a natural reserve setting populated by living primates. Prerequisites: Anth 101 or permission of instructor.

*Anth 478/578 HUMAN OSTEOLOGY (4)
The identification and interpretation of human skeletal material from archaeological sites: the determination of age, gender, and population affinity; an introduction to paleopathology and the recognition of genetic and cultural variation. Recommended prerequisites: Anth 350 and Anth 370.

*Anth 479/579 FORENSIC ANTHROPOLOGY (2)
Advanced techniques of human skeletal identification and their application to the solution of medico legal (forensic) problems. Recommended prerequisites: Anth 478/578 or consent of instructor.

*Anth 490/590 THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF VIOLENCE (4)
Theoretical and ethnographic exploration of the nature of violence. Topics include identity politics and nationalism; the biology of aggression and the cultural meanings of pain; state violence; symbolic and structural violence; and human rights. Recommended prerequisite: 8 credits in sociolocultural anthropology (Anth 304, 305 strongly recommended).

Anth 503 THESIS (Credit to be arranged.)

*Anth 511 CORE SEMINAR IN SOCIAL AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
A seminar that provides a methodological, theoretical, and substantive review and integration of anthropological materials in social and cultural anthropology. Prerequisites: graduate standing in anthropology and consent of instructor.

Anth 520 POLICY PAPER (4)
For students completing the policy track within the department's M.A./M.S. program. Preparing a graduate level paper, 25-30 pages in length, based on the student's internship experience and the relevant policy topic they are exploring. Student meets regularly with their faculty adviser. Prerequisite: Anth 504

*Anth 550 CORE SEMINAR IN ARCHAEOLOGY (4)
A seminar that provides a methodological, theoretical, and substantive review and integration of anthropological materials in archaeology. Prerequisites: graduate standing in anthropology and consent of instructor. 

*Anth 570 CORE SEMINAR IN PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY (4)
A seminar that provides a methodological, theoretical, and substantive review and integration of anthropological materials in physical anthropology. Prerequisites: graduate standing in anthropology and consent of instructor.

Courses marked with a * are not offered every year.